Course Catalog

Catalog Entries

ASSYRIOLOGY

ASYR 0200 - Introduction to Akkadian
This course is an intensive introduction to the writing system, grammar and vocabulary of Akkadian, the language of ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). Akkadian is the earliest known Semitic language (related to Arabic and Hebrew), first written over four thousand years ago, and the language of some of the oldest written myths, historical documents, omens, magical formulas and even love poems in the world. Students will learn the classic Old Babylonian dialect (ca. 1800 BCE), and read selections from texts in the original language. No prerequisites.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Extra Credit Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 0210 - Intermediate Akkadian
This course is the second semester of an intensive, yearlong introduction to the Akkadian (Babylonian/Assyrian) language. Students will deepen their knowledge of the cuneiform writing system and continue to develop their grasp of Akkadian grammar. Readings from Mesopotamian texts in the original language will include, among others, selections from the Laws of Hammurapi, Assyrian historical texts (such as the accounts of Sennacherib's siege of Jerusalem), and the story of the Flood from the Standard Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh. Prerequisite: Introduction to Akkadian (AWAS 0200) or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Extra Credit Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 0300 - Babylon: Myth and Reality
From the Hanging Gardens of Babylon to the Tower of Babel to Babylon 5, the city of Babylon in ancient Iraq holds an important place in contemporary culture. But how much of what is commonly known of Babylon is true? In this course we will explore the ancient city of Babylon through its texts and archaeological remains and investigate the ways Babylon has been viewed over the past two thousand years. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
First Year Seminar, Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 0350 -  Haunted Universe:
Monsters and Demons at the Dawn of Civilization
This seminar explores the relationship between monsters and civilization, considering what exactly it is that monsters do for us; why we create, deploy, and ultimately destroy them; and what they tell us about the peoples among whom they sprang up and roamed. Emphasized is the developing civilization in Mesopotamia, and the place and functioning of monsters and demons in the visual arts and literary contexts, as well as in the worldview, of the early cities of that region. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
First Year Seminar

