special collections @brown university library
                                              arrowhttp://www.brown.edu/Facilities/University_Library/
Brown University Library Logo
line
The Newsboy


Carriers' Addresses:
New Year's Greetings


line

Early American Carriers' Addresses

Carriers' addresses began as simple poems, plain or with a modest border of type ornaments. Gradually the borders became more elaborate and architectural, with classical columns and pediments and later with Gothic pinnacles, all made up of type ornaments in a display of the printers' skill. Sometimes colored inks or colored papers were used as well. Often the borders included vignettes, urns, flowers, grapes, printing presses, or small statue-like figures. Eagles and American flags were always popular.

News-boy to his Customers dot The news-boy to his Customers. Pro bono publico.
Telegraphe Office, January 2, 1797.
[Baltimore, Md.: Clayland, Dobbin & Co.], 1797.
The Baltimore Telegraphe's main poem uses "Public Good" as a catchphrase and ends "Pro Bono Publico forever"; the closing verses deprecate the poem and say the lines are partly stolen and partly made by the newsboy.
Harris Broadsides Collection

dot
The carrier of the Independent Ledger, &c. wishes his kind customers a Merry Christmas & happy New-Year, and presents the following: ...
Boston:[Printed by Draper and Folson],1785.
The poem, from the Independent Ledger and American Advertiser, exalts Washington and Franklin and wishes peace and plenty, virtue and industry, freedom and religion for the carrier's customers.
Harris Broadsides Collection

dot
The news boy's address to the patrons of the Farmers' Register.
Lansingburgh, [N.Y.]: Farmer's Register, 1804.
The poem praises President Jefferson and attacks "dark Faction" and"Taxation's haggard form," referring to former president John Adams's policies.
Harris Broadsides Collection
dot
Dedication. To the ever liberal and right worthy patrons of the Columbian Centinel, this eleventh anniversary ode, is most humbly dedicated, by their obedient devoted servant, the Carrier.
Boston: [B. Russell], 1795.
The letters USA in a sunburst ornament the name of the newspaper. The poem, reflecting resentment in the United States against France, attacks both "royal butchers" and French "Robesperians" with their bloody guillotine.
Harris Broadsides Collection
dot
The carriers, of the Independent Chronicle, to their patrons and friends!
Boston: [Powars & Willis], 1798.
The carriers request money for "hat, coat, and shoes," and promise heartfelt prayers and blessings.The Indian on the Massachusetts seal holds a bow and arrow, but he is overshadowed by an arm wielding a European sword.
Harris Broadsides Collection
dot
The news carrier's address to the patrons of the American Citizen.
New York: [D. Denniston & J. Cheetham], 1802.
A note proclaims, "John Hartman has carried this paper (under its different titles) for upwards of six years--a good and faithful servant of the public." The poem praises Jefferson for his support of the Rights of Man.
Harris Broadsides Collection
dot
The Gazette carrier's New-Year address, to his patrons.
[Providence, R.I.: H.H. Brown], 1812.
The newsboy promises to avoid politics in his poem and begs the ladies for their "instinctive pity" and charity, promising repayment in "climes beyond the solar round."
Harris Broadsides Collection

dot
New-Year's address of the carrier of the Mercantile Advertiser,for January 1st, 1810.
[New York: J. Crooke & A. Butler], 1810.
The poem begins with classical references the carrier claims to have learned at school--Phoebus, Janus and the animals of the zodiac, and then proceeds to foreign and domestic events, England's war with France and the damage to American commerce from both "British sea-dogs"and "Gallic harpies."
Harris Broadsides Collection
dot
The carriers of the Independent Chronicle, to their liberal patrons.
[Boston: Powars & Willis], 1811.
In a reference to Latin American affairs, the poem invokes the spirit of Columbus to behold the "Tree of Freedom" in his western world, and watch it spread to "Peruvia's golden vales."
Harris Broadsides Collection

dot
The news-boy's address, to the patrons of the Chelsea Courier.

Norwich, [Conn.: Thomas Hubbard], 1798.
Eight cantos address different groups of readers, the clergy (Gentlemen of the Desk), physicians (Gentlemen of the Faculty), lawyers (Gentlemen of the Bar), bankers (Opulent Proprietors of Norwich Bank), and others, ending with the merchants,, mechanics and farmers.
Harris Broadsides Collection

dot
New-Year's address of the carrier of the American to his patrons.

Providence: The American, 1809.
A classical poem describes the damage to United States commerce from England's war with France and Jefferson's Embargo Actin terms of a quarrel between Neptune and Jove.
Harris Broadsides Collection

line

arrowCarriers Addresses | arrowMonthly Focus |arrowSpecial Collections Home


Last Updated: Wednesday, 15-Mar-2006 14:57:49 EST.
© 2001, Brown University Library. All rights reserved.
Contact us: hay@brown.edu

There have been 2,004 accesses since January 1, 21001