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Courses in the Department of Music

SPRING 2014

FALL 2014

SPRING 2015

Prospective students may visit classes marked with (). Students are asked to speak with the instructor before class. In most cases, instructors prefer that only students come into the class, and that they remain for the duration of the class.

Course Offerings for Spring 2014

New courses and/or visiting faculty this semester!

Grad student Aleysia Whitmore will be teaching new course MUSC0043 Music of Africa.
Grad student Peter Bussigel will be teaching new course MUSC0211 Systems for Play
Visiting Professor John Ferguson will be teaching new course
MUSC 1240G Topics in New Media Theory and Production:
Post-vernacular Composition/‘Pop Music’ gone Feral
MEME PhD graduate Shawn Greenlee will be teaching MUSC1240E Experimental Data Representation. Interested students should register for MCM 1700U S01
Mohsen Namjoo will be teaching new course MUSC1936 Tradition and Protest: Persian and Iranian Music[interested students should register for MES 1000]

MUSC0043 Music of Africa
How do Senegalese rappers mix traditional and African American musical meanings and traditions? How did drumming and dancing traditions become emblematic of the African continent abroad? How did South African musicians challenge apartheid? This course explores the diversity of popular and traditional musics on the African continent. Approaching music as inextricably linked to culture, students will explore how musics live in communities and interact with issues such as globalization, race, and nationalism. Framing their study within the fields of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, cultural studies, and history, students develop practical and theoretical bases for the study of music and culture.
T,Th 9:00-10:20 a.m. (A. Whitmore) Orwig 109

MUSC 0052 Beethoven
A study of Beethoven’s life and music.
T,Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (D. Josephson) Orwig 315

MUSC 0075 Jazz and American Culture
Explores jazz in relation to American history, discussing how economics, war conditions, regional differences and race relations shaped the music an its public reception. With readings from A. Baraka, L. Levine, R. Ellison, L. Erenberg, E. Lott, G. Early, S. DeVeaux and others, we address how jazz embodies social and political values or expresses national character. Open to non-musicians. Music proficiency preferred but not required. Enrollment limited to 60.
M,W,F 11:00-11:50 a.m. (D. Gooley) Orwig 315

MUSC 0210E Topics in Electronic Music and Multimedia: Systems for Play
Complex patterns emerge while playing with simple processes. This course focuses on systems as creative constraints and sites for composing sound and other materials. Amplifying, multiplying, delaying, cutting, folding, growing and randomizing become lenses for animating our practices and playgrounds for exploring tendencies (our own, the materials’, the systems’). Assignments are project-based and informed by short readings. There are no prerequisites and enrollment is limited to 18.
Tues 4:00-6:20 p.m. (P. Bussigel) Granoff N430

MUSC 0400 Introduction to Music Theory
An introduction to musical terms, elements, and techniques, including notation, intervals, scales and modes, triads and seventh chords, modulation, melody writing and harmonization, analysis, and composition. Ear-training and sight-singing are included. For students with some musical training. Enrollment limited to 40.
M,W,F 10:00-10:50 a.m. (E. Kurtz/K. Haughey) Orwig 315

MUSC 0560 Theory of Tonal Music
MUSC0550 is a prerequisite to MUSC0560. Enrollment limited. Written permission required. LL
T,Th (S01) 1:00-2:20 p.m. (M. Steinbach) Orwig 315
T,Th (S02) 1:00-2:20 p.m. (A. Aziz) Steinert 105
M,W,F (Lab) 9:00-9:50 a.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315
M,W (Lab) 12:00-12:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315
F (Lab) 12:00-12:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Steinert 105

MUSC 0920 Baroque and Classic Music
A history of music in European society from Monteverdi's opera Orfeo to Beethoven's Ninth, studied through texts, scores, CDs, DVDs, and YouTube. We'll spend two-thirds of our time on five composers: Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Prerequisite: MUSC0550 or equivalent.
T/Th 2:30-3:50 p.m. (D. Josephson) Orwig 109

MUSC 1011 Advanced Musicianship II
Continuation of MUSC1010. Prerequisite: MUSC1010 or permission of the instructor. Written permission required.
M,W,F 2:00-2:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315

MUSC1040 Advanced Music Theory I
A study of chromaticism and advanced tonal techniques, with a focus on 19th-century European art music. Assignments will include exercises in analysis and composition and in-class presentations. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560.
M,W,F 1:00-1:50 p.m. (A. Aziz) Orwig 315

MUSC 1110 Seminar in Composition
Finding a personal voice as a composer. Assignments develop familiarity with large forms and increasingly complex structures. Analyses of contemporary compositions elucidate issues of aesthetic and political stance inherent in compositional activity and teach technical facility and range of expression. Problems of rehearsal and performance for new music are considered. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 and 1100, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.
Wed. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (G. Shapiro) Orwig 112

MUSC 1120 Technique of Orchestration
Introduction to standard instrumentation; exercises in basic principles; analysis of styles of scoring. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 or permission of instructor.
T,Th 1:00-2:20 p.m. (G. Shapiro) Orwig 112

MUSC 1200 Seminar in Electronic Music: The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool
A study of advanced studio techniques taught in parallel with topics in psychoacoustics. Students will create original studio work while developing listening and technical skills for audio production. Technical topics include recording, signal processing and mixing software, microphone technique, and live sound engineering. Class size is limited. Preference will be given to students who have completed MUSC 0200. Students will be evaluated for potential future work in the MEME program (Multimedia and Electronic Music Experiments) and past participation in MEME. Admission is determined by an entrance questionnaire completed at the first class meeting. Prerequisite: MUSC 0200
T,Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (J. Moses) Steinert 205

