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RENEWING ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AT BROWN

Report of the Committee to Review the Environmental Studies Concentration

As part of the ongoing cycle of reviews of Brown’s concentrations by the College Curriculum Council, an interdisciplinary committee met throughout the fall to review the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science curricula.

The report can be viewed here

Please note that these recommendations, if approved, would affect students in the class of 2017 and beyond. Current students' programs will not be affected.

The committee would appreciate your feedback. You may submit your comments through this feedback form.

 


PROPOSED CHANGES TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM SPARK STUDENT CONCERNS

BROWN DAILY HERALD ARITICLE - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM CHANGES FACE PROTEST

By MICHAEL DUBIN/Staff Writer, BDH

Photo by Lydia Yamaguichi, BDH

Concentrators expressed concerns about new required courses in a forum on Friday, March 15.

Students voiced sharp disagreement against proposed changes to the environmental studies concentration at a public forum Friday. Approximately 40 students and three of the 10 faculty members who served on the Committee to Review the Environmental Studies Concentration attended the forum, which was held at the Urban Environmental Laboratory to solicit student feedback on the changes.

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PBS SHORT FILM – THE STORY OF AN EGG

The Lexicon of Sustainability
PBS Short Video
Premiered May 14, 2012

This film explores the meaning behind such terms as “cage free” and “free range”.

WATCH FILM

UNDERGRADS PROTEST IN WASHINGTON D.C.

UNDERGRADS PROTEST KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE IN D.C.

By ALEXANDER BLUM/Staff Writer, Brown Daily Herald

Photo by Lawrence McDonald

For over 100 environmental student leaders within the Brown community, the long weekend was a break from classes ­— but not from advocating their cause. Living up to their activist image, Brown students traveled to the nation’s capital Sunday to march alongside an estimated 35,000 to 50,000 other protestors in opposition to the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

From the Washington Monument to the White House and back, protesters urged President Barack Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline and to move forward with other environmental initiatives. The protest — organized by The Sierra Club and 350.org —involved 168 organizations and was the largest climate march in United States history, according to The Sierra Club website.

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PROFESSOR STEPHEN PORDER SELECTED AS 2013 LEOPOLD LEADERSHIP FELLOW

Dr. Stephen Porder in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology has been selected as a 2013 Leopold Leadership Fellow.

The Leopold Leadership Program, located at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University, was founded in 1998 to fill a critical gap in environmental decision-making: getting the best scientific knowledge into the hands of government, nonprofit, and business leaders and the public to further the development of sustainable policies and practices.

Dr. Porder is among the 20 mid-career academic environmental scientists named as Fellows this year. The group was selected through a highly competitive process on the basis of their exceptional scientific qualifications, demonstrated leadership ability, and strong interest in sharing their knowledge beyond traditional academic audiences. The Fellows will take part in intensive leadership and communications training designed to hone their skills in engaging with decision-makers, media, and the public. They also become part of a network of past Fellows and program advisors who are working with leaders, both within and outside academe, to solve society’s most pressing environmental and sustainability challenges. The list of 2013 Fellows is below, and more information about the program is available at http://leopoldleadership.stanford.edu

POSSIBLE RI MARINE CLEAN-UP BILL

State Launches Marine Debris Clean-Up Bill
By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

PROVIDENCE — Dave McLaughlin showed up at the press conference with a large bag full of trash he had collected at 6:30 that morning from Hull Cove in Jamestown, one of Rhode Island’s most picturesque shorelines.

Beer cans, plastic bottles and bags, and foam shoe soles were emptied on a table. Some of the beer cans were the old pull-tab type. “We just did a cleanup there last month,” said McLaughlin, a volunteer with Clean Ocean Access, the organizer of the recent cleanup.

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VISITING PROFESSOR SETH ZUCKERMAN RECEIVES ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC LEADERSHIP AWARD

Author and visiting professor Seth Zuckerman traveled to Sacramento, Calif., on Jan. 22, where a project he directed for the Mattole Restoration Council was honored with the Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award.

