Courses for Spring 2015

  • Who Owns the Past?

    Examines the role of the past in the present. Using examples from the U.S. and other parts of the world, we will look at how archaeological evidence is implicated in contemporary cultural and political issues. Students will learn that the past is not just the focus of archaeologists’ interest and scientific inquiries, but is also a subject romanticized by antiquarians, mobilized in nation-building, marketed for profit, re-enacted as entertainment, consumed by tourists, and glorified in commemoration. Understanding these different and competing valuations, claims, and uses of the archaeological past will provide an introduction to why the past matters in the present and to the future. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS DPLL
    ANTH 0066D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • The Anthropology of Children and Childhood

    This first year seminar explores childhood and children from an anthropological perspective. First, we will examine the concept of childhood both historically and cross-culturally. Second, we look at the development pathways that cultural communities provide for the children. These pathways are shaped by cultural ecology and history and by the goals of parents, communities and children themselves. Finally, we will review anthropological conceptions of children as social actors who shape their cultures and lives. FYS
    ANTH 0066V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites. WRIT DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Myths Alive

    Myth is an important part of the architecture that sustains human culture and society. This course begins w/an account of the principal theoretical positions that've shaped anthropological understandings of myth as a living and guiding force in human communities in ancient times and in the present day. We'll examine the expressions of myth in senses of place, social harmony, inequality, conflict, religious experience, and radical social change in a wide variety of historical and ethnographic settings including Native America, West Africa, and colonial dislocations. We'll draw upon objects from Brown's Haffenreffer Museum to recognize them as materialized representations from mythical worlds. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
  • Gold: The Culture of a “Barbarous Relic”

    An object of obsession for millennia, gold has recently witnessed a polarizing cultural politics. In congressional testimony former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke labeled it a “barbarous relic.” Meanwhile a growing minority clamor for a return to the gold standard. Whether among medieval alchemists or modern financial wizards, whether in the eyes of Egyptian Pharaohs or Indian peasants, gold’s special qualities have shaped cultural practice. This course explores the shiny yellow metal’s cultural history, from its emergence as an object of desire, to the contemporary rejection of its role as the store of wealth resulting in its demotion to just another commodity. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0250 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Straughn
  • Past Forward: Discovering Anthropological Archaeology

    This course offers a broad journey through the human past, from material culture crafted by our evolutionary ancestors to the remnants of the recent historic past. To facilitate this journey, the class explores the methods, concepts, and theories that anthropologists employ in the study of past peoples, places, and things. Case studies stretch across the globe. As a hands-on endeavor, archaeology focuses on tangible evidence. In this course, small-group discussion, laboratory, and field exercises will complement lectures, leading to an understanding of how anthropologists study the past and how that knowledge affects the present. LILE
    ANTH 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Introduction to South American Archaeology

    The course examines the development of human cultures in South America, from the first Ice Age settlers to the arrival of the Spanish. Drawing on archaeological and historical evidence, it covers the complex civilizations of the Andex, including the Moche and Tiwanaku polities and the expansionist Inca empire. It also explores the archaeology of foraging societies throughout the continent and of sedentary societies in the Amazon region and northern South America whose complexity has only recently begun to be understood. The course concludes with a study of the Spanish Conquest and the transformation of indigenous societies during the Colonial period. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0505 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • AIDS in Global Perspective

    Communities around the world are affected in different ways by the HIV-AIDS pandemic. This course is concerned with cross-cultural variation in knowledge, perception, and treatment of AIDS in a global context. Twenty-five years into the global epidemic, how does social and cultural variation influence the continued spread or management of the disease? In addition to reading significant anthropological works related to the meaning of AIDS in cultural context, the course will address major public health initiatives related to the global AIDS pandemic, and offer an anthropological critique of their design, implementation and success. Enrollment limited to 40. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
  • Anthropology of Masculinity

    Contemporary anthropological and historical study of masculine identities and practices throughout the world, focusing on topics such as the cultural economies of masculinity, cultural regions and images of manhood, male friendship, machismo, embodied masculinity, violence, power, and sexual fault lines.
    Prerequisite: Prior course in Social Science or instructor's permission required. LILE
    ANTH 1221 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Gender, Nature, the Body