MUSC 1240B Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Narrative and Immersion
A production course examining the potentials for engagement in new media installations. The course draws on techniques of narrative to establish engagement in immersive environments. Students will be introduced to cinematic concepts, interactive technologies, multi-channel video and surround sound environments. Class meetings will consist of viewing and analysis of exemplary work, discussion of readings, and critiques of student projects. An additional 1-hour technical workshop will be devoted to learning Jitter. Class members should have completed advanced work in film/video, digital sound, and/or creative writing. Open to upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students. The final class list will be determined after the first class meeting, by permission of instructor. S/NC
Wed. 1:00-4:50 p.m. (M. Cetilia) Granoff N430

MUSC 1240E Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Experimental Data Representation
[interested students should register for MCM 1700U S01]
Experimental Data Representation (EDR) focuses on generatively composed, multimedia experiences utilizing the large-scale, video wall within the Digital Scholarship Lab. This interdisciplinary course brings together students from Brown and RISD to explore the creation of screen-based visualizations via programs authored by course participants. EDR provides a platform for students to examine and design ways in which experiential variables (as output) may be algorithmically determined by data sets (as input). Readings and projects will engage areas such statistical graphics, cartography, multimodal interaction, data visualization, sonification, and media art. Instruction will be offered in programming environments: NodeBox, Processing, Max/MSP, and Pure Data.Enrollment limited to 14 (7 Brown Students and 7 RISD students) Final class list will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. Enrollment S/NCPrevious Experience with one or more of the listed programming environments recommended.
Mon. 2:00-5:50 p.m. (S. Greenlee) Digital Scholarship Lab Rockefeller Library

MUSC 1240G Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Post-vernacular Composition/‘Pop Music’ gone Feral
This seminar explores the fertile creative territory found around the more adventurous edges of ‘popular’ musics. The course will focus on non-notated contemporary composition, but this need not be restricted to the recording studio, or to the production of ‘fixed’ works. The idea of post-vernacular is utilised to challenge the view that vernacular musics are only oriented towards commercialism and mass popularity. It seeks to extend and develop the inherently experimental dimensions of much vernacular musical practice. Students will respond to a number of increasingly open-ended assignments, and will explore cultural and aesthetic considerations via a portfolio of practical and theoretical work. Permission of instructor is required.
T/Th 2:30-3:50 p.m. (J. Ferguson) Steinert 205

MUSC 1500A Major Masters and Repertoires of Music: Bach
An examination of the life and work of Bach, including its place in German church music, views of his contemporaries and explanation of his manuscript and publishing history.
T/Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (F. Jodry) Orwig 112

MUSC 1690C Seminar in Jazz Studies: John Coltrane
Saxophone virtuoso and composer, John Coltrane, pursued a life-long study of music that was driven by unparalleled energy, formed by a powerful intellectual curiosity and shaped by a deeply personal spirituality. By learning to sing and transcribe Coltrane’s music and by reading biographical, theoretical and critical materials, we will chronicle his personal, spiritual and musical development and investigate his influence on American culture, emphasizing Coltrane's position within the music industry, his leadership role in the Civil Rights movement and his impact on Jazz education. Prerequisite: MUSC0550 or permission. Enrollment limited to 20.
Thurs. 4:00-6:20 p.m. (M. McGarrell) Orwig 109

MUS 1920 Music and Modern Life
Examines topics related to the everyday use of music: the determinants of musical taste; music for emotional self-management (in the health club or Iraq War); "high" vs. "low" music; eclectic taste; popular music and the music industry; mp3blogs; new business models. Readings (in sociology, history, and cultural studies) and original field research by class members. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.
Thurs. 4:00-6:20 p.m. (M. Perlman) Orwig 112

MUSC 1930 Music of Indonesia
The traditional music of Java, Bali, and Sumatra, with special attention to the bronze percussion orchestras (gamelan) and their use in ritual, dance, and drama. Topics include: music and trance; the impact of colonialism; nationalism, modernization, and tourism; and Indonesian music and "world beat." Theory and practice are integrated through extensive instruction on Brown's gamelan instruments. Enrollment limited to 20.
T,Th 1:00-2:20 p.m. (M. Perlman) Orwig 109

MUSC1936 Tradition and Protest: Persian and Iranian Music[interested students should register for MES 1000]
This course examines Persian and Iranian approaches to tradition and protest in two parts. The first part of the course will focus on traditional music from Iran. The students of this course will learn the basic cultural and musical traditions underpinning Persian/Iranian musical styles. Through directed reading and listening, and occasional in-class performance by the instructor, students will become familiar with the primary characteristics of Iran’s classical music traditions and instruments, learn relevant musical concepts and terminology, and develop critical listening skills. The second phase of this course will examine how modern Iranian musicians are disrupting these traditional concepts as a form of musical and conceptual protest, thereby making the music relevant to modern listeners while fundamentally changing conceptions of classical poetry in the process. No instrumental experience required.
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (M. Namjoo) Location TBD

MUSC 2080E Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Historiography of Music and the Performing Arts
Advanced seminar in methods of historical research and their relevance to the interpretation of music, the performing arts, and culture. Readings include Foucault, Collingwood, Schorske, Said, Adorno, Pierre Nora and Diana Taylor, as well as musicological essays by Taruskin, DeVeaux, Nettl, Tomlinson, Treitler, Lawrence Kramer, Susan McClary, Kerman, and Nicholas Cook. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (D. Gooley) Orwig 109