“The Mattole Restoration Council is one of North America’s oldest community-led watershed restoration organizations. Established in 1983, the council’s primary mission is to understand, restore and conserve the ecosystems of the Mattole River watershed, with attention to threatened Coho and Chinook salmon and steelhead. The Mattole Forest Futures Project applies long-term thinking to the future of the forests in their watershed. Privately owned forests provide public benefits including wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration and watershed protection. The Forest Futures Project established a set of “light touch” harvest methods that promote the development of older forests, are compatible with economically viable logging and receive streamlined review because of additional environmental protections forged by stakeholders. The project used the first watershed-wide Program Timberland Environmental Impact Report (PTEIR) and made it available to any landowner in the watershed who chooses to harvest under its terms. Participants file a checklist-style plan that costs approximately 50% less than a regular Timber Harvest Plan (THP).”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL AWARD PROGRAM

BROWN PROF. RICK BENJAMIN NAMED RI POET LAUREATE

Governor Lincoln D. Chafee today appointed Rick Benjamin, Ph.D., of Warwick as State Poet of Rhode Island. Dr. Benjamin replaces outgoing State Poet Lisa Starr of Block Island, whose five-year term has expired.

"Dr. Rick Benjamin is an accomplished and committed poet and educator who has taken his love for and belief in the power of poetry far beyond the classroom and out into our Rhode Island communities," Governor Chafee said. "One of the many letters of recommendation sent on Dr. Benjamin's behalf stated, 'Rick Benjamin knows that poetry can change people – that the writing and reading of poems can change how we live within and give back to our communities.' Another wrote, 'Based on his extensive community involvement with poetry, I think he has already distinguished himself as an "unofficial" State Poet.' With this in mind, it is my pleasure to make the unofficial official and appoint Rick Benjamin the State Poet of Rhode Island."

Rick Benjamin teaches ENVS-0520, Wild Literature in the Urban Landscape, during the spring semester at Brown through Environmental Studies.

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BROWN STUDENTS SCRAP TOGETHER

Brown Students Scrap Together Campus Composting

By SOPHIE DUNCAN/ecoRI News college intern

PROVIDENCE — On a recent Sunday night, several Brown University students gathered for the last SCRAP meeting of the year. SCRAP— also known as the Student Compost Initiative — began as an environmental studies assignment for a class.

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ECOREPS SIFT THROUGH BROWN TRASH

EcoReps Sift Through Brown Trash for Recyclables

By SOPHIE DUNCAN/ecoRI News college intern

PROVIDENCE — Last month several Brown University students gathered at Wriston Quad wearing white Tyvex suits and shouting “America Recycles Day!” For three hours they ripped open 40 bags, 20 trash and 20 recycling, to see how accurately students dispose of their waste. The trash and recycling bags came from four areas of campus.

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2013 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM PLAN RI

Ramping-Up Energy Efficiency in Rhode Island

On November 2, National Grid submitted the 2013 Energy Efficiency Program Plan for Rhode Island to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) for review and consideration. The 2013 Energy Efficiency Plan was developed collaboratively by key stakeholders representing a wide range of consumer and environmental interests, including the Energy Efficiency & Resource Management Council (EERMC), ENE, the Division of Public Utilities and Carriers, The Energy Council of Rhode Island, and the Office of Energy Resources. The plan also incorporates ideas and feedback that members of the public presented at the Rhode Island Energy Efficiency Forum, held in September.

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STEEL YARD SHOWS HOW REUSE TRUMPS RECYCLING

PROVIDENCE — It may look to some that the folks at the Steel Yard need to mow the lawn, but the overgrown grasses, trees and shrubs on the property are part of an integrated storm water mitigation plan.

From steel mills to locomotive manufacturers, Rhode Island's capital city has a long history of industrialism. While that industrialism gave rise to booming economics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, few of those big mills and businesses remain today. Unfortunately, due mostly to ignorance, those manufacturers and mills have left much of the city’s — and state’s — soil and ground water contaminated, or at least potentially contaminated.

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ARTICLE - KATHERINE SMITH'S WORK WITH TEENS ON THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON HUMAN HEALTH

Teaching Teens About Climate Change, Health

Katherine Smith’s students had to wait until they came to Brown University to learn how climate change could affect human health. Now that Smith and her fall semester class have developed a rich new curriculum on the subject for high school teachers, future 10th to 12th graders might not have to wait so long.

