Skip over navigation
Brown Home Brown Home Brown University Cogut Center for the Humanities Brown Home Brown Home Brown University

2011-12 Events Calendar

Fall 2011

September 12
"The Scale of Modernity: JM Synge and the Everyday"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:00pm

JM Synge's only published book of prose, The Aran Islands, has long been read as an ethnographic account of what Synge imagined to be one of the most 'primitive' cultures in Europe in the 1890s. WB Yeats famously claimed to have sent Synge there to 'express a life that has never found expression.' But the culture on these islands, perched on the western edge of Ireland, is undergoing rapid change in the 1890s, which continually manifests itself in strange ways in Synge's prose, unsettling the notion that this is mere ethnography. The most obvious effect of these changes is the incursion of the global into the local, as the islands become a site of emerging modernity, and Synge struggles throughout his book—and later in his more famous plays—to both capture and resist the scale of modernity. In the struggle to represent modernity in what was imagined as a traditional community, Synge makes a breakthrough in Irish writing, marking his text as perhaps one of the earliest modernist novels in Ireland.

Speaker Cóilín Parsons was educated in Ireland and the US, where he received his PhD from Columbia University in 2008. He was a lecturer at Columbia University and an adjunct Professor at New York University before he joined the faculty at the University of Cape Town in 2009. He is currently working on a number of articles on the mapping of Ireland in the nineteenth century, and a book manuscript on the cartographic origins of Irish modernist literature, tentatively entitled Maps to Modernism: cartography and the development of Irish literature.

More about Cóilín Parsons.

A copy of the poster.


September 21
"Blurring the Focus as a Physician Photographer"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:00 - 6:30pm

Ana Blohm, MD, is an internist and photographer. She is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, a physician in Mount Sinai's Visiting Doctors Program and co-director of the Humanities and Medicine Program in the Division of General Internal Medicine. Dr. Blohm will discuss the visual arts and medicine and the ethically complex relationship between photography and medicine.

This lecture is the first in the 2011-12 Creative Physicians Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

More information on the Creative Physicians series.

Read Ana Blohm's blog.

A copy of the poster.


October 17
"Religion, Secularism, and Democratic Culture"
Colloquium
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
12:00 - 2:00pm

As part of the 2011-12 Religion and Internationalism Project, Prof. Mark Cladis, the Brooke Russell Astor Professor of the Humanities in the Department of Religious Studies, will lead the discussion on two of his recent publications on religion, secularism, and democratic culture. The discussion will address questions regarding religion and public sphere: Is religion-politics always a dangerous or “unnatural” combination in the modern world?  How can civil religions and traditional religions contribute to the flourishing of a democracy?

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for links to the two readings.

A copy of the flyer.


November 16
"Serious Play: How Improvisational Theater Can Improve the Practice of Medicine"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:00pm

The physician-patient encounter may be structured, but it is never scripted: every interaction is to some degree improvised. Like theatrical improvisers, physicians often don’t know what “character” they’ll encounter or what their patient will say or do. Like improvisers, physicians must learn to collaborate and communicate with deep listening and observation skills, and the ability to respond spontaneously in novel circumstances distinguishes professionals from the amateurs. Katie Watson, JD, is a bioethicist and lawyer who is assistant professor in the Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine. She is also adjunct faculty at the Second City Theater Training Center where she teaches improv and sketch writing. She created a popular “medical improv” seminar applying the principles that she has taught Northwestern medical students since 2002. This lecture will introduce the principles of improv as an art form, explore their relevance to clinical skills, and consider data on medical students’ reactions to Prof.Watson’s medical improv seminar.

This lecture is the second in the 2011-12 Creative Physicians Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

More information on the Creative Physicians series.

A copy of the poster.


November 16
"Gods in Uniform:  Constructing and Deconstructing Sovereignty, from Political Theology to Metaphorology"
Colloquium
Pembroke 202
5:30 - 7:30pm

The speaker is Jean-Claude Monod from the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). In "Gods in Uniform", Ernst Kantorowicz evoked the 'principle of mutual imitation' between representations of emperors and representations of the gods. This phenomenon participates in a more general phenomenon, observable at the "theologico-political" level of representations of sovereignty. All such representations have used theological models, metaphors and analogies, in order to defend, extend or criticize the prerogatives – or the very principle – of sovereignty. The speaker will focus on two moments of this rhetorical and political phenomenon: the vexed status of sovereignty in the wake of the French Revolution, and the contestation of the theological roots of the concept in the debates provoked by Carl Schmitt and Hans Blumenberg." This is the second colloquium in the Religion and Internationalism Project series for 2011-12.

