Calendar of Events

  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    February 25, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Timothy Grinsell, University of Chicago. Title: Verdicts, Voters, and Vectors: Three Sources of Evidence for One Theory of Vagueness. Abstract: This talk presents three sources of evidence for the notion that linguistic vagueness results from the aggregation of a set of judgments. The word healthy, for instance, aggregates judgments along a number of contextually supplied “dimensions,” including blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. (with the relevant dimensions contextually determined). Given certain weak assumptions, the combinatorial problems associated with aggregating judgments along multiple dimensions explain healthy’s vagueness effects. I present three sources of evidence for this view. The first comes from jury verdicts. In some cases, juries are required to assign percentage values to a defendant's negligence, representing that portion of fault attributable to the defendant (e.g. 80% negligent). A study of about 800 jury verdicts (Best & Donohue 2012) shows that juries tend to assign these percentages in clumpy ways. This clumpiness provides evidence for a discontinuous scale structure, consistent with the aggregation hypothesis. Second, the well-known distinction between "absolute" and "relative" adjectives (Rotstein & Winter 2004, Kennedy & McNally 2005) provides evidence that unidimensionality reduces or eliminates vagueness effects, consistent with research in political science (like the Median Voter Theorem) that unidimensionality eliminates the aggregation problem (Sen 1970). Third, a topological view of the aggregation problem (Chichilnisky 1982) finds support in the representation of concepts as continuous spaces, in which dimensions are vectors (Gärdenfors 2000, 2014). LOCATION CHANGE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 330. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/ Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Perception Action Seminar Series Download Perception Action Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    February 26, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Narcisse Bichot, MIT. Title: Neural Mechanisms of Feature-based Visual Selection. Abstract: In cluttered scenes, we can use feature-based attention to quickly locate a target object, e.g. to find a particular face in a crowd. To understand how feature attention is used to find and select objects for action, we focused on the ventral pre-arcuate (VPA) region of prefrontal cortex. In a visual search task, VPA neurons responded selectivity to search cues with different features, and maintained their feature selectivity throughout the delay and subsequent saccades. VPA neurons also discriminated the search target in their receptive fields earlier than did cells in inferotemporal (IT) cortex and with a time course comparable to cells in the frontal eye fields (FEF). Inactivation of VPA impaired the animals’ ability to find targets in the contralateral hemifield, and simultaneous recordings in FEF revealed that the effects of feature attention were eliminated while leaving the effects of spatial attention in FEF intact. Altogether, it appears that neurons in VPA compute the locations of objects with the features we are searching for and send this information to FEF to guide eye movements to those relevant stimuli. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/ Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Lectures
  • How to Get Involved in Research in Cognitive (Neuro)Science Download How to Get Involved in Research in Cognitive (Neuro)Science to my desktop calendar

    February 26, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM The Cognitive (Neuro)science DUG will be hosting a panel of 6 seniors who will talk about their unique paths of getting involved in research in CLPS at Brown and beyond. The panel is geared toward underclassmen who have questions about how to pursue research opportunities. Barus & Holley, Room 158 Panel Discussions, Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments
  • Cognition Seminar Series Download Cognition Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    February 27, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Ines Pereria, Brown University. Title: TBA http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Lectures
  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    March 4, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Tania Rojas-Esponda, Stanford University. Title: TBA PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Tage Rai, Northwestern University Download Tage Rai, Northwestern University to my desktop calendar

    March 9, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Tage Rai, Northwestern University. Title: Virtuous Violence: Hurting and killing to create, sustain, end, and honor social relationships. Abstract: Violence is often considered the antithesis of sociality — people think that violence is the expression of our animal nature, breaking though when learned cultural norms collapse. Violence is also considered to be the essence of evil: it is the prototype of immorality. But an examination of violent acts and practices across cultures and throughout history shows just the opposite. When people hurt or kill someone, they usually do so because they feel they ought to do so: they feel that it is morally right or even obligatory to do the violence. Moreover, the motives for violence generally grow out of a relationship between the perpetrator and the victim, or their relationships with third parties. The perpetrator is violent to make the relationship right — to make the relationship what it ought to be according to his or her cultural implementations of universal relational moral principles. That is, most violence is morally motivated. Rather than reflecting the breakdown of morality, violence is the performance of moral rights and obligations. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU Download Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU to my desktop calendar