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Photo by Mike Cohea, Brown University / Article by David Orenstein, Brown University

ARTICLE ON BROWN'S DIVEST COAL STUDENT GROUP

Students Aim to Hit Fossil Fuel Where It Hurts

By KEVIN PROFT/ecoRI News staff

Divestment from fossil fuels means selling investments in companies such as Chevron and BP. Individuals can divest, but it’s when large organizations such as universities and municipal governments divest that companies like ExxonMobil are tangibly affected financially.

Most colleges have huge endowments, money built up through donations over time. They invest their endowments in the market and then use the profits to pay expenses. Brown University’s endowment is about $2.5 billion. Harvard’s is more than $30 billion. Collectively, the money invested by universities into the market is enormous.

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CES REPORT ON UN CLIMATE NEGOTIATIONS GETS WIDE MEDIA COVERAGE

Brown Professor J. Timmons Roberts, Graduate Student David Ciplet and Undergraduate Students Spencer Fields and Keith Madden authored a report that was released Monday, November 26, 2012 on the eve of the United Nations climate change negotiations in Doha. The report, published with the organization the International Institute for Environment and Development, and researched as part of their Climate and Development Lab at Brown University, assesses the extent to which wealthy countries have delivered adequate finance to developing countries to prevent and adapt to climate change. The group found that wealthy countries have fallen far short in keeping eight key promises, and they outline critical steps to make progress moving forward. The research has received extensive coverage in over 50 media outlets in 22 countries including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, Reuters and Bloomberg Business Week and Democracy Now. Here are links to some of the coverage:

LINKS TO MORE COVERAGE

BROWN SLASHES CARBON FOOTPRINT, ENERGY COSTS

Article – Brown Daily Herald

"Brown University has reduced its energy-related greenhouse gas emissions by 29.4 percent during the last five years and slashed its annual energy costs by $3 million in the process, according to the University’s2012 Sustainability Progress Report. Since 2008, the University has invested $14 million in energy efficiency projects. Energy savings will cover the investment; a $2.6-million lighting project will pay for itself in less than five years."

READ ARTICLE

This fall ENVS student Elara Mosquera has been working with Environment Rhode Island on a campaign to ban plastic bags in Providence, RI. Their main form of community outreach is via a physical and online petition.

You can read more and sign the petition here

Democracy Now! posts video of environmentalist Bill McKibben speaking about Hurricane Sandy and climate change.

"It’s really important that everybody, even those who aren’t in the kind of path of this storm, reflect about what it means that in the warmest year in U.S. history, ... in a year when we saw, essentially, summer sea ice in the Arctic just vanish before our eyes, what it means that we’re now seeing storms of this unprecedented magnitude," McKibben says. "If there was ever a wake-up call, this is it."

WATCH VIDEO

CLIMATE CONVERSATIONS - INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE 'INVALUABLE' FOR ANDEAN ADAPTATION

Article by Brown Student Emily Kirkland

In Eastern Africa, severe drought is causing massive famines. In the United States, temperature records are soaring due to one of the warmest winters in decades. From pine beetle infestations in the Rockies to thinning ice in the Arctic, the impacts of climate change are inescapable.

Indigenous peoples have extensive knowledge of their local environments, gained through hundreds of years of observation and trial and error. They possess a large repository of strategies, skills, and techniques for dealing with climate variability.

Three examples from the Peruvian Andes – included in a Brown University paper- illustrate the importance of the role of indigenous knowledge for adaptation.

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WHAT COUNTRY FACES THE WORST CLIMATE CHANGE?

Rising seas threaten to drown island countries such as the Maldives and Kiribati in the era of global warming — a dire scenario that has forced leaders to plan for floating cities or consider moving their entire populations to neighboring countries. Most countries won't need to take such drastic steps to simply survive, but many more will similarly experience the uglier side of climate change.

Read Article from TEC HNEWS DAILY

UNTANGLING SEA LION INDIVIDUALITY

Project by Tara Gancos Crawford, CES MA '10

Throughout most of their range on the west coast of North America, California sea lions are abundant. However, the genetically distinct population in the Gulf of California, Mexico is declining. This "stock" has declined by 20% in the last two decades with some colonies reduced by 50%, having a high probability of going extinct in the next fifty years. Sea lions play important roles in healthy ecosystems as top predators and prey, so losing them in Mexican waters may have serious impacts on the environment.