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for links to the two readings.

A copy of the flyer.


November 18-19
"Music and Civil Society"
Symposium

Part One:
Pembroke 305
172 Meeting Street
9:30am - 5:30pm

Part Two:
Providence CityArts for Youth
891 Broad Street
10:00am - 3:00pm

Several musical initiatives around the world have been gaining prominence in recent years for the impact they’re having on historically challenged communities, and for the quality of music making they’re producing.

A symposium co-sponsored by Community MusicWorks and the Cogut Center examines the impact of music on a civil society by bringing together academics and practitioners from several of these initiatives. Through a series of dialogues and musical presentations, musicians, teachers, students, and academics from Providence, Venezuela, Berlin, the Middle East, and other locations will explore a rich set of questions to build further understanding and share best practices.

Light breakfast and lunch are included (Friday and Saturday) with pre-registration. REGISTRATION FOR FRIDAY'S EVENT IS NOW FULL.

Symposium schedule.

A copy of the poster.

See the video of the proceedings on iTunesU. The first session is Michael Steinberg's introduction on track 4, ending with Leon Botstein's keynote address on track 10.


December 7
"The Word is God: Language Ideologies and the God Debate in London"

Colloquium
Watson Institute, McKinney Seminar Room
12:00 - 2:00pm

Speaker Marcy Brink-Danan, Dorot Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, offers this synopsis of her talk: "In descriptions of the failure of multiculturalism one often hears of cultures “lost in translation.” The idea that cultural groups clash when their worldviews go un-translated has gained currency in academia and on the street, but lacks empirical evidence. The goal of this study is to turn an ethnographic lens on the way people actually talk about God in order to test the widespread cultural translation metaphor. I argue that translation is not the problem for multicultural society; rather, adversarial groups cling to an ideology of miscommunication because they have no intention of listening to those with whom they disagree. By analyzing language recorded during fieldwork in London with members of the Humanist movement, interfaith chaplains, directors of faith-inspired dialogue groups and Christian think tank staff, this talk examines how variation in beliefs about language, rather than variation in theology, shapes British discussions about faith, doubt and social cohesion."

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for the link to the reading.

A copy of the flyer.


December 10
Community MusicWorks Players

Live Performance
Pembroke Hall 305
4:00 - 6:00pm

The Community MusicWorks Players, with Frank Rosenwein, principal oboist of The Cleveland Orchestra, perform works by Boccherini (Quintet for Oboe and Strings), Corigliano (Arioso), Harbison (Snow Country), and Milhaud (Les rêves de Jacob).

This concert is free; optional donations will be collected in support of Community MusicWorks after-school education programs.

Visit the photo gallery for this event.


Spring 2012

February 1
“But I’m a Good Doctor”: A Playwright Takes on Medical Malpractice
Lecture and staged reading
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Speaker Deborah Salem Smith is playwright-in-residence at Trinity Repertory Company and author of Love Alone, recipient of an Edgerton Foundation New American Play Award. Love Alone is the story of what happens after a routine medical procedure goes tragically wrong.  A lawsuit ensues and the lives of both the patient’s family and the doctor charged with her care are transformed. It is a portrait of how we grieve and how we heal. 

Ms. Smith’s talk will begin with actors, from Trinity Rep and the Brown/Trinity MFA program, reading an excerpt from the play.  She will then share the experiences that led her to write about doctors and medical malpractice.  The journey of creating this story has forced her to consider profound and timely social questions: What are the implications and burdens of such faith? What is human error in medicine and what is negligence?  Which institutions can we trust—hospitals?  The courts?  Do lawsuits empower victims and thus aid the grieving process?  Or does a lawsuit disrupt that process?  What does a lawsuit mean for the doctor sued—and for her personal journey of recovering from the unexpected death of a patient?

Love Alone was recently recognized with an Honorable Mention by the Jane Chambers Playwriting Award.  The play also received a prestigious Edgerton Foundation New American Play Award to support its premiere at Trinity Repertory Company.  The play will be on stage at Trinity from February 28th-May 27th, 2012.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.