MUSC 2090B Seminar in Ethnomusicology: World Music in Theory and Practice
This seminar investigates "world music" as a contested term in ethnomusicology, a music-industry marketing category, and a college classroom subject. We will read critical accounts of the development and significance of the "world music" concept, compare several world music textbooks, experiment with teaching the exercises/assignments therein, and explore the scholarly literature on multiculturalist pedagogy. Prerequisite: graduate standing or written permission.
Wed. 12:30-2:50 p.m. (K. Miller) Orwig 109

MUSC 2220 Design and Playing Alternative Controllers
This seminar will explore the science and aesthetics of designing alternate controllers for musical performance. Topics will include basic electronics and hardware prototyping, instrument construction, theories of gesture, human-computer interface issues, and the challenges of mapping sensor data to meaningful musical parameters. Previous experience with MaxMSP or other real-time programming required. Permission of instructor required.
M,W 10:00-11:20 a.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff S310
Wed. (Lab) 11:30-12:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff S310

MUSC 2280 Designing Large-Scale Multimedia Projects
A production seminar designed for students working on a single, large project in Multimedia and/or Computer Music. The course covers planning and implementation strategies, with group critiques of proposals and works-in-progress. The class structure includes individual lessons for students working on a graduate or undergraduate thesis project. Permission will be granted based upon a questionnaire given in the first class. Enrollment is limited. Written permission required. May be repeated for credit.
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (J. Ferguson) Steinert 205

Performance Offerings - Spring 2014

MUSC 0221 Electroacoustic Improv Ensemble (Half-credit each semester) An ensemble devoted to free improvisation with new media. Experimental approaches to sound and focused listening techniques are explored with acoustic instruments, live electronics, real-time video, together with networked improvisation, and more. By auition. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Wed. 7:00-9:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff N430

MUSC 0601 Chorus (Half credit each semester) A practical study of choral literature, techniques, and performance practice from Gregorian chant to the present, offered through rehearsals, sectionals, and performance. Reading and listening assignments may be required. Enrollment by audition, based on voice quality, experience, and music-reading ability. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:30-8:20 p.m. (F. Jodry) Steinert 105

MUSC 0611 Orchestra (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the orchestral repertory from Bach to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Tues, Thurs. 7:15-9:45 p.m. (Staff) Alumnae Hall

MUSC 0621 Wind Symphony (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the wind band repertory from Mozart to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:00-7:20 p.m. (M); 6:00-8:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall

MUSC 0631 Jazz Band (Half credit each semester) A practical study of jazz from the 1920s to the present through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Seminars on arranging, ear training, and improvisation are conducted for interested students but the focus is on performance. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists and vocalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
MUSC 0631 S01 Mon, Thurs 7:30-8:50 p.m. (M); 6:10-7:20 p.m. (Th) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall
MUSC 0631 S02 8:00-9:20 p.m. (T) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0631 S03 2:00-3:20 (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0631 S04 4:00-5:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC0631 S05 4:00-5:20 p.m. (F) (M. McGarrell) Arr.

MUSC 0641 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) A dynamic introductory course on drumming, dancing, and singing of Ghana and the diaspora. Students learn to perform diverse types of African music, including Ewe, Akan, Ga, and Dagomba pieces on drums, bells, and shakers. No prerequisites. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limit 15.
Wed. 5:00-7:20 p.m. (Sec.01) (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC 0651 Javanese Gamelan (Half credit each semester) Instruction, rehearsals and performances of the music of Indonesia using the Department's Javanese gamelan ensemble, "Sekar Setaman." The Javanese gamelan is an orchestra consisting of gongs, bronze metallophones, xylophones, drums, a flute, singers, and a bowed string instrument. No prerequisite. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Tues. 6:00-8:50 p.m. (I.M. Harjito) Orwig 111

MUSC 0661 Sacred Harp/Shape-Note Singing (Half credit each semester) Students will learn the traditional performance practices associated with the shape-note tunebook The Sacred Harp, a compilation of American vernacular hymnody first published in Georgia in 1844. This is an unaccompanied, four-part, participatory singing tradition. Ability to read Western music notation helpful but not required. No concert performances. No prerequisites. Repeatable for credit. S/NC.
Thurs. 5:00-6:50 p.m. (K. Miller) Steinert 105

MUSC 0681 Chamber Music Performance (Half credit each semester) The practical study of the literature of chamber music through participation in a small ensemble. Regular rehearsals, coaching by department staff, and performances are required. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Arr. (L. Finkel)

MUSC 1961 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) Students with experience in African and related musical traditions perform drumming, dancing, and singing of Ghana and the diaspora. Focus on a more challenging repertoire with emphasis on multi-part, lead, and improvisational playing. Prerequisite: audition. May be repeatable for credit. Written permission required.
Wed. 7:30-10:00 p.m. (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC 0810, 1810 Applied Music Program: Instruction in Vocal or Instrumental Music (Half-Credit each semester) Openings are limited. Enrollment and re-enrollment is by audition and jury. Lessons are given by consultants to the Applied Music Program. A fee is charged for enrollment. Copies of the Applied Music Program Guidelines giving detailed information are available online at www.brown.edu/music. Instructor’s permission required. Repeatable for credit four times on the same instrument. NOTE: MUSC0810 is restricted to skilled musicians. MUSC1810 is restricted to skilled musicians demonstrating mastery of an advanced repertory in their fields. Prerequisite for MUSC1810: MUSC 0400, MUSC 0550, or MUSC 0560.
Arr. (Staff)

 

