Dov Sax

Dov Sax
Associate Professor
Office: (401) 863-9676

CV         Publication PDFs

Dov's work examines species’ responses to climate change, the impacts of species invasions, the timing of species extinctions, and the mertis of alternative conservation strategies.




Sarah Ivory
Voss Postdoctoral Fellow

Sarah's work in the Sax Lab examines how paleoecological and modern data can be used in complimentary ways to understand the factors that limit species distributions and how species will respond to future changes in climate.


Emily Hollenbeck
PhD Student

Emily's work uses epiphyte species distributed along elevational gradients as a model, experimetnal system to advance our basic understanding of species' responses to climate change, but also to inform tropical, montane conservation efforts.


Donny Perret
PhD Student

Donny is interested broadly in global change ecology. He has a special interest in understanding how species geographic distributions will shift in response to changes in climate.




Sam vanDeurs
Research Technician

Sam is interested broadly in ecology and global change. She is a key leader in the labs's efforts to explore the factors that limit the geographic distributions of plants, using naturalized and horticultural distributions as a novel source of insight on the importance of climate in setting range boundaries.



Yesenia Valverde
Undergraduate Researcher

Yesenia is interested broadly in tropical forest biology and conservation. After studying epiphytes in Monteverde, she invested time in learning mist netting techniques for birds and bats. She is now conducting a senior thesis exploring change in avian communities in response to climate change using data she collected mist netting birds in Costa Rica.



Bailey McLaughlin
Undergraduate Researcher

Bailey is interested in the conservation challenges associated with global change. Her senior thesis investigates the evidence that tree species in North America that were once dispersed by megafauna (such as now extinct mastodons, giant ground sloths and camels) have native range extents that underrepresent the climatic conditions in which these species can thrive.


Kenji Hayashi
Undergraduate Researcher

Kenji is broadly interested in biogeographical patterns with a particular interest in latidudinal gradients. His current research in the lab explores how ecosystem function (such as plant productivity rates) are influenced by the intersection of two factors: climate conditions and the fraction of a species assemblage dominated by non-native species.



Lab Alumni

Postdoctoral Associates

Dr. Kathryn Amatangelo
Assistant Professor,
State Univesity of New York, Brockport

Dr. Regan Early
University of Exeter

Dr. Heinke Jaeger
Research Scientist,
Charles Darwin Foundation

Dr. Jacquelyn Gill
Assistant Professor,
University of Maine

Dr. John Zinda
Assistant Professor,
Cornell University


PhD Student

Matt Heard
Assistant Professor,
Winthrop University


Undergraduate Thesis Students

Ada Bersoza Hernandez
Master's student, University of Florida

Erin Capra
Master's student, Brown University

Phoebe Hopkins
Natural History and Travel

Maddie Johnston
Sustainable Farming and Education

Emily Longman
Research Technician, Northeastern University

Birch Malotky
Natural History and Travel

Madison Miketa
PhD student, Georgetown University

Kyle Rosenblad
Tutor & Musician (& current Sax Lab collaborator)

Liz Ryan
PhD student, Univ. of California, San Diego

Emma Suchland
Research Technician, Univ. of Washington

Ariana Spawn
Sea Grant Knauss Marine Policy Fellow

Megan Whelan
Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy



Sax Research Lab, Brown University, Box G-W Providence, Rhode Island 02912; (401) 863-9676;