February 16
"The Politics of the Event and the Fragility of Things"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Speaker William Connolly, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University, considers the differing degrees of real creativity in three domains: in cultural processes, in some nonhuman forcefields, and in a host of culture/nature imbrications. When such a perspective is joined to an account of the expansion, intensification and acceleration of neoliberal capitalism, we are brought face to face with the fragility of things today­-that is, with the growing gaps and tensions between the demands neoliberalism makes on human activities and nonhuman forcefields and on the capacity of both to meet those demands. This talk will contend that a sufficient sense of the fragility of things requires both a refined sensitivity on our part to a variety of contemporary role definitions and non-human processes. And that these sensitivities must also be linked to a new politics of militance.

A copy of the poster.


February 17
"Constellations of a Contemporary Romanticism"
Colloquium
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
9:30am - 5:30pm

The concept of the “contemporary” has haunted romantic writers and philosophers, and has often been a vexed starting point for discussions of innovation, nostalgia, historical situatedness, presentism, and futurity. Indeed, what romanticism appears to signal, as a complex—or what Forest Pyle has called a “constellation”—of aesthetic, political, moral, and social considerations, often translates into discussions of its own conceptual afterlife. In other words, romanticism as irreducible to periodization, and more of a movement of thought that continues to saturate our contemporary and future moments. As a call for interdisciplinarity, romanticism just as often shatters the linkages it presumes to make between genres, forms, and fields. This symposium will specifically aim to assemble both romantic specialists and scholars from outside the field in order to create dialogues and projects around the particularity and portability of “romanticism.” It will throw into relief the refractions, theoretical linkages, and intermedial permutations of romanticism throughout contemporary culture and aesthetics, as well as trace its enduring remains. The objective will be to locate instances where texts, films, paintings, and theoretical interventions sustain an engagement with romantic literature and thought, and offer new perspectives on a romanticism that never settles for the present, but is always motile and evocative of something yet to come.

Speakers include: Jane Bennett (Johns Hopkins University), Lee Edelman (Tufts University), Elizabeth Fay (UMass/Boston), Jerrold Hogle (University of Arizona), Forest Pyle (University of Oregon), Steven Shaviro (Wayne State University).

Colloquium schedule.

A copy of the poster.

Photo gallery from the event.


February 22
"Total Belief — Delirium in the West"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

What is the nature of our political investments?  In what, psychically, do they consist?  In this lecture, speaker Jacqueline Rose will return to Hannah Arendt’s analysis of totalitarianism as mental control and ask: what form of belief and passion does such subjection entail? What happens when a political belief becomes sacred?  What categories of truth and falsehood, belief and disbelief, were engaged in the ideological order of the Third Reich?  This lecture will suggest that there is a productive link to be forged between Arendt’s analysis and Freud’s engagement with the question of faith. Above all, by focusing on one of the darkest moments of European history, it will suggest that those who too quickly ascribe the category of the religious `fanatic’ or `extremist’ to distant cultures and worlds have much to learn from some of the most intense deliriums – lethal and transformative - of the West.

This lecture is part of CRITICAL DIALOGUES IN ARTS AND HUMANITIES.

A copy of the poster.


February 23
"The Last Resistance: Piano Music of Mohammed Fairouz"
Live performance
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street
8:00pm

Pianist Steven Spooner will perform works by young Arab-American composer Mohammed Fairouz. Works include Piano Sonata #1 Reflections on Exile, based on the essays of Edward Said, and Piano Sonata #2 The Last Resistance based on the essays of Jacqueline Rose.

This concert is part of CRITICAL DIALOGUES IN ARTS AND HUMANITIES.

More information about Mohammed Fairouz and this concert.

Read about and listen to Fairouz's "Tahrir for Clarinet and Orchestra."

Free and open to the public. No reservations necessary.
Seating is first-come, first-served; please arrive early.
Doors open at 7:15pm.

A copy of the poster.


February 24
"Music, Writing and Critique"
Panel discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
3:30 - 5:00pm

This panel will open up a conversation across disciplines to think with and about music in translation.  Panelists Jacqueline Rose (Queen Mary, University of London) and composer Mohammed Fairouz will address questions including: How does engagement with classical genres and forms (the symphony and the sonata) inform a contemporary musical agenda? How does it inform a political agenda? How does instrumental music engage literary and critical texts, including States of Fantasy and The Last Resistance?  Cogut Center Director Michael Steinberg will moderate.

This panel discussion is part of CRITICAL DIALOGUES IN ARTS AND HUMANITIES.

A copy of the poster.

See the video of this event.