Course Offerings for Fall 2014

MUSC 0021G First Year Seminar: Duke Ellington
This class will be an examination of the life and work of Duke Ellington. We will use recordings, scores, films, autobiographies, interviews, oral histories and other primary source materials as well as biographical, theoretical and analytical readings to study Ellington's three careers: the composer, the performer and the band leader. We will analyze his work largely within the musical parameters of form, improvisation techniques, orchestration, instrumentation, rhythmic and chordal structures, and concepts of tone quality. Although musical literacy is not required for this course, students who so want may receive tutorials in the rudiments of theory and score reading. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS
Thurs 4:00-6:20 p.m. (M. McGarrell) Orwig 109

MUSC 0040 World Music Cultures (Africa, America, Europe, Oceania)
A survey of a variety of musical styles from Africa, the Americas, Europe, and Oceania outside the Western art music tradition. Introduces these musics in their historical, social, and cultural context, in an attempt to understand them in their own theoretical systems and aesthetic frameworks. DP
M,W,F 10:00-10:50 a.m. (F. Inglese) Orwig 112

MUSC 0200 Computers and Music
An introduction to the field of computer music, focusing on the use of electronics and computers in music and performance. Investigates basic acoustics, perception of sound, the history of music technology, and musical applications. Extensive listening assignments illustrate the impact of technology on popular and experimental genres. No prerequisites, though some experience with computers and some knowledge of music is very helpful. Significant hands-on experience with computer music systems. Enrollment limited to 80 students. Permission will be granted based on a questionnaire given in the first class, with preference given to lower-level students.
T,Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (T. Winkler) Granoff 110

MUSC 0400 Introduction to Music Theory
An introduction to musical terms, elements, and techniques, including notation, intervals, scales and modes, triads and seventh chords, modulation, melody writing and harmonization, analysis, and composition. Ear-training and sight-singing are included. For students with some musical training. Enrollment limited to 40.
M,W,F 11:00-11:50 a.m. (B. Fugate) Orwig 315

MUSC 0550 Theory of Tonal Music
For students with knowledge of the rudiments of music, including scales, intervals, and key signatures. Knowledge of keyboard strongly recommended. Prerequisite to the music concentration. Intensive study of tonal harmony, voice leading; analysis, ear training, sight-singing, keyboard exercises. A placement test will be administered on the first day of class in Orwig 315. Instructor permission required. MUSC 0550 is prerequisite to MUSC 0560.
T,Th (S01) 10:30-11:50 a.m. (M. Steinbach) Orwig 315
T,Th (S02) 1:00-2:20 p.m. (M. Steinbach) Steinert 105
M,W,F (Lab) 9:00-9:50 a.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315
M,W,F (Lab) 12:00-12:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315 MW / Steinert 105 F

MUSC 0930 Romantic and Modern Music
A history of European and American art music from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony to the Postmodernists. Prerequisite: MUSC 0550 or permission of instructor.
T,Th 1:00-2:20 p.m. (Staff) Orwig 109

MUSC 1010 Advanced Musicianship I
Training in advanced musicianship skills relevant to Western art music from the sixteenth Century to the present, including sight singing, ear training, score reading, keyboard harmony, improvisation, and musical transcription. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560.
M,W,F 2:00-2:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315

MUSC 1020 Modal Counterpoint
An introduction to contrapuntal techniques of the 16th century with particular attention to the music of Lassus and Palestrina. Two hours per week of ear training and sight singing. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560.
T,Th 10:d0-11:50 a.m. (Staff) Orwig 112

MUSC 1100 Introduction to Composition
Composition students begin by using technical resources developed in their previous theoretical studies. Analysis and discussion of contemporary music provides examples of alternatives to traditional compositional strategies, which students integrate into later assignments. A study of contemporary notational practices and computer-based manuscripting and sequencing is also included. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
T,Th 2:30-3:50 p.m. (Staff) Orwig 112

MUSC 1210 Seminar in Electronic Music: Real-Time Systems
Seminar in Electronic Music is a study of music employing electronic media, including real-time digital signal processing, multimedia, and live performance. Technical aspects of the course focus on programming using Max/MSP to create interactive projects and algorithmic compositions. Permission of instructor required. Interested students must come to the first class. Preference will be given to students who have completed MUSC 0200.
T,Th 1:00-2:20 p.m. (J. Rovan) Grant Recital Hall
Fri. (Lab) 3:00-3:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Steinert 101

MUSC 1240F Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Circuit Bending and Hardware Hacking as Musical and Artistic Expression
Creative experimentation with hardware electronics and re-appropriated technologies is the main focus of this course. No prior experience of electronics is required. Initially, we will build a range of simple electronic circuits and explore a variety of strategies to animate and interpret pre-existing electronic devices. Students will then develop individual instruments and/or performance environments and engage in a number of solo and collaborative projects. The aesthetics of handmade electronic music and post-digital performance practice will be foregrounded throughout. Permission of instructor is required.
Thurs. 4:00pm - 6:20pm (J. Ferguson) Granoff S310

MUSC 1260 Seminar in Electronic Music: Advanced Studio Composition
This course will focus on developing and reinforcing technical skills, musical concepts, and critical listening abilities associated with the practice of composition in an electronic music studio. These studies will be tied to a broad range of aesthetic approaches and discussions of sound synthesis and manipulation, spatialization, and recording techniques.Through a series of projects and focused study, students will expand their knowledge and craft, and will provide each other with a forum for exploring their creative studio work. MUSC 0200 is a prerequisite, and preference will be given to students who have previously taken MUSC 1200, 1210, and/or 1250.
M,W,F 10:00-10:50 a.m. (J. Moses) Granoff 306