    This course is an interrogation of the ways in which gender difference comes to be conceived of as “natural” in modern science and different cultural contexts. What is the connection between the science of gender difference and the colonial encounter? What are some different ways of imagining gender difference? How are gender inequalities structured and perpetuated by science and political economy? Through careful reading of historical and anthropological texts, we will learn about various ways in which gender systems are constructed and resisted, how science is used to construct gender, and how gender politics influence scientific outcomes and practices. DPLL SOPH WRIT
    ANTH 1223 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • Religion and Culture

    Global events in recent years seem to defy the commonsensical idea that religious traditions would decline or disappear in the modern epoch. We examine classic theories and methods in the study of religion to understand the continuing vitality of spiritual contemplation, asceticism, myths, rituals, magic, witchcraft, experiences of healing, and other ways of thinking and acting that are typically associated with (or against) the concept of religion. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1240 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Bioethics and Culture

    This course is an introduction to the work of medical anthropologists who have engaged with social and ethical implications of medical practice and biotechnologies. In this class we look at bioethical problems as ways to understand larger social questions and look at the ways in which society as a whole influences bioethical questions and decisions. Particular emphasis will be on questions about the beginnings and ends of life, genetic testing, pharmaceuticals, psychiatry, health inequalities, and organ transplantation. Prerequisites for the course are: a previous course in medical anthropology (e.g. Culture and Health) or a previous course in science studies. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1242 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • The Visual in Anthropology: Documentary Films and Society

    This lecture course entails an introduction of the history of anthropology complemented with cinematic documentary films. Anthropological text is used to demonstrate continuity between the visual and the written word in select films screened for the course. Weekly topics address the anthropology of exclusive authors to critically juxtapose their work with discussion on either the convergence or discontinuity in the uses of the documentary films. Do films inform us or deviate from our understanding of the written anthropological ethnographies? How do we read culture from the visual? Is culture or the social readable or not? DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1253 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Anthropology of Disasters

    This course examines disasters from an anthropological perspective. We focus on how disasters have been defined and understood, and work more broadly to see what they tell us about human conditions, vulnerabilities, and capacities for resilience building, survival, and long-term sustainability. Drawing on and comparing case studies from around the world, we also examine the nature of destructive agents; degrees of impact and injury; rescue, relief, and humanitarian responses; and the often slow and uneven process of recovery and resilience building.
    ANTH 1255 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • Anthropology of Homelessness

    Homelessness emerged as a public concern in the United States and in other industrialized countries in the late 1970s as people began encountering people living on the streets, a way of life which had formerly been confined to the skid rows of large cities. In this course, through readings, readings, discussion, and hands on experiences with homeless populations, we will uncover the causes, conditions, and responses to homelessness. Each student will spend at least two hours per week in a local homeless-serving agency in order to gain face to face experiences. The field placements will be facilitated by the professor. LILE
    ANTH 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Medical Humanities: Critical Perspectives on Illness, Healing, and Culture

    Medicine is arguably the most humanistic of the hard sciences, one that strives to ensure the basic dignity of individuals. In our increasingly globalized world, access to medical care is recognized as a fundamental human right. However, there continues to be considerable debate over the "best" ways to provide medical services to economically and culturally diverse communities across the globe, given the complex ways that people prioritize and perpetuate their health. This seminar explores the multifaceted relationships between biomedicine and cultural understandings of illness, both in the US and worldwide. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limit 25 juniors and seniors. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1305 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nye
  • Anthropology and International Development: Ethnographic Perspectives on Poverty and Progress

    Examines international development from an ethnographic perspective, looking critically at issues of poverty and progress from local points of view. Course is organized around the premise that culture is central to understanding processes of development. Broad development themes such as public health, agriculture, democracy, and the environment will be explored through readings representing a wide range of regions and cultures. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
  • Race, Culture, and Ethnic Politics

    A seminar addressing the subjects of race, culture, and ethnicity, focusing on minority groups in the U.S. Seeks to clarify the philosophical and theoretical issues in contemporary America using a cross-disciplinary approach. DPLL
    ANTH 1400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Illustrating and Interpreting the Past: Visual Representation in Archaeology