February 28
"Revisiting Post-Islamism"
Colloquium
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
111 Thayer Street
2:00 - 4:00pm

 In an earlier work Making Islam Democratic (2007), speaker Asef Bayat, Aga Khan Visiting Professor in Islamic Humanities
Faculty Fellow at the Watson Institute, tries to interrogate the infamous question of whether Islam was compatible with democracy. Bayat concluded that whereas Islamism (understood as deployment of Islam for the political project of establishing Islamic state) was unlikely to embrace democratic polity, ‘post-Islamism’ could and did. His early formulation of ‘post-Islamism’ was based primarily on the experience of Iran in the late 1990s. Bayat's current work tries to see how much this concept has a broader resonance, given that Islamist movements in the Muslim world have experienced significant changes in the past two decades or so. The talk will focus on revisiting the concept by addressing the questions that its application to other experiences of Islamist politics may raise, as well as the questions that critiques have raised since the concept’s inception.

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for a link to the reading.

A copy of the flier.


February 28
Master voice class with Wolfgang Holzmair
Grant Recital Hall
Hope Street and Young Orchard Avenue
5:00 - 7:00pm

Brown voice students participate in a master class with world-renowned Austrian baritone Wolfgang Holzmair.

Free and open to the public. Participating voice students by invitation only.


February 29
"Winterreise"
Live performance
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street
8:00pm

Austrian baritone Wolfgang Holzmair and pianist Russell Ryan perform Franz Schubert’s epic song cycle Winterreise. First published in 1828, Winterreise (Winter Journey) is a setting of two dozen poems by Wilhelm Müller.

Quoting from the Wiener Theaterzeitung: "[The poet] Müller is naive, sentimental, and sets against outward nature a parallel of some passionate soul-state which takes its colour and significance from the former. Schubert's music is as naive as the poet's expressions; the emotions contained in the poems are as deeply reflected in his own feelings, and these are so brought out in sound that no-one can sing or hear them without being touched to the heart."

Revisit the concert at the photo gallery.

A copy of the poster.


March 13
"Religion and the 'Nationalism' in Internationalism"
Colloquium
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
111 Thayer Street
2:00 - 4:00pm

Speaker Abdullahi An-Na'im, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law, School of Law at Emory University,  argues for the mediation of a paradox. On the one hand, the ethos of world religions, particularly Christianity and Islam, is more consistent with inclusive internationalism, than exclusive nationalism. On the other hand, historical exclusivity of these same religions have served nationalism more than internationalism.  The mediation the speaker addresses is how to transform the interpretation of these religions to support humane and inclusive internationalism of the 21st century.

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for links to the reading.

A copy of the flier.


March 20
"The International Politics of Religious Freedom"
Colloquium
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
111 Thayer Street
2:00 - 4:00pm

Speaker Elizabeth Hurd, Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University, addresses the question: Is it possible to generalize about what is being protected when states, courts and supra-national authorities such as the European Union, the United States, the Strasbourg Court, and the United Nations advocate and secure legal guarantees for religious freedom? The early 21st century is witnessing a dramatic proliferation of transnational projects dedicated to securing religious freedom.  This talk maps the global institutional architecture of religious freedom advocacy and explores the contentious politics surrounding these efforts.  Rather than view religious freedom as an unchanging standard or form of global law that imposes a set of universal rules, it approaches the production and promotion of religious freedom as situated sets of cultural practices that produce new understandings and actions, transforming the moral and political landscapes in which they intervene.  

Part of the Religion and Internationalism Project.

A copy of the flier.


March 21
"The Arab Quest for Freedom and Dignity: Have Arab Thinkers Been Part of It?"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:00pm

The recent Arab uprisings have been an unprecedented time of dramatic social and political movement. They have also been an intense moment of debate among both participants and witnesses of those historic events. One of the many questions raised in the debates has been the role of the intellectuals, if any, in predicting, contributing to and participating in these momentous changes. Have Arab thinkers, and particularly the critical thinkers among them, been in tune with the movements across the region? Or have they been totally disconnected from what was brewing within their own societies for many years, if not decades? What connections, if any, could be noted between contemporary Arab intellectual critique and contemporary Arab protestation?

Speaker Elizabeth Kassab is a Visiting Professor in the Humanities at the Cogut Center.

More information about Elizabeth Kassab.

A copy of the poster.