MUSC 1640D Seminar in Opera Studies: History, Theory Practice
This seminar will analyze the history, theory, and practice of opera in its textual (words and music), and performative (in the theater and in society) dimensions. We will focus paradigmatic works of Mozart, Verdi, and Wagner alongside key works in philosophy, cultural theory, and gender/performance/opera studies. We will also discuss the genesis and implementation of key productions. In addition, each student will select a 20th or 21st-century work for individual research and presentation to the group.
Wed. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (M. Steinberg) Orwig 109

MUSC 1710 Choral Conducting
From the revolutionary era of the late eighteenth century through the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, music and religion have been complexly interwoven with the political struggles of modernity. Focusing on Germany, the course asks, How have the relations between religion and the arts, particularly music, shifted in Western modernity? Has music come to perform functions—providing consolation or uniting a people—formerly associated closely with religion? How have music and religion informed notions of national identity? How have they functioned as sites of political resistance? How central is myth to the three key concepts of the course?
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (L. Jodry) Steinert 105

MUSC 1900 Introduction to Ethnomusicology
The study of people making music. Ethnographic research and writing on musical practices; history of ethnomusicology; musical case studies from around the world highlighting such issues as authenticity, tradition, commercialism, amateurism, postcolonial politics, and the ethics of fieldwork. Prerequisite: MUSC0550 or written permission.
T,Th 9:00-10:20 a.m. (C. Tucker) Orwig 109

MUSC 1935 Beyond Bossa Nova: Braziilian Music and Society
With a musical culture that ranges from roots samba to favela funk, and from the music of indigenous Amazonian peoples to the neo-African sounds of candomblé ritual, Brazil’s soundscape rivals its social and geographic diversity. This course provides an introduction to the "erudite," traditional, and mass-popular sounds of Brazil, emphasizing their role in creating and contesting visions of nationhood and Brazilian society over the twentieth century. There are no prerequisites, but a background in either music or Latin American studies will greatly aid students' progress in the course. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. DPLL LILE
T,Th 2:30-3:50 p.m. (C. Tucker) Orwig 109

MUSC 2270B Performance in a Virtual World
A co-taught production course exploring emerging technology in the context of live performance, focusing ontechniques where the body appears both on stage and on screen.What does it mean to be “live” in a virtual world, and how does that impact movement, interaction and expression? Students participate in a series of hands-on workshops that examine embodied performance using projections, motion capture, video processing, and sound design, along with various interactive and immersive techniques. The course culminates in a public performance of new works created in collaborative groups.Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Permission required.
Wed. 1:00-4:50 p.m. (T. Winkler/K. Moore) Steinert 205

MUSC 2230 Composing and Improvising with Real-Time Systems
In probing the relationship between humans, interfaces, and sonic materials, this seminar will consider: how useful are established notions of composition and improvisation in a contemporary ‘real-time’ age? The overall aim is to develop conceptual discussion and practical experimentation, which will culminate in (at least) two concerts and a variety of web-based outputs, as well as a short piece of reflective writing. It is possible to navigate this course using a variety of software/hardware systems (Ableton Live, Max, PD, turntables, home-brew electronics, etc); and a diverse approach to a variety of technologies is highly encouraged.
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (J. Ferguson) Steinert 205

Performance Offerings - Fall 2014

MUSC 0220 Electroacoustic Improv Ensemble (Half credit each semester) An ensemble devoted to free improvisation with new media. Experimental approaches to sound and focused listening techniques are explored with acoustic instruments, live electronics, real-time video, together with networked improvisation, and more. By audition. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Wed. 7:00-9:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Steinert 205

MUSC 0600 Chorus (Half credit each semester) A practical study of choral literature, techniques, and performance practice from Gregorian chant to the present, offered through rehearsals, sectionals, and performance. Reading and listening assignments may be required. Enrollment by audition, based on voice quality, experience, and music-reading ability. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:30-8:20 p.m. (L. Jodry) Steinert 105

MUSC 0610 Orchestra (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the orchestral repertory from Bach to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Tues, Thurs. 7:15-9:45 p.m. (P. Phillips) Alumnae Hall

MUSC 0620 Wind Symphony (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the wind band repertory from Mozart to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:00-7:20 p.m. (M); 6:00-8:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall

MUSC 0630 Jazz Band (Half credit each semester) A practical study of jazz from the 1920s to the present through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Seminars on arranging, ear training, and improvisation are conducted for interested students but the focus is on performance. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists and vocalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
MUSC 0630 S01 Mon, Thurs 7:30-8:50 p.m. (M); 6:10-7:20 p.m. (Th) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall
MUSC 0630 S02 8:00-9:20 p.m. (T) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0630 S03 2:00-3:20 (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0630 S04 4:00-5:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0630 S05 4:00-5:20 p.m. (F) (M. McGarrell) Arr.

MUSC 0640 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) A dynamic course in the performance of contemporary drumming and dancing styles of West Africa. Students learn to perform diverse ceremonial and recreational music from Ghana through rehearsals, discussions, readings and listening. No prerequisites. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 15. Written permission required. Half credit each semester.
Wed. 5:00-7:20 p.m. (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC0645 Brazilian Choro Ensemble (Half credit each semester) Students will play this popular Brazilian style, which emerged in the late 19th century and is often compared to early jazz. Classes run according to the traditional roda model, a structured jam session where performers read through, improvise upon, and hone their abilities to play familiar tunes. Prior familiarity with choro music not required, but some instrumental expertise is; ability to read notation preferred. Typical instruments include guitar, cavaquinho (Brazilian ukulele), mandolin, flute, and pandeiro (Brazilian tambourine), but others are welcome to participate on instructor approval, as are performers interested in learning these. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20. Repeatable for credit. S/NC.
Mon. 5:30-7:00 p.m. (J. Tucker) Orwig 301

