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The Newsboy


Carriers' Addresses:
New Year's Greetings


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Later Nineteenth Century Carriers Addresses

On some carriers' addresses the illustrations are striking, more important than the poetry. This occurs especially towards the end of the nineteenth century.

Philadelphia Daily Newsdot
Carriers' address to their patrons, 1860. Philadelphia Daily News.
Philadelphia, 1860.
The illustrations show the "Plan of the proposed alterations of the County Building," inscribed "E. Rogers sc. Phila." and the "Proposed monument to the thirteen states." The poem, signed P.S.W., mentions John Brown's"attempt on southern slavery" at Harper's Ferry, but predicts a peaceful new year.
Harris Broadsides Collection

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Carriers' centennial New Year's address. January 1, 1876.
[Philadelphia?], 1876.
The poem mentions national and foreign events as usual, but the border illustrations refer to the great United States centennial celebration. Shown are the Centennial Memorial Building in Philadelphia and portraits of all presidents from Washington to Grant.The scrolls held by the eagle are inscribed "July 4th , 1776" and "Jan. 1, 1876."
Harris Broadsides Collection






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New-Year's address by the carrier. 1878.
[New York]: Graphic Co., 1878.
The illustrations are from the New York Daily Graphic; the one at top center is signed Chas. J. Taylor. The poem, not at all humorous, discusses the seasons of the year as they apply to human life.
Harris Broadsides Collection

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Indianapolis News. Ballade of the carrier.
Indianapolis: [J.H. Holliday], 1886.
The lithograph on the first page has the signature, "Darrow Bros. Designers and Engravers." The poem inside refers to the "sturdy" and "happy" carrier.
Harris Broadsides Collection

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The Indianapolis Sentinel. Carriers New-Years address 1887.

Indianapolis: Sentinel Co., 1887.
The poem in the center, by J. Anketell, is about "Santa Klaus," who is compared to the carrier who brings news to adults. In the lower left corner is the inscription, "The American Graphic Co., N.Y."
Harris Broadsides Collection

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Carriers New Years address. 1891.
Salem, [Mass.: Newcomb & Gauss], 1891.
The lithograph is inscribed, "Lith. of A. Ward Phelps,53-55-57 Park Place, New York." The poem is the "Carriers greeting of the Salem Observer."
Harris Broadsides Collection

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Carriers' address. Jan. 1st, 1863. Thompson's Bank Note & Commercial Reporter. We wish you a Happy New Year.
New York: American Banker, 1863.
"Des'nd and Lith. by John H. Russell. 115 Franklin St. New-York." The poem describes a vision of twelve old men, the months of 1862, who put down their heavy loads and read aloud from their books. It ends with a hope for peace in 1863.
Harris Broadsides Collection

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The Washington Critic. Washington, D.C. Carriers' annual greeting. January 1, 1887.

Washington, D.C.: [Evening Critic Pub. Co.], 1887.
Caricatures of politicians surround a poem supposedly by Wabash Q. Waxem, Member of Congress from Wayback. It is addressed to the boys who sell the Critic, saying, "You all air littell Libbertys Inlightnin' uv the world."
Harris Broadsides Collection


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