April 5
"Reign of Terroir in the Humanities — The Ideological Roots of Wine"
Lectures
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:30pm

Discussions of terroir among culinary professionals and artisanal food producers have intensified in the past two decades, helping to fuel academic interest in the regionalization of taste. Long thought by geologists and environmental scientists as embodying a direct correlation between the natural and gustatory worlds, scholars in the humanities are now critical of terroir’s often nationalist, exclusionist, and protectionist discourse. Speakers Rachel Black, Metropolitan College, Boston University, and Edward Korry, Culinary Arts, Johnson & Wales University will address this topic from different perspectives.

More information about this event.

A copy of the poster.

Photo gallery from the event.


April 9
Beethoven Recital
Pembroke Hall 305
12:30 - 2:00pm

Community MusicWorks violinists EmmaLee Holmes-Hicks and Ealain McMullin will perform Beethoven's Violin Sonata no.9 and Violin Sonata no. 10, accompanied by Benjamin Nacar '12 on piano. This is a free mid-day recital.

A copy of the flier.

Photo gallery of the event.


April 10
"A Practical Global Humanities:  Approaching a Vocabulary for Art and Advocacy"
Invitational Lecture in the Humanities
Pembroke Hall 305
6:00 - 7:30pm

Erik Ehn, Professor in Theatre Arts and Performance Studies at Brown University, presents the 2012 Invitational Lecture in the Humanities.

Art and Testimony, or Evidentiary Art: how do we articulate the capacities of art to incite social change, especially as directed towards justice? How do we need to expand or adapt our thinking (and our institutional frames) to embrace the field's changes in these directions and the rising demand of a student population increasingly interested in new networks and new missions? In the 1980s and '90s, performance labored to argue its relevance on the basis of economic models; have the arguments shifted to different ground?

More information on the Invitational Lecture.

A copy of the poster.

Watch the video of this year's lecture.


April 18
"Sentiment to Cinema: Revisiting Eisenstein on Dickens and Griffith"
Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

Speaker James Chandler, the Barbara E. & Richard J. Franke Distinguished Service Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago and Director of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, reflects on possibly the most influential piece of writing on the relation of film to literature, Sergei Eisenstein's 1944 essay, "Dickens, Griffith, and the Film Today."

The Frerichs Lecture is named for Sarah Cutts Frerichs AM'49 PhD'74, in support of lectures on topics related to the study of English culture of the Victorian period.

More information on this year's lecture and lecturer.

A copy of the poster.

Watch the video of this year's lecture.


April 19
"The Case of the Literary Spectator"
Frerichs Master Seminar
70 Brown Street, Barker Room
1:00 - 3:00pm

Speaker James Chandler will conduct a master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Vanessa Ryan.


April 30 and May 9
Liszt and Beethoven
Piano recital
Pembroke Hall 305
12:30 - 2:00pm

Benjamin Nacar '12 offers a solo piano performance of Liszt: Sonata in B minor and Beethoven/Liszt: Symphony no. 5 in C minor at two free mid-day recitals on April 30 and May 9.

A copy of the flier.


May 2
"Music, Religion, Nationalism"
Panel discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:00pm

Discussion of Johannes Brahms' A German Requiem, To Words of the Holy Scriptures, Op.45 (Ein deutsches Requiem, nach Worten der heiligen Schrift) on the occasion of its performance by the Rhode Island Philharmonic on May 5. Speakers include Larry Rachleff, conductor and musical director of the Rhode Island Philharmonic; Thomas A. Lewis, Religious Studies; and Michael P. Steinberg, Cogut Center for the Humanities.

A copy of the poster.



Co-Sponsored Events

September 22
"Chemical Weapons into Prayers to God: The Espelkamp Story"
Lecture
Barus and Holley 190
6:30pm

Dario Biocca, teaches European history at the University of Perugis and is coordinator of the School of Journalism at Perugia. Espelkamp was a labor camp in Nazi Germany and site of an important munitions factory. In the post-war era it has become a center for religious organizations. Prof. Biocca's publications include A Matter of Passion and Selected Letters of Bernard Berenson and Clotilde Marghieri. His new book on Antonio Gramsci is forthcoming.


September 22
"Paranoiac Illustrations and Dali's Aliyah"
Lecture
Brown RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
7:30pm

Brown RISD Hillel is hosting a visit of the touring exhibit "Aliyah: The Rebirth of Israel" collection by Salvador Dali. The exhibit comprises a set of 25 colored lithographs from his mixed-media paintings done to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel. Art historian and leading specialist in Dali's work, Elliott H. King, will deliver a public lecture on the artist and his work.