MUSC 0650 Javanese Gamelan (Half credit each semester) Instruction, rehearsals and performances of the music of Indonesia using the Department's Javanese gamelan ensemble, "Sekar Setaman." The Javanese gamelan is an orchestra consisting of gongs, bronze metallophones, xylophones, drums, a flute, singers, and a bowed string instrument. No prerequisite. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Tues. 6:00-8:50 p.m. (I.M. Harjito) Orwig 111

MUSC 0670 Old-Time String Band (Half credit each semester) Southern Appalachian Mountain music on such acoustic instruments as fiddle (violin), banjo, mandolin, and guitar. Music taught by ear. Prerequisite: audition during first class. May be repeated once for credit.
Tues. 7:00-8:50 p.m. (S.Astrausky/R. MacLeod) Orwig 301

MUSC 0680 Chamber Music Performance (Half credit each semester) The practical study of the literature of chamber music through participation in a small ensemble. Regular rehearsals, coaching by department staff, and performances are required. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Arr. (P. Phillips)

MUSC 1960 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) Building on the knowledge and skills required in MUSC 640/641, students will learn to perform a more challenging and specialized repertoire of contemporary drumming and dancing styles of West Africa, through more advanced rehearsals, discussions, readings and listening. Prerequisite: 67/68 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 15. Written permission required. Half credit each semester.
Wed. 7:30-9:50 p.m. (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC 0810/1810 Applied Music Program: Instruction in Vocal or Instrumental Music (Half-Credit each semester) Openings are limited. Enrollment and re-enrollment is by audition and jury. Lessons are given by consultants to the Applied Music Program. A fee is charged for enrollment. Copies of the Applied Music Program Guidelines giving detailed information are available online at www.brown.edu/music. Instructor’s permission required. Repeatable for credit four times on the same instrument. NOTE: MUSC 0810 is restricted to skilled musicians. MUSC 1810 is restricted to skilled musicians demonstrating mastery of an advanced repertory in their fields. Prerequisite for MUSC 1810: MUSC 0400, MUSC 0550, or MUSC 0560.
Arr. (Staff)

 

Course Offerings for Spring 2015

MUSC 0064 Honky Tonk Heroes
This course explores country music from its origins to the present day. We will trace its development through the careers of foundational artists like the Carter Family, Hank Williams, Loretta Lynn, and Willie Nelson, and evaluate the way that their legacy is reflected in the work of contemporary artists like Corb Lund, Hayes Carll, and Neko Case. Beyond the individual creativity of these figures, we will consider the way that country music has been shaped by the recording industry, the relation it has to race, gender, and political identities, and the international spread of the American country sound.
M,W,F 11:00-11:50 a.m. (C. Tucker) Orwig 315

MUSC 0400 Introduction to Music Theory
An introduction to musical terms, elements, and techniques, including notation, intervals, scales and modes, triads and seventh chords, modulation, melody writing and harmonization, analysis, and composition. Ear-training and sight-singing are included. For students with some musical training. Enrollment limited to 40.
M,W,F 10:00-10:50 a.m. (Grad Staff) Orwig 315

MUSC 0560 Theory of Tonal Music
MUSC0550 is a prerequisite to MUSC0560. Enrollment limited. Written permission required. LL
T,Th (S01) 1:00-2:20 p.m. (M. Steinbach) Orwig 315
T,Th (S02) 1:00-2:20 p.m. (P. Phillips) Steinert 105
M,W,F (Lab) 9:00-9:50 a.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315
M,W (Lab) 12:00-12:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315
F (Lab) 12:00-12:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Steinert 105

MUSC 0910 Medieval and Renaissance Music
A history of music in European society from Monteverdi's opera Orfeo to Beethoven's Ninth, studied through texts, scores, CDs, DVDs, and YouTube. We'll spend two-thirds of our time on five composers: Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Prerequisite: MUSC0550 or equivalent.
T/Th 10:30-11:50 p.m. (L. Jodry) Orwig 315

MUSC 1011 Advanced Musicianship II
Continuation of MUSC1010. Prerequisite: MUSC1010 or permission of the instructor. Written permission required.
M,W,F 2:00-2:50 p.m. (A. Cole) Orwig 315

MUSC1050 Advanced Music Theory II
A study of theories of Western art music since Debussy. Exercises in analysis and composition, focusing on works of Debussy, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Webern, Bartok and Ives. Students give presentations on selected later composers. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 with grade of B, or the equivalent.
M,W,F 11:00-11:50 a.m. (Staff) Orwig 109

MUSC 1110 Seminar in Composition
Finding a personal voice as a composer. Assignments develop familiarity with large forms and increasingly complex structures. Analyses of contemporary compositions elucidate issues of aesthetic and political stance inherent in compositional activity and teach technical facility and range of expression. Problems of rehearsal and performance for new music are considered. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 and 1100, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students.
Wed. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (Staff) Orwig 109

MUSC 1120 Technique of Orchestration
Introduction to standard instrumentation; exercises in basic principles; analysis of styles of scoring. Prerequisite: MUSC 0560 or permission of instructor.
T,Th 1:00-2:20pm (Staff) Orwig 112

MUSC 1130 Jazz Composing and Arranging
A review of jazz theory topics, including rhythmic structures, scales and modes, harmonic progressions and substitutions, improvisation techniques, forms and development. Weekly writing assignments for two to five parts with rhythm section accompaniment. Students compose and orchestrate three works for small and large jazz ensembles. Guest composers review students' compositions and various Brown jazz bands rehearse and record them. Prerequisites: MUSC 0550.
T,Th 4:00-6:20pm (M. McGarrell) Orwig 109