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BROWN STUDENT WINS GRAND PRIZE IN NATIONAL CHANGEMAKER COMPETITION

19-year-old Lauren Behgam takes hunger personally. A rising sophomore at Brown University, she helped to start the Food Recovery Network (FRN), a national student-led nonprofit that donates the surplus unsellable food from campus dining halls to people in need.

On Saturday, she presented her work to a panel of judges and a live audience and was awarded the $15,000 grand prize in the Banking on Youth Competition in Washington, DC. Behgam and the Food Recovery Network competed alongside five other young finalists from across America in the pitch-off, who were all flown to the nation’s capital to present. A total of 180 young change makers entered the competition, which was put on by Ashoka Youth Venture and the Consumer Bankers Association to recognize and inspire youth-led social entrepreneurship.

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HEATHER LESLIE DISCUSSES THE OCEAN HEALTH INDEX

Sustainable management of a huge, complex and valuable resource such as the ocean requires a comprehensive metric that did not exist until now. In the Aug. 16 edition of Nature a broad group of scientists including Heather Leslie, the Sharpe Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, describes the Ocean Health Index. The index rates coastal places, from regions to nations, on 10 goals: artisanal fishing opportunity, biodiversity, carbon storage, clean waters, coastal livelihoods and economies, coastal protection, food provision, natural products, sense of place, and tourism and recreation. Leslie recently answered questions posed by David Orenstein.

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SCIENCE COALITION VIDEO ON INNOVATOR PROFESSOR HEATHER LESLIE

Dr. Leslie leads an international interdisciplinary research team focused on small-scale fisheries in Mexico’s Gulf of California. The research approaches and findings she is developing in Mexico are applicable to other ecological and institutional contexts, including the United States. Dr. Leslie and her research team also are translating the results of their research to help inform implementation of the first-ever National Ocean Policy in the United States. This policy recognizes the impact of our oceans on national security, energy development, food provision and our economy. Dr. Leslie’s work has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

SEE VIDEO

JOHN HOPE COMMUNITY GARDEN ARTICLE

Growing community at the John Hope Settlement House

By Courtney Coelho 

A Brown-led community garden at Providence's John Hope Settlement House nourishes little minds and bodies by helping children ages 3 through 12 learn about urban agriculture while enjoying the fruits of their labor.

Read The Article

CES STUDY IN PROVIDENCE JOURNAL

Brown U. study: Providence neighborhoods with trees far cooler in summer's heat

By Alex Kuffner

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- We all know that on hot days it's cooler under a tree. But a class at Brown University set out to quantify how much cooler and explain the reasons why.

Read The Article

Read The Report
WILL ALLEN TALKS ABOUT RAISED GARDEN BEDS IN PROVIDENCE SCHOOL PLAYGROUND

GROWING FARMERS
By Charlotte Bruce Harvey '78
Brown Alumni Magazine

Will Allen was talking to a group of kindergartners, graduate students, and teachers gathered around raised beds in a Providence school playground in early April.

“He comes from Milwaukee, Wisconsin,” explained Kathryn DeMaster, a visiting assistant professor in the Center for Environmental Studies, “which is a city a lot like Providence. He teaches people to grow food.”

Then she added, “He used to be a professional basketball player.”

“He’s bigger than every basketball player!” exclaimed one awestruck boy.

Allen, who is about as tall and muscular as the mythical Paul Bunyan, was visiting the John Hope Settlement House with Brown students who’ve been helping the children grow vegetables as part of a DeMaster-taught class called Sustenance and Sustainability. “I want to see more Ivy-educated farmers,” she said, noting that grad students, too, need basic farming lessons.

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STUDENTS WORK TO REDUCE YEAR END WASTE

COLLEGE STUDENTS PREFER NOT TO LEAVE TRASHED
By JOANNA DETZ/ecoRI News staff

For four years, EcoReps, a student-run group at Brown University, has partnered with the university’s facilities management staff to collect furniture, clothing, house wares and other items from students moving out.  The program, dubbed Clean Break, has collected 40 tons of goods during the past four springs. Last year, the group took in 17 tons of items, and donated much of the haul to the Rhode Island Donation Exchange Program.

Brown University sophomore Gretchen Gerlach (ENVS) was one of roughly 20 students who volunteered to coordinate collection efforts last year. She will do it again this month, as EcoReps plans to set up nine collection “corrals” around campus where students can drop off goods for donation.