More information on the art exhibit.


September 26
"My Perestroika" (2010, Color, 90 mins.)
Film Screening and conversation with the filmmaker
Smith-Buonanno 106
7:00pm

The critically-acclaimed documentary film My Perestroika follows the lives of five Russians from childhood through the collapse of the Soviet Union during their teenage years and then into Post-Soviet life.  Using home footage from the 1970s and 1980s along with official propaganda films and contemporary interviews, the film portrays the complexity of the last years of the USSR and the first years of independent Russia.  

The film was an official selection at the Sundance Film Festival and numerous other film festivals.  The filmmaker Robin Hessman (Brown '94, Slavic Studies) will be on hand after the screening for Q&A with the audience.


October 5
"My Life as an Experiment: I came, I saw, I became part of the story"
Lecture
Brown Hillel
80 Brown Street
6:30pm

AJ Jacobs '90, author of The Know-It-All and The Year of Living Biblically will speak on personal journalism as part of the 2011-12 Gerat Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series.


October 13-15
"The Classics Renewed: The Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity"
Conference
Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
Full conference schedule

A prestigious group of international scholars will focus on Latin texts, Latin literary history, and Latin literary culture. Topics will also include late-antique and Christian visual arts, Roman political and military history, and Christian theology, as well as the use of poetry to advertise, appeal to, or resist political power; the role that poetry plays in preserving cultural identity, particularly in periods of political turmoil; and the interactions between religious and secular culture. 

This conference is funded in part by a Cogut Center Humanities Research Grant. The first half of this bi-coastal conference was held in spring 2011 at Rice University.


October 14-16
Merce Cunningham Dance Company
Fall semester residency
Theatre Arts and Performance Studies

For more information.


October 17 - November 6
"Visions of Liszt"
Film screening, concerts and symposium
Various locations on campus

The year 2011 marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Franz Liszt, the Hungarian-born composer and piano virtuoso best known for such pieces as Les Préludes, Liebestraum no. 3, the Hungarian Rhapsodies, and the Sonata in B-minor.

This series of events commemorates his music and achievements. All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.


October 19
"Before Racial Construction: Kant, Dermatology and the Racialization of Skin"
English Department, Barker Room 315
70 Brown Street
5:30pm

Speaker Irene Tucker, UC Irvine, works on Victorian culture and critical theory. This talk is part of a book project on epistemology, vision and the invention of race entitled Racial Site.


October 21-22
"Not On View"
Graduate symposium
List Art Center
64 College Street

This symposium will explore that which is concealed, hidden, or inaccessible in art and architecture, interrogating how scholars from across a wide array of related disciplines approach and engage what cannot be perceived with the senses. Keynote speaker will be Michael Ann Holly, Starr Director of Research and Academic Programs at the Clark Art Institute.

For a complete schedule.


October 31 - November 4
"REGENERATION"
Variety of events, times and locations

Butoh dancers, performers and writers Eiko and Koma will be in residence at Brown for one week, offering workshops for students, talks and performances.

October 31
11am - 1pm: Workshop for Stage Movement students in Ashamu Studio.

November 1
2:30 - 4:pm: Workshop for Advanced Modern Dance students in Ashamu Studio. 

November 2
11am - 1pm: Workshop for Stage Movement students in Ashamu

8pm: Performance by Eiko and Koma in Granoff Center, Studio 1. Profs. Forrest Gander, CD Wright and Julie Strandberg will moderate discussion with audience and performers after the performance.  

November 3
2:30 - 4pm: Workshop for Advanced Modern Dance students in Ashamu

8pm: Performance by Eiko and Koma in Granoff Center, Studio 1. Prof. Marcia Siegel (tentatively) will give a talk and moderate discussion with audience and performers after the performance.

November 4
10am - 12noon: Workshop for Stage Movement and Movement Collaboration students.  Professor Michelle Bach-Coulibaly presents film of Eiko and Koma to Dance Composition class.

November 5
"Theory on the Move: Three Decades of Critical Feminist Thinking"
Conference
Pembroke Hall 305
9:00am - 5:30pm

Scholars at the forefront of critical thinking have helped transform research agendas across the Academy. How have they raised new issues in their disciplines and recast critical feminist theory in the process? Please join us to explore how critical feminist theory has changed the very questions that scholars ask and compelled them to ground their research within interdisciplinary perspectives. Where will the future of critical feminist theory take us? Nine scholars, all former postdoctoral fellows with the Pembroke Center, will address these questions.