    Archaeologists investigate culture using material artifacts as evidence about the past, but in order to communicate and compare that evidence, they must turn to technologies of reproduction and representation. This course traces the evolution of archaeological illustration, and its contributions to our knowledge of the past, in the context of technological and intellectual change over time. It explores the most up-to-date methods of archaeological illustration and their current place and future directions in the digital humanities. Working with objects from the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, students will acquire experience in traditional and cutting-edge illustration techniques. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1470 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • Techno-Ecologies: Health, Environment and Culture in the Digital Age

    This course examines how people's health and lived experiences are impacted today by global environments in flux—and how these interconnected ecologies are deeply shaped and scrutinized in turn through various networks of technoscience. Topics will include food and nutrition in post-industrial economies; “conservation medicine” and the health of animals; energy and art; the global health implications of climate change; representations of race and indigeneity amid the “politics of nature”; society and microbiome; oil leaks and water wars; chemical exposures and disease; hybridity and nano-technology; and debates surrounding corporate social responsibility in practice. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1551 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Moran-Thomas
  • Environmental Anthropology

    Environmental anthropology is the study of how people interact with environments, past and present. This course explores how humans have affected their environments over time and how environment shapes human culture, employing an interdisciplinary anthropological perspective to illuminate these reciprocal interactions. This course uses a variety of approaches to understand how people interact with environments, employing cultural, biological, linguistic, and archaeological methods. This course covers human adaptation to environmental change from earliest prehistory up to the present day, students will have the opportunity to explore the practical and interpretive dilemmas of environmental challenges of the 21st century and beyond.
    ANTH 1555 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Macleod
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives. LILE
    ANTH 1720 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Anthropology in/of the Museum

    This course provides an introduction to museums from an anthropological perspective. Topics include politics of representation and the construction of the “Other”; objects, identity, and meaning; collecting and cultural property; and collaboration, community engagement, and indigenous self-representation. Assignments involve work with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology’s exhibitions and collections. The course focuses on museums dedicated to natural and cultural history, but establishes theoretical and practical grounding for thinking about and working in other disciplines and other kinds of display institutions. It is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. There are no prerequisites; but familiarity with anthropology is presumed.
    ANTH 1901 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Delair
  • Anthropological Approaches to World Issues

    Capstone seminar for Anthropology concentrators that explores how anthropology can challenge conventional or dominant wisdom about global social problems. Original research project required.
    ANTH 1910A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    A seminar exploring fundamental theoretical and ethnographic currents in 20th-century cultural anthropology.
    ANTH 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Methods of Anthropological Research

    A seminar on the methodological problems associated with field research in social and cultural anthropology. Designed to help students prepare for both summer and dissertation research.
    ANTH 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
  • Advanced Social Theory

    This seminar is for graduate students who have taken ANTH 2000 and ANTH 2010 or equivalent graduate introductory courses in anthropological theory. Topics to be explored in this seminar include contemporary theories of globalization, hybridity, the politics of identity, class, cultural citizenship, democracy, social suffering, structural violence, agency, human rights, militarization, the body, multisited ethnography, and writing culture.
    ANTH 2040 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Problems in Archaeology: Archaeology of Colonialism

    Explores the theoretical discourses shaping anthropological approaches and defining archaeological projects on culture contact and colonialism. Attention will be given to examining colonial encounters between Europeans and indigenous peoples as ongoing processes rather than particular historical moments, and to looking at recent efforts at decolonizing archaeological practice.
    ANTH 2500A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Principles of Archaeology

    Examines theoretical and methodological issues in anthropological archaeology. Attention is given to past concerns, current debates, and future directions of archaeology in the social sciences.
    ANTH 2501 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Lived Bodies, Dead Bodies: The Archaeology of Human Remains

    Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. We will survey the "state of the art" in bioarchaeology, while exploring its relevance and application to the archaeology of complex societies. We will survey a range of bioarchaeological methods and applications, including paleopathology, stable isotope analysis, population affinity/ancient DNA, perimortem trauma, and body modification. In turn, we will explore how bioarchaeology can be used to approach a wide range of archaeological problems relative to complext societies, including subsistence, economy, migration, urbanism, social inequality, conflict and warfare, and identity. Open to graduate students only. S/NC. LILE
    ANTH 2560 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Humanities
    HMAN 2970N The Humanist Social Sciences and Positivist Humanities
    Sociology
    SOC 1871L Entrepreneurs, Innovators and Other Disruptors: The Case of Modern Turkey
    ANTH XLIST 0