Gerlach recalled being shocked by what she saw in the corrals last spring. “I was so overwhelmed at how many brand-new packaged items I saw — clothes with the tags still on them and food and electronics that hadn’t even been opened yet.”

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" Watson, who is concentrating in Environmental Studies at Brown and Apparel Design at RISD, tries to use what she learns at Brown about the environmental impacts of apparel production and implement it into her designs at RISD, she wrote."

"I wanted to capture the power and drama of nature" - Watson.

Read Brown Daily Herald Article

STUDENTS UPDATING CENTRAL FALLS DISASTER PLAN

About 30 Environmental Studies students from Brown University are working with Central Falls to update and expand the city’s plan for managing natural disasters, including flooding from the Blackstone River.

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SPECIES MANAGEMENT: THE CONFERENCE

Species
Management:
The Conference

Dov Sax, of Brown’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Bernd Blossey, professor of natural resources at Cornell University, organized a conference for the Ecological Society of America in West Virginia. Among the topics: What to do when climate change forces species out of their historical habitats.

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BROWN UNIVERSITY INSTALLS SOLAR PANELS ON THE NEW AQUATICS CENTER

By Richard Lewis

The 168 rectangular panels on the roof of the Katherine Moran Coleman Aquatic Center will generate enough power to keep the lights on and enough thermal energy to heat the million-gallon pool. The center, due to open April 13, will be Rhode Island’s first hybrid (heat and power) solar installation — also the largest in the nation and the first on a college campus.

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CES GRAD STUDENT GOES BEHIND THE SCENES AT DURBAN

By Courtney Coelho 

When graduate student Brianna Craft volunteered to help the Least Developed Countries bloc at the United Nations climate change negotiations in Durban, she had no idea she'd been given an all-access pass to the closed-door climate talks. Here she talks about her experience, what she learned and why she's still optimistic about the possibility of international climate justice. 

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Stormwater utility fee system explained

 

Article by CES Graduate Student Kate England

WESTERLY - The typical Westerly homeowner would pay $68 per year under a stormwater utility fee system included in a draft report produced by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Owners of a typical commercial property would pay $449.

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CES STAFF/STUDENTS TRAVEL TO DURBAN SOUTH AFRICA

CES Chair J. Timmons Roberts and Environmental Studies students travel to Durban South Africa for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations (Nov. 28-Dec 10, 2011)

The purpose of this group is to contribute timely, accessible and impactful content that informs more just and effective global policy making on climate change, particularly on the issues of climate finance and Latin America. The focus during the fall 2011 semester is to influence the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations in Durban, South Africa to produce more just and effective processes and outcomes concerning climate finance and other relevant climate policy. FOLLOW THEIR PROGRESS ON LINKS BELOW:

Global Conversation: Follow Brown's Climate Change Team at the COP 17 Negotiations http://www.watsoninstitute.org/news_detail.cfm?id=1602

Climate & Development Lab – Twitter Feed http://climatedevlab.wordpress.com/

Intercambio Climático – Blog of the Latin American Platform on Climate http://www.intercambioclimatico.com/en/

Adaptation finance: How can Durban deliver on past promises? http://environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/article/opinion/47954

LOCAL OCCUPY PROTESTERS JOIN D.C. RALLY

PROVIDENCE —The local Occupy movement traveled to Washington this weekend to join an estimated 10,000 protesters against the proposed transcontinental tar sands oil pipeline.

Two buses left the city early Saturday with about 40 protesters from the Occupy Providence and Occupy College Hill protest groups for the Sunday afternoon rally at the White House. The event was organized by activist and college professor Bill McKibben of 350.org and Tarsandsaction.org. Both groups urge President Obama to deny the permit for the pipeline.

By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

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UNITING ART AND BIOLOGY TO CONSERVE CORAL REEFS

OUTREACH, EDUCATION, AND CHARITY TO INSPIRE MARINE STEWARDSHIP AMONG POLICY MAKERS AND THE PUBLIC.

By Courtney Mattison

Art and science are increasingly joining forces, more now than in the past, because of their shared creativity and the critical importance of conveying accurate messages to the public about the natural world. Mattison aims to discover how art and science can inform one another and combine to catalyze a public and political movement for coral reef conservation. To learn more about Courtney Mattison’s project Click Here.