For more information.


November 9
Brown Emerging Writers' Panel
Panel discussion
Brown Hillel
80 Brown Street
6:30pm

The 2011-12 Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series offers a panel of Brown alumni to discuss their special areas of non-fiction writing: Kevin Roose '09 (Cultural Analysis), Lindsay Harrison '08 (Memoir), and Brian Christian '06 (Science/Culture).


November 10
David Lloyd Lecture
Brown Hillel
80 Brown Street
5:30pm

Speaker is David Lloyd, University of Southern California.

For more information.


November 12
"From Jerusalem to Constantinople: Byzantine Music for St. Catherine and Epiphany"
Live performance
Sayles Hall
7:30 - 9:00pm

Cappella Romana is a vocal chamber ensemble dedicated to combining passion with scholarship in its exploration of the musical traditions of the Christian East and West, with emphasis on early and contemporary music. Cappella Romana specializes in Byzantine and Slavic repertories in their original languages.


December 1
"Africana and the Fate of the Humanities"
Panel discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
4:00pm

This conversation will engage this issue with particular attention to the conditions of possibility whereby Africana Studies elaborates new conceptions of meaning and understanding that calls into question the current discourse about the crises of the humanities. Does Africana Studies reterritorialize the humanities and humanistic discourse in articulating intellectual practices that facilitate the emergence of a critical understanding of human being and belonging in the world?

Featured speakers: Carol Boyce Davies (Cornell University), Soyica Diggs (Dartmouth College), Regine Jean-Charles (Boston College), Lawrence P. Jackson (Emory), Jeffrey Ogbar (UConn - Assoc. Dean of the Humanities) and Brenda Marie Osbey (Brown and LSU).  Anthony Bogues will moderate.


February 13
"The Art of Reporting: From Investigative Projects to Columns, The Irreplaceable Value of Gathering Facts Before Writing"
Lecture
Location and Time: TBD

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist David Rohde '90 speaks as part of the 2011-12 Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series. David is the author of Endgame: The Betrayal and Fall of Srebrenica and A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides, which details the dramatic story of David's kidnapping by, and escape from, the Taliban in Afghanistan.


February 13
"Anyuan: Mining China's Revolutionary Tradition"
Lecture
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
5:30pm

Speaker Elizabeth J. Perry, Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government and Director of the Harvard-Yenching Institute, Harvard University, will explore the unexpected longevity of the Chinese Communist political system by examining the Chinese Communists’ creative development and deployment of cultural resources – during their revolutionary rise to power and afterwards. 


February 23
"Realism and Reality of Blood: City of God 10 Years Later"

Seminar
Pembroke Hall 202
12:00 - 2:00pm

Speaker Fabio Akcelrud Durão, Professor of Literary Theory at the University of Campinas (Unicamp), Sao Paolo, Brazil, will revisit Fernando Meirelles’s film City of God, ten years after its release. He will argue that the film is best read not as a medium for expressing the voice of the oppressed and for raising people’s consciousness, but as the inauguration of a new era in the history of Brazilian realist cinema, combining an entirely new degree of definition in the representation of popular reality with an unprecedented level of mastery over cinematic technique.

Prof. Durão's publications include Modernism and Coherence: Four Chapters of a Negative Aesthetics (Peter Lang, 2008), and two edited collections,  Culture Industry Today  (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010) and (with Dominic Williams) Modernist Group Dynamics: The Poetics and Politics of Friendship (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008).

For a copy of the pre-circulated reading.

For a copy of the flier.


February 26-27
"Cross-Cultural Connections in the Early Modern Jewish World"
Workshop
Hillel Foundation
80 Brown Street
Sunday: 10:30am - 6:45pm
Monday: 9:00am - 4:15pm

This workshop examines the nature of the connections between Jews and non-Jews in the early modern world as a cultural phenomenon in its own right. Its rationale derives from recent views that, wherever they settled, Jews were not a separate entity, but lived among non-Jews, drawing from, contributing to, influencing, and being influenced by the larger non-Jewish context.  Its goal will be to compare the different forms of Jewish-non Jewish contact – social, economic, cultural, and religious – in order to learn about the phenomenon of Jewish cross-cultural connections itself.   The transitory and fluid nature of early modernity, often characterized as an age of shifting cultural borders, led to a huge growth in the range of Jewish cross-cultural connections and so provides an excellent setting in which to examine the phenomenon as a whole.  Following contemporary conceptions of culture, which hold that it is best understood from its margins and regions of contestation, the workshop will provide new perspectives both on early modern Jewish history – its primary goal - and on the nature of early modern cultures in general.