    March 11, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU. Title: Neurocognitive mechanisms of dynamic moral choice. Abstract: How do humans make choices despite competing pressures of fairness, harm, self-interest, and concern for others? Combining behavioral and neuroscientific methods, my research explores the social, emotional and cognitive factors that shape and ultimately guide these complex moral choices. The human moral calculus involves a balance of motivated actions (Should I help others at a cost to my self?) and responses to immoral behavior (How do I respond to unfair treatment?). Across several studies, I illustrate how motivations to be altruistic and fair are highly sensitive to the context in which the dilemma is framed. Moreover, I show that moral behavior is dependent on factors relating to emotional engagement—including empathy and distress—and that these affective mechanisms rely on distinct neural circuits. Taken together, my research demonstrates that while moral behavior is flexibly deployed, there are key factors that can systematically bias these social choices. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    March 18, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Vaclav Cvrcek, Institute of the Czech National Corpus. Title: TBA PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Lectures
  • Neurology Update, 2015 Download Neurology Update, 2015 to my desktop calendar

    March 28, 2015 7:00 AM - 3:30 PM Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 222 Richmond Street | Providence, RI 02912 Program Description Neurologic symptoms account for a disproportionately large percentage of primary care office visits and Emergency Department presentations. Stroke, seizure and headache related presentations are seen daily in a busy primary care practice. Gait problems and tremor are more frequently seen as our population ages. Cognitive and memory problems related to dementia and head trauma are ubiquitous. Complicating these trends, we are in the midst of a knowledge explosion that is markedly changing the face of Neurology. Improving the neurologic knowledge base of practitioners, especially those in primary care, will facilitate the successful identification and management of these patients. This CME Neurology Update focuses upon four major topics: 1) stroke, 2) seizure, 3) headache and neuropathic pain, and 4) movement disorders, memory and cognitive impairment. Subspecialists from Brown Neurology and its allied departments of Ophthalmology and Psychiatry will address these topics in a lively format of short presentations, panel discussions, and Q/A. Who Should Attend Physicians specializing in adult primary care, internal medicine, and psychiatry. Geriatricians, physician assistants, nurses, and nurse practitioners are also welcome. Learning Objectives At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to: 1. Describe current stroke care strategies 2. Explain differences among seizure types and their management 3. Identify different types/etiologies of headaches and their management Cancellation Policy Cancellations/substitutions must be made in writing to the Brown CME Office at least two weeks prior to the conference, no later than March 13, 2015. A $25.00 administrative fee will be charged for all refunds (no refunds for “no shows”). There will be no additional charge for substitutions. This conference is subject to change or cancellation. Accreditation This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit Designation Physicians: The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University designates this live activity for a maximum of 5.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(TM). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. AAFP: Application for CME credit has been filed with the American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending. Physician Assistants/Nurse Practitioners: Participants will receive a Certificate of Attendance for up to 5.75 hours. Psychologists: The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University has been approved by the Rhode Island Psychological Association to offer continuing education credits for Psychologists. The Alpert Medical School maintains responsibility for the program. This program is approved for 5.75 Category 1 CE Credit. (Credits available to RI licensed psychologists only). med.brown.edu/cme/brouchure/Neurology2015 Alpert Medical Building NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Medical School, Open to the Public, Dept: Continuing Medical Education, Dept: Neuroscience, Dept: CLPS, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Faculty, Staff, BioMed: Gerontology, BioMed:DiagnosticImaging, AMS: ConfClinic, AMS: GenSurgery, AMS: ColonRectal, AMS: Pediatric, AMS: SurgeryOrtho, AMS: Trauma, AMS: Urology, AMS: Anesthesiology, BioMed Division Calendars, PsychBehavior, Departments, Health Services
  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    April 1, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Junwen Lee, Brown University. Title: TBA PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    April 8, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Magdalena Kaufmann, University of Connecticut. Title: TBA PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    April 22, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Ryan Bennett, Yale University. Title: TBA PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars

Subscribe to our events calendar with our calendar feed: iCal icon

  • For Google Calendar, right-click on the calendar feed icon above, choose 'Copy link address', then visit your Google Calendar page and 'Add by URL.'
  • For iCal/Mac Calendar, right-click on the calendar icon above, choose 'Copy link address', then open iCal and create a 'New Calendar Subscription'. Paste the copied address into the Calendar URL field, and set an Auto-refresh setting of 'Every Day'.