Courses for Fall 2015

  • So You Want to Change the World?

    Examines from an anthropological perspective efforts to address global poverty that are typically labeled as "development." The enterprise of development is considered critically, both with regard to the intentions and purposes that underlie the actions of wealthy countries, donor organizations, and expatriate development workers and with regard to the outcomes for the people who are the intended beneficiaries. Privileging the prespectives of ordinary people in developing countries, but also looking carefully at the institutions involved in development, the course relies heavily on ethnographic case studies that will draw students into the complexity of one of the greatest contemporary global problems: social inequality. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0066J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Flores
  • What Does It Mean To Be Green?

    What does it mean to be green? From saving energy to recycling to eating organic food, in recent years the idea of going green has gained increasing attention. But green is not solely a proxy for environmentalism: it encompasses competing, and at times contradictory meanings. This seminar places contemporary green debates in historical and cross-cultural contexts. We will examine multiple paradigms of greenness in the Global South as well as the Global North. Topics range from imperial visions of tropical landscapes to the green revolution emphasis on agrochemicals, from conservation to climate change. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. DPLL FYS
    ANTH 0066W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Graef
  • Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance

    This course offers students an opportunity to examine and analyze a range of contemporary global social problems from an anthropological perspective. We will explore human-environment entanglements with particular attention to intersecting issues of capitalism, international development, and state and non-state governance. Course materials will look at various kinds of work in, on, and with the environment, asking questions about the possibilities of over-working our landscapes, while addressing the potentials for social and environment justice and sustainability. LILE
    ANTH 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Human Evolution

    Examination of theory and evidence on human evolution in the past, present and future. Topics include evolution and adaptation, biocultural adaptation, fossil evidence, behavioral evolution in primates, human genetic variation and contemporary human biological variation. WRIT
    ANTH 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Inequality, Sustainability, and Mobility in a Car-Clogged World

    The global car population is predicted to reach two billion by the year 2020. The social, political, health, and environmental consequences are immense. These, as well as the cultural and political economic explanations for the car population explosion, will be explored in this class, as will alternative futures for transit.
    ANTH 0450 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
  • Of Beauty and Violence

    What is the place of beauty in human experience and how does it find articulation in words? Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the unexpected expressions and uses of beauty in a variety of social and ethnographic contexts marked by violence. We trace the potential of beauty to act at times as a counterweight to violence, sociopolitical crises, and marginalization, but also how it may be used to deepen already existing power structures. This is a writing-intensive course aimed at developing students’ ethnographic writing skills. No prerequisites. DPLL
    ANTH 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stainova
  • Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    This introduction to the study of language and culture considers how language not only reflects social reality but also creates it. We'll examine specific cases of broad current relevance, in the process learning how an analytical anthropological approach to language use lays bare its often hidden power. We'll consider how language creates and reinforces social inequality and difference, how language promotes and resists globalization, and how language is used creatively in performance, literature, film, advertising, and mass media. We will also consider how language does important social work in specific contexts, such as classrooms, courtrooms, medical settings, and political campaigns. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Anthropology of China

    This course introduces students to contemporary Chinese culture and society, w/a focus on the rapid changes that have taken place during the post-Mao reform era in the People’s Republic of China (1978- present). Emphasis will be placed on the importance of historical and global context in developing an understanding of contemporary Chinese culture. Readings and lectures will draw primarily upon recent ethnographic work conducted in the PRC, but readings from the disciplines of history, political science, public health, and contemporary Chinese literature (in translation) will also be incorporated. Topics: family life, urbanization, housing, migration, gender, health/disease, labor, globalization, and cyberculture. LILE
    ANTH 1111 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • An Introduction to GIS and Spatial Analysis for Anthropologists and Archaeologists

    This course serves as an introduction to the concepts, techniques, and (to a lesser extent, the histories) that motivate geographic information systems and their employment in anthropological and archaeological scholarship. GIS brings together traditional cartographic principles, computer-assisted analytical cartography, relational database design, and digital image processing and analysis to enable people to develop geospatial databases, analyze those databases, and use maps and other visual representations as part of this analysis. No previous work in GIS or computer programming is necessary. Previous computer experience with MS Windows operating systems is helpful. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1201 S01
    Primary Instructor
    van Valkenburgh
  • Anthropology of Masculinity

    Contemporary anthropological and historical study of masculine identities and practices throughout the world, focusing on topics such as the cultural economies of masculinity, cultural regions and images of manhood, male friendship, machismo, embodied masculinity, violence, power, and sexual fault lines.
    Prerequisite: Prior course in Social Science or instructor's permission required. LILE
    ANTH 1221 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law

    Designed to give students an opportunity to engage in transnational research on social issues through an extended case study of a new generation of international norms that identify and combat "human trafficking." The course format combines seminar discussions, lectures, and small group exercises. Students will learn by doing. As we consider legal instruments, UN and U.S. documentary archives, anti-trafficking media such as films and websites, and the prosecution of criminal networks, we will experiment with alternative methodologies for analyzing them. We will study the relation of texts to the social and political contexts of their production and circulation. Enrollment limited to 30. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1224 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Urban Life: Anthropology in and of the City