A copy of this two-day workshop schedule.


February 28
"The Galleries for Islamic Art at the Met: Renovation and Revival"
Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
4:15pm

The Curator in Charge of the Islamic Art Department at the Metropolitan Museum, speaker Sheila Canby will discuss the Museum's Islamic art galleries recently reopened after eight years of renovation.


March 2-3
"Chiasmi"
Graduate Student Conference
Pembroke 305
Time: TBD

This conference will investigate the possible declinations of the concepts of veiling and unveiling, covering and uncovering in relation to Italy. What role do these dynamics play in the Italian context? In what ways do they unfold in Italian history, literature, politics, art, philosophy, cinema, theater, etc?

For more information.


March 5
Jonathan Goldberg lecture
2011 Graduate Student Zucker Lecture
Brown Hillel
70 Brown Street
5:30pm

Speaker Jonathan Goldberg is the Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor at Emory University. His writing explores connections between the early modern and modern periods, especially in conjunction with queer theory and the intersections of race and sexuality.

For more information.


March 8
J. Carter Brown Lecture
Salomon 101
Main Green
6:00pm

Speaker Bjarke Ingels, Danish architect and founder and head of Bjarke Ingels Group is currently a visiting professor at Harvard University Graduate School of Design.


March 16-18
"Authenticity, Origins, and Authority in the Practice and Study of Religion"
Graduate Student Conference
Times and locations: TBD

Conference organized by the graduate students in Religious Studies. Keynote address will be delivered by Bruce Lincoln, University of Chicago. For more information, visit.


March 17-18
"Chinese Women's Documentaries in the Market Era"
Film Festival
Cable Car Cinema
204 South Main Street

"Chinese Women’s Documentaries in the Market Era" will screen and examine important documentary films by Chinese Women directors from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China. The symposium will feature directors and international scholars who will discuss the role and significance of women’s documentary films in articulating different human concerns, critical visions, and visual aesthetics in the rapidly changing Greater China area.

More information about these events.


March 29 - April 1
"Collapse/Catastrophe/Change"
2012 ACLA Conference
Various campus locations

The American Comparative Literature Association’s annual conference will convene at Brown University this year. ACLA conferences have a distinctive structure in which most papers are grouped into twelve-person seminars that meet two hours per day for the three days of the conference to foster extended discussion.

For more information.


April 9
"Passion Lost, Passion Regained: On the Love of the World in Heidegger and Arendt"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 202
12:00 - 2:00pm

Speaker Dieter Thomä is a professor of philosophy at the Universität of St. Gallen (Switzerland) and is the author of numerous influential books – on such topics as Heidegger; totality and pity in Richard Wagner and Eisenstein; fatherhood; parenthood; the problem of happiness; and the American way of life as interpreted from a European perspective. He also contributes regularly to leading European newspapers such as Süddeutsche Zeitung and Neue Zürcher Zeitung.


April 13-14
"Craving Happiness, Containing Anxiety"
Graduate conference
Smith-Buonanno Hall 106

Keynote address by Elaine Tyler May (University of Minnesota) at 5pm on April 13. Panels begin at 9am on April 14.

For a complete schedule.


April 17
"Symbols of Resistance: The Legacy of Artists Under the Chilean Dictator Augusto Pinochet"
Lecture
Watson Center 165
6:00pm

Speaker Joanne Pottlitzer, author, playwright and two-time Obie Award recipient, will speak on the influence of artists on the political process during the Chilean dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.


May 7
"Writing—and Rewriting— Our New Global Swirl"
Lecture
Location: TBD
6:30pm

Pico Iyer, author of The Global Soul, The Open Road, and Falling Off the Map, will deliver the Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture as part of the 2011-12 Great Nonfiction Writers Lecture Series.


June 14-16
"Material Cultures in the Space Between, 1914- 1945"
Conference
Pembroke Hall 305
All day meetings

Sponsored by the interdisciplinary humanities organization, the Space Between society, which supports work on the period between World Wars I and II. This year's conference will bring together about 100 scholars working internationally in literature, art history, museum studies, thing theory, photography and radio studies. The papers being delivered are international in their objects of study, ranging from British radio and French surrealism, to Italian tourism, Egyptian department stores, and American antiquarianism along with literary texts from a range of nations.