PRESS:

CLICK HERE to read this article about recent Environmental Studies graduate Matt Severson and his extraordinary work.

*Article from July / August 2011 Issue of Brown Alumni Magazine

CES Alumni Chip Giller founded Grist, a nonprofit organization based in Seattle, WA, to provide smart environmental news minus the gloom, doom, and sanctimony -- and to spur people to action. Back in college, Giller carried around all the garbage he produced for a week to demonstrate the wastefulness of the average student. Now the staff at Grist has dared him to do it again. For a week, Giller will carry his family's trash wherever he goes. To keep him motivated CLICK HERE to make a donation supporting his efforts and Grist's green news and advice.

To learn more about this dare CLICK HERE


cop16_logo_100.jpg

Nine Brown Students to Cover Cancun Climate Negotiations

                                                                   

                                                          

With seed funding from Brown’s office for International Affairs and the Watson Institute, Professor Timmons Roberts and CES Research Fellow Guy Edwards have begun an ambitious new project of “engaged scholarship” on how Latin America is addressing the issue of Climate Change.  A team of eight Brown students—five undergrads, three Master’s students, and one PhD student—will be accompanying them the U.N. climate negotiations in Cancun this December. 

The project centers around a multilingual web portal and blog, developed in partnership with a Latin American network called the PCL—the Plataforma Climatica Latinoamericana, a project of the Fundacion Futuro Latinoamericano and the UK-based Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN).   In Cancun, Plataforma members and Brown students will work together as teams on reporting key issues in the negotiations.

Longer-range projects of the consortium will be country-by-country reports on: Climate models and vulnerability, Adaptation Options and Climate Politics.  The site will include exhaustive and updated web resources on climate change for reporters, policy-makers, teachers, and citizens. 


Other Topics of Interest

CES student Eric Van Arsdale has been working on Cape Cod this summer studying what residents and visitors know about the salt marsh die back that threatens the Cape's precious marshes. He offers a small taste of the experience in his op-ed in today's Cape Cod Times ahead of his presentation tomorrow at the Annual State of the harbor conference in Wellfleet. Eric's fellowship was made possible through the Brown Environmental fellows program, funded by the Henry David Thoreau Foundation the Silverton Foundation through the Environmental Change Initiative and the Center for Environmental Studies. 

Eric's op ed



Brown Daily Herald 3 September 2010

Grad students' climate change suggestions inspire legislation

This summer, a University research project was transformed into legislation aiming to address the effects of climate change in Rhode Island. The new law was supported by Rep. David Segal, D-Providence and East Providence, in the state House of Representatives and Sen. Joshua Miller, D-Cranston, in the state Senate.

The piece of legislation — which was passed by the Rhode Island General Assembly in June and became law — adopted three of the 26 recommendations made by students in the fall 2009 seminar, ENVS 2010: “Special Topics in Environmental Studies: Urban Adaptation to Climate Change,” taught by J. Timmons Roberts, director of the Center for Environmental Studies and professor of sociology and environmental studies.  View full article


The Providence Journal 25 July 2010

R.I. environmentalists elated at National Ocean Policy

Last week, President Obama signed an executive order creating the first National Ocean Policy in the nation’s history. This column includes comments by Heather Leslie, professor of biology, who thinks the new policy will go a long way toward helping people see the connections among abundant seafood, clean water, safe beaches and coastal development. View full report and follow-up editorial by Professor Leslie.


June 22, 2010: Special Issue on Changing Climates featuring an Interview with CES Director J. Timmons Roberts on the
Theory, Culture and Society Blog


R.I. Senator Whitehouse proposes national fund for ocean research

Mary Lesbirel, David Murray (CES), Senator Whitehouse, Lena Weiss, John Torgan (Save The Bay), Sara Clemens.

Monitoring done by David Murray and John Torgan is used to help find ways to prevent ecological disasters and protect waters.


Curious about what environmental legislation is being discussed and voted on in Rhode Island? Want to get in on some action at the statehouse?

Env Legislation Science Cafe

Team up with the Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island's CARE Alliance, an EPA-funded group that meets monthly to discuss environmental hazards and solutions in Providence!


Brown Dining Services Sustainability Program was formed in 2010, bringing together the Real Food Initiative, Community Harvest program, Beyond the Bottle and SCRAP (Brown's new composting group), under one central management group.

Check it out!!