Economics

Economics is the study of the way individuals, businesses, and governments choose to allocate resources to best satisfy their objectives. The study of economics serves a number of purposes: it helps students understand the functioning of markets, of firms, and of financial organizations; it helps students understand public debate about economic policy, including taxation and government expenditure, trade and globalization, health and welfare; it prepares students for graduate study in fields like business and law; and it prepares students for graduate study leading to teaching and research in economics; and it serves as a direct steppingstone towards employment in business, finance, non-profit, and government organizations.

Students are required to begin with ECON 0110, an introductory course that stresses the economic problems of our society, and the vocabulary and principles of economic analysis. Intermediate level courses in microeconomics (ECON 1110), macroeconomics (ECON 1210), and econometrics (ECON 1620) round out the list of foundation courses for the concentration. Economics students must also fulfill a calculus requirement.

The economics department sponsors a number of alternative concentration options. The most popular is the standard economics concentration, described below. Three additional concentration options are administered jointly with other departments and are described separately under their respective titles. They are the concentrations in applied mathematics–economics, in mathematical economics, and in computer science–economics. The first two are especially recommended for students interested in graduate study in economics.

The department offers many of the required courses in an interdepartmental concentration called Business, Entrepreneurship and Organizations (BEO). BOE is jointly run by the departments of economics and sociology, and the division of engineering. BEO has three possible "tracks," of which the business economics track is most closely related to economics. Please contact the BEO administrator for more details, including information about advising in that concentration.

Standard Economics Concentration (for Class of 2015 or less)

Mathematics Course Requirements:

MATH 0060, 0070, or 0090, or a higher-level math course. Note that certain advanced economics courses may impose additional mathematical prerequisites. The standard mathematics requirement may be met through Advanced Placement tests, but "placing into" a higher level mathematics course than MATH 0090, without actually taking that higher level course, does not satisfy the requirement. The AP mathematics credit must appear on your Brown transcript.

Economics Course Requirements:

ECON 0110, ECON 1110 or 1130, 1210, 1620 or 1630, and at least five other 1000-level Economics courses.

In sum, you must complete 10 courses, 1 in mathematics and 9 in economics.



Standard Economics Concentration (for Class of 2016 or greater)

Mathematics Course Requirements:

MATH 0100 or a higher-level math course. Note that certain advanced economics courses may impose additional mathematical prerequisites. The standard mathematics requirement may be met through Advanced Placement tests, but "placing into" a higher level mathematics course than MATH 0090, without actually taking that higher level course, does not satisfy the requirement. The AP mathematics credit must appear on your Brown transcript.

Economics Course Requirements:

ECON 0110, ECON 1110 or 1130, 1210, 1620, and 1629 or 1630, and at least five other 1000-level Economics courses.

In sum, you must complete 11 courses, 1 in mathematics and 10 in economics.



All concentrators in economics programs are encouraged to consult their concentration advisors regularly. Economics concentrators who wish to study abroad should consult first with the department transfer credit advisor.

Honors

Students who wish to enroll in the honors program in economics should consult the department's undergraduate guide (available on its web site) to obtain a complete description of the requirements. See the description of Capstone Projects there, as well. Courses taken to prepare an honors thesis are in addition to the regular concentration requirements.




Page last updated in October, 2012.

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