    This course examines how anthropologists have worked in the city -- to understand dwelling and lived experience from the center to the margins of society; as well as how anthropologists have contributed to the study of the city -- conceptualizing the city itself in relation to its inhabitants, and working to understand how cities develop, decline, or are sustained. Anchored in key theory, classic texts, and contemporary ethnography, the course traces also the history, present, and possible futures of the discipline. Students learn the methods of urban ethnography, and gain hands-on experience through local field exercises and related writing assignments.
    ANTH 1236 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • Anthropology of Addictions and Recovery

    The purpose of this course is to consider the uses and misuses alcohol, tobacco and drugs, and approaches to recovery from addictions. We will read some of the major cross cultural, ethnographic, linguistic, and social-political works on addictions. Students will have the opportunity to conduct their own anthropological interviews regarding substance misuse and recovery as well as observe a local 12 step recovery meeting. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • International Health: Anthropological Perspectives

    This upper-level medical anthropology course focuses on the social and cultural complexity of health problems in developing nations, employing anthropological approaches to public health. International health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, reproductive health, violence, and mental illness will be examined. The historical, political and socio-cultural dimensions of international health problems will be explored through reading ethnographic case studies. WRIT DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Ancient Maya Writing

    Nature and content of Mayan hieroglyphic writing, from 100 to 1600 CE. Methods of decipherment, introduction to textual study, and application to interpretations of Mayan language, imagery, world view, and society. Literacy and Mesoamerican background of script. LILE
    ANTH 1650 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives. LILE
    ANTH 1720 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Anthropological Approaches to World Issues: Locating Migration

    Migration is a main way that not only populations change, but also economies, landscapes, cultures, and identities. Drawing on cases from across the globe and through time, we will examine migration through both the global flows of capital and culture and through migrants’ lives as they build families, fight for belonging, and transform the built environment. This capstone seminar is designed to further concentrators’ engagement with anthropology, its methods, subfields, and its contributions to our knowledge of human experience. Particular emphasis will be on how anthropology aids in understanding the interrelation of global political and economic systems and local experiences. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1910H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Flores
  • Ethnographic Research Methods

    To understand the different theoretical assumptions that shape research efforts; to examine how hypotheses and research questions are formulated; and to appreciate the ethical and scientific dimensions of research by hands-on experience in fieldwork projects. Prerequisite: One Anthropology course.
    ANTH 1940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Moran-Thomas
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History of Ethnological Theory

    A seminar investigating some themes in the history of anthropological theory. Starting with the delineations of the scope and nature of social science by Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, the seminar then considers various explorations of the concepts of structure, function, and agency, concluding with Bourdieu's reformulation of social anthropology for a new generation in the form of practice theory.
    ANTH 2000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
  • Ethnography and Literature: Representations of "Woman, Native, Other"

    This interdisciplinary graduate seminar addresses the cultural construction of subaltern groups under the signs of "woman", "native" and "other". As part of critical endeavor, the seminar will raise questions about "truth" genres, the interpretive anthropological project of "writing culture" and the production of a hegemonic discourses on "woman, native, other". Using texts and counter discourses of the subalterns, we will discuss and problematize issues of empowerment and authority as they relate to self-representations by the dis-empowered, the production of cultural fictions-auto ethnographies by such groups as political acts of self-empowerment, and to explore the possibilities for ethnographies of "fiction".
    ANTH 2005 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
    ANTH 2060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Gender, Liberalism, and Postcolonial Theory

    What makes the concept of gender useful to think with, both within academia and beyond? How does gender relate to the political projects of feminism and liberalism? What explanatory potential do gender and liberalism hold for addressing (or obfuscating) social inequalities, racism, and other forms of oppression? Drawing on multiple disciplines in the social sciences, this course offers students analytical tools to theorize gender, sexuality, and liberalism in the contemporary world. Building on critical interventions of post-colonial theorists, we will explore anthropological contributions to the study of gender, sexuality and liberalism through ethnographic writings. Open to graduate students and seniors.
    ANTH 2255 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Daulatzai
  • Violence, Governance, and Transnationalism

    This seminar deals with contemporary anthropological approaches to violence, governance, and transnationalism. As faculty and graduate students, we have worked together to identify important ethnographic experiments that provide novel anthropological framings of major global issues. Our goal is to interrogate anthropological writing, explore its relation to field research, and trace anthropological appropriations of contemporary social theory from a variety of sources. Prerequisites: three previous courses in Anthropology.
    ANTH 2310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Principles of Archaeology

    Examines theoretical and methodological issues in anthropological archaeology. Attention is given to past concerns, current debates, and future directions of archaeology in the social sciences.
    ANTH 2501 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Mesoamerican Archaeology and Ethnohistory

    Seminar focusing on current issues in the archaeology and history of Mesoamerica, including Mexico and Northern Central America. Draws on rich resources at Brown, including the John Carter Brown Library.
    ANTH 2520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Historical Archaeology: From Colony to City

    Examines historical archaeology as a complex field of inquiry that engages multiple sources of evidence and incorporates a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches. The seminar will consider the range of evidence available to historical archaeologists, and draw on examples from colonies and cities around the world to explore how the richness and diversity of the evidence is used.
    ANTH 2540 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep