Sheltered English Instruction

Sheltered English Instruction

Since the early 1980's content-area teachers have looked to sheltered English instruction as a way to make content comprehensible for the English language learners (ELLs) in their classrooms. In the days when the term was first used in connection with ELLs, students were considered "sheltered" because they studied in classes separate from "the mainstream" and did not compete academically with native English speaking students (Freeman & Freeman, 1988). Today, the majority of ELLs study alongside their English-speaking peers, are held accountable to the same curriculum standards, and take the same high-stakes tests. Sheltered English instruction has come to mean a set of practices valuable to all teachers in helping ELLs learn English and, at the same time, learn content material in English. Questions frequently raised about sheltered English instruction are answered below.

  1. What is sheltered English instruction?
  2. Where is sheltered instruction used and by whom?
  3. Who is qualified to teach sheltered English instruction?
  4. Is sheltered English instruction effective?
  5. How does sheltered English instruction intersect with school initiatives, curricular programs, and professional development plans?
  6. What are the components of sheltered English instruction?

 

Reference

Freeman, D., & Freeman, Y. (1988). Sheltered English instruction.