MUSC 1200 Seminar in Electronic Music: The Recording Studio as Compositional Tool
A study of advanced studio techniques taught in parallel with topics in psychoacoustics. Students will create original studio work while developing listening and technical skills for audio production. Technical topics include recording, signal processing and mixing software, microphone technique, and live sound engineering. Class size is limited. Preference will be given to students who have completed MUSC 0200. Students will be evaluated for potential future work in the MEME program (Multimedia and Electronic Music Experiments) and past participation in MEME. Admission is determined by an entrance questionnaire completed at the first class meeting. Prerequisite: MUSC 0200
T,Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (J. Moses) Steinert 205

MUSC1240B Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Narrative and Immersion
A production course examining the potentials for engagement in new media installations. The course draws on techniques of narrative to establish engagement in immersive environments. Students will be introduced to cinematic concepts, interactive technologies, multi-channel video and surround sound environments. Class meetings will consist of viewing and analysis of exemplary work, discussion of readings, and critiques of student projects. An additional 1-hour technical workshop will be devoted to learning Jitter. Class members should have completed advanced work in film/video, digital sound, and/or creative writing. Open to upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students. The final class list will be determined after the first class meeting, by permission of instructor. S/NC
Wed. 1:00-4:50 p.m. (T. Winkler/L. Thornton) Granoff N430

MUSC 1240G Topics in New Media Theory and Production: Post-vernacular Composition/‘Pop Music’ gone Feral
This seminar explores the fertile creative territory found around the more adventurous edges of ‘popular’ musics. The course will focus on non-notated contemporary composition, but this need not be restricted to the recording studio, or to the production of ‘fixed’ works. The idea of post-vernacular is utilised to challenge the view that vernacular musics are only oriented towards commercialism and mass popularity. It seeks to extend and develop the inherently experimental dimensions of much vernacular musical practice. Students will respond to a number of increasingly open-ended assignments, and will explore cultural and aesthetic considerations via a portfolio of practical and theoretical work. Permission of instructor is required.
Thurs. 4:00-6:20 p.m. (J. Ferguson) Steinert 205

MUSC 1932 American Roots Music
This seminar offers a critical and comparative exploration of American roots music, a category comprising folk, traditional, and popular genres that have been labeled "heritage music" or "ethnic music" in the context of American multiculturalism. Major case studies include African American, Mexican American, and Anglo American traditions/repertoires, with geographical emphases in Appalachia, the city of Chicago, and the state of California. Readings draw on both historical and ethnographic scholarship. Some background coursework in ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, American Studies, and/or ethnic studies is required. Prerequisite: MUSC 1900 or ETHN 0500 or instructor permission.
T,Th 10:30-11:50 a.m. (K. Miller) Orwig 109

MUSC 1950 Jazz Transcription and Analysis
Transcriptions from major jazz recordings are made by the students. The personal styles of the musicians are defined through analysis in the context of the various trends in jazz history. The transcriptions are analyzed within the parameters of rhythmic and harmonic structures, tone quality, motific design, and idiomatic performance. Singing, ear-training, and dictation are used to develop transcription skills. Instructor permission required.
Thurs. 12:00-2:50 p.m. (E. Tomassi) Fulton Rehearsal Hall

MUSC 2000 Theory and Method in Ethnomusicology
This core seminar offers a graduate-level survey of the discipline of ethnomusicology and its history, building on previous coursework in ethnographic methods and the history of anthropological theory. Students will complete independent research projects as well as shorter assignments geared to professional development (e.g., exam field proposal, scholarly book review, historical investigation of the Society for Ethnomusicology). Prerequisites: MUSC 1900 and ANTH 2000 or instructor permission.
Fri. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (K. Miller) Orwig 109

MUSC 2090D Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Sound Studies
Explores sound studies through readings of exemplary texts and discussions of the key debates that enliven this interdisciplinary field of inquiry. Drawing on philosophical, musicological, anthropological, and other kinds of writings, it explores issues like the way that relations between sound, noise, silence, and music have formed in different cultures and different historical periods; ideological structures that determine the place of sound in artistic practice and in everyday life; the power relations that are implicated in the design of local soundscapes; and the place of aural perception within the sensorium, among other potential topics. Enrollment limited to graduate students.
Mon. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (C. Tucker) Orwig 109

MUSC 2220 Design and Playing Alternative Controllers
This seminar will explore the science and aesthetics of designing alternate controllers for musical performance. Topics will include basic electronics and hardware prototyping, instrument construction, theories of gesture, human-computer interface issues, and the challenges of mapping sensor data to meaningful musical parameters. Previous experience with MaxMSP or other real-time programming required. Permission of instructor required.
T,Th 1:00-2:20 a.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff S310
Thurs. (Lab) 2:30-3:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff S310

MUSC 2270A Exploring Technologically Mediated Performance via Attali’s 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music'
This course configures Attali’s notions of ‘representing’, ‘repeating’, and ‘composing’ as theoretical catalysts for the development of contemporary creative practice. The course is structured around seminars, collaborative ensemble work, and individual projects. We negotiate Attali’s text in its entirety and realize appropriate responses in a variety of formats, including: performance, installation/intervention, audio/video documentation. Additional short readings and presentations enrich critical discussion and practical activity. MUSC 2### is intended to follow on from various MEME courses such as 1210, 1240F, 1240G, 2220, 2230, 2280. Enrolment is restricted to fourteen. Permission of instructor is required.
Wed. 3:00-5:20 p.m. (J. Ferguson) Steinert 205

MUSC 2280 Designing Large-Scale Multimedia Projects
A production seminar designed for students working on a single, large project in Multimedia and/or Computer Music. The course covers planning and implementation strategies, with group critiques of proposals and works-in-progress. The class structure includes individual lessons for students working on a graduate or undergraduate thesis project. Permission will be granted based upon a questionnaire given in the first class. Enrollment is limited. Written permission required. May be repeated for credit.
Mon. 2:00-4:50 p.m. (T. Winkler) Steinert 205

Performance Offerings - Spring 2015

MUSC 0221 Electroacoustic Improv Ensemble (Half credit each semester) An ensemble devoted to free improvisation with new media. Experimental approaches to sound and focused listening techniques are explored with acoustic instruments, live electronics, real-time video, together with networked improvisation, and more. By audition. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Wed. 7:00-9:50 p.m. (J. Rovan) Granoff N430

MUSC 0601 Chorus (Half credit each semester)A practical study of choral literature, techniques, and performance practice from Gregorian chant to the present, offered through rehearsals, sectionals, and performance. Reading and listening assignments may be required. Enrollment by audition, based on voice quality, experience, and music-reading ability. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:30-8:20 p.m. (F. Jodry) Steinert 105

MUSC 0611 Orchestra (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the orchestral repertory from Bach to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Tues, Thurs. 7:15-9:45 p.m. (P. Phillips) Alumnae Hall

MUSC 0621 Wind Symphony (Half credit each semester) A practical study of the wind band repertory from Mozart to the present, offered through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Mon, Wed. 6:00-7:20 p.m. (M); 6:00-8:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall

MUSC 0631 Jazz Band (Half credit each semester) A practical study of jazz from the 1920s to the present through coaching, rehearsals, and performances. Seminars on arranging, ear training, and improvisation are conducted for interested students but the focus is on performance. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists and vocalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
MUSC 0631 S01 Mon, Thurs 7:30-8:50 p.m. (M); 6:10-7:20 p.m. (Th) (M. McGarrell) Fulton Rehearsal Hall
MUSC 0631 S02 8:00-9:20 p.m. (T) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0631 S03 2:00-3:20 (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0631 S04 4:00-5:20 p.m. (W) (M. McGarrell) Arr.
MUSC 0631 S05 4:00-5:20 p.m. (F) (M. McGarrell) Arr.

MUSC 0641 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) A dynamic introductory course on drumming, dancing, and singing of Ghana and the diaspora. Students learn to perform diverse types of African music, including Ewe, Akan, Ga, and Dagomba pieces on drums, bells, and shakers. No prerequisites. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment limit 15.
Wed. 5:00-7:20 p.m. (Sec.01) (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC0645 Brazilian Choro Ensemble (Half credit each semester) Students will play this popular Brazilian style, which emerged in the late 19th century and is often compared to early jazz. Classes run according to the traditional roda model, a structured jam session where performers read through, improvise upon, and hone their abilities to play familiar tunes. Prior familiarity with choro music not required, but some instrumental expertise is; ability to read notation preferred. Typical instruments include guitar, cavaquinho (Brazilian ukulele), mandolin, flute, and pandeiro (Brazilian tambourine), but others are welcome to participate on instructor approval, as are performers interested in learning these. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20. Repeatable for credit. S/NC.
Mon. 5:30-7:00 p.m. (J. Tucker) Orwig 301

MUSC 0651 Javanese Gamelan (Half credit each semester) Instruction, rehearsals and performances of the music of Indonesia using the Department's Javanese gamelan ensemble, "Sekar Setaman." The Javanese gamelan is an orchestra consisting of gongs, bronze metallophones, xylophones, drums, a flute, singers, and a bowed string instrument. No prerequisite. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.
Tues. 6:00-8:50 p.m. (I.M. Harjito) Orwig 111

MUSC 0671 Old-Time String Band (Half credit each semester) Southern Appalachian Mountain music on such acoustic instruments as fiddle (violin), banjo, mandolin, and guitar. Music taught by ear. Prerequisite: audition during first class. May be repeated once for credit.
Tues. 7:00-8:50 p.m. (S.Astrausky/R. MacLeod) Orwig 301

MUSC 0681 Chamber Music Performance (Half credit each semester) The practical study of the literature of chamber music through participation in a small ensemble. Regular rehearsals, coaching by department staff, and performances are required. Enrollment by audition. Restricted to skilled instrumentalists. May be repeated for credit. Written permission required.
Arr. (P. Phillips)

MUSC 1961 Ghanaian Drumming (Half credit each semester) Students with experience in African and related musical traditions perform drumming, dancing, and singing of Ghana and the diaspora. Focus on a more challenging repertoire with emphasis on multi-part, lead, and improvisational playing. Prerequisite: audition. May be repeatable for credit. Written permission required.
Wed. 7:30-10:00 p.m. (M. Obeng) Orwig 301

MUSC 0810, 1810 Applied Music Program: Instruction in Vocal or Instrumental Music (Half-Credit each semester) Openings are limited. Enrollment and re-enrollment is by audition and jury. Lessons are given by consultants to the Applied Music Program. A fee is charged for enrollment. Copies of the Applied Music Program Guidelines giving detailed information are available online at www.brown.edu/music. Instructor’s permission required. Repeatable for credit four times on the same instrument. NOTE: MUSC0810 is restricted to skilled musicians. MUSC1810 is restricted to skilled musicians demonstrating mastery of an advanced repertory in their fields. Prerequisite for MUSC1810: MUSC 0400, MUSC 0550, or MUSC 0560.
Arr. (Staff)