ASYR 0800 - Introduction to the Ancient Near East
This course offers an introduction to the study of the political, social and cultural history of the ancient Near East, from prehistory to the end of the Iron age (ca. 330 BC). Both literary sources and archaeological evidence are examined as relevant. Near East is understood here in its widest geographic extent, including primarily the Mesopotamian lowlands, Iranian and Syro-Anatolian highlands, as well as the Levantine coast. The course not only offers a foundational survey of the historical developments in the region, but also addresses the broader methodological and historiographic problems involved in Near Eastern studies. State formation and the development of complex societies, cult practices and cuneiform literary traditions, art, architecture and material culture, issues of landscape and settlement systems, agricultural production, regional and interregional trade, and craft production will constitute the central issues in the course. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Extra Credit Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1100 - Imagining the Gods:
Myths and Myth-making in Ancient Mesopotamia
Creation, the Flood, the Tower of Babel--well-known myths such as these have their origins in ancient Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. Using both ancient texts in translatioin and archaeology, this course will explore categories of Mesopotamian culture labeled "myth" and "religion" (roughly 3300-300 BCE), critically examining the ancient evidence as well as various modern interpretations. Topics will include myths of creation and the flood, prophecy and divination, death and the afterlife, ritual, kingship, combat myths and apocalypses, the nature and expression of ancient religious experience, and representations of the divine. There are no prerequisites. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1150 - The Art of Civilization:
Artist, Image, and Aesthetic in the First Cities
This course examines various facets of the relationship between art and developing social/political complexity in the ancient world, with case studies drawn primarily from the ancient Near East and Egypt between the rise of he first cities in the late fourth millennium BCE through to the fall of Achaemenid "world empire" in the mid-fourth century BCE. 
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 1200 - Sacred Spaces and Sacred Times:
Religious Travels and Pilgrimages in the Ancient Near East
The course will focus on the cultural and religious-historical interpretation of physical displacements among sacred places, including urban processions, visits to temples and journeys to sacred places within the context of the Ancient Near Eastern religions. We will attempt to sketch a map of the holy centers and cultic itineraries, focusing on case studies from Babylonia, Assyria and Syria from the third to the first millennium BC as well as comparative case studies from surrounding cultures. These topics will be explored with an emphasis on how written and archaeological sources can be interpreted with the help of theoretical literature. There are no prerequisites.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 1300 - The Age of Empires:
The Ancient Near East in the First Millennium BC
The first millennium saw a series of empires vying for control of the Near East: the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Persians, and the Greeks of Alexander the Great and his successors.  The course will explore the political, social and cultural history of Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East under these empires, using evidence drawn from archaeology and ancient texts (in translation).
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 1500 - Ancient Babylonian Magic and Medicine
A survey of ancient magic and medicine focusing on Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq, ca. 2500-300 BCE), with an emphasis on beliefs about the body, health, illness, and the causes of disease, such as witchcraft or angry gods. Topics will include the training of healers, exorcists, and herbalists; concepts of contagion and plague, modalities of treatment, incantations, prayers, and empirical remedies like prescriptions; ancient perceptions of problems like sexual dysfunction, the perils of pregnancy, tooth decay, epilepsy, and mental illness. Readings will be drawn from ancient texts (in translation), archaeology, and parallels with ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the Bible. No prerequisites. Not open to first year students. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1600 - Astronomy Before the Telescope
This course provides an introduction to the history of astronomy from ancient times down to the invention of the telescope, focusing on the development of astronomy in Babylon, Greece, China, the medieval Islamic world, and Europe. The course will cover topics such as the invention of the zodiac, cosmological models, early astronomical instruments, and the development of astronomical theories. We will also explore the reasons people practiced astronomy in the past. No prior knowledge of astronomy is necessary for this course.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 1650 - Time in the Ancient World
Time plays many roles in civic and everyday life: calendars provide a way of regulating activities ranging from gathering taxes to knowing when to perform religious rituals. This course will provide an introduction to the way time was measured, used, regulated and conceived in the ancient world. We will cover topics such as the calendars used in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and China, sundials and other instruments used for measuring time in the ancient world, and the way time is used in scientific and non-scientific texts. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1700 - Astronomy, Divination and Politics in the Ancient World
This course will explore the relationship between astronomy, divination and politics in the ancient world. The sky provided ancient cultures with many possibilities for observing occurrences that could be interpreted as omens. In many cultures, celestial omens were directed towards the king and his government. As a result, interpreting and controlling celestial omens became an important political activity. In this course, we will explore how and why astronomical events were used politically in ancient Mesopotamia, the Greco-Roman world, and ancient and medieval China. No prior knowledge of astronomy is necessary for this course. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1750 - Divination in Ancient Mesopotamia
The interpretation of natural events as portents of good or bad outcomes played an important role in religious, political, scholarly and everyday life in ancient Mesopotamia. In this course we will study Mesopotamian omen literature from textual, scientific, philosophical and cultural viewpoints in order to understand how divination operated and what it was used for. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 1800 - Scribes and Scholarship in the Ancient Near East
This course will explore the development of written traditions among the scribes of the Ancient Near East. Topics covered include the mechanics of writing on clay tablets, the training of scribes and the school curriculum, the status of scribes in society, the development of literary and scholarly traditions, the creation of tablet archives, and the range of scholarship (eg science, medicine, ritual, literature) found in the ancient near east.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 1850 - Assurbanipal's Library in the British Museum
(new course scheduled for Spring 2016)

ASYR 2120 - Historiography of Exact Sciences
Introduces graduate students to the sources, problems, and methodologies of the history of astronomy and mathematics from Babylon to Kepler. Prerequisite: AWAS 0200. Open to graduate students only.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2310 - Ancient Scientific Texts
Readings and analysis of a major scientific text in Akkadian, Arabic, Greek, Latin, or Sanskrit. May be repeated with a different text.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Do not Schedule

ASYR 2310A - Ancient Scientific Texts: Akkadian
Readings and analysis of a major scientific text in Akkadian. Prerequisite:
AWAS 0200 or 0210. Open to graduate students only.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2310B - Assyriology I
The kings of Babylonia and Assyria took every opportunity to boast about their military victories, successful hunts, the completion of new cities, and the building and decoration of temples and palaces. But is theirs the only possible version of Mesopotamian history? This course examines episodes in the history of Babylonia and Assyria (ca. 2400-500BCE) by looking at the political and social relationships among kings, political elites, entrepreneurs, and commoners; emphasis is placed on reading Akkadian texts both in the original and in translation, with a focus on letters, royal inscriptions, and astrological reports. Prerequisite: AWAS 0210 or instructor's permission. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 2310C - Assyriology II
This seminar will focus on selected topics of Neo-Assyrian history (1000-612 BC), including: the royal family; the queen and her influence; celebrating New Year's festivals; hunting lions; conquering a city; constructing and decorating palaces and temples; urban renewal and the founding of new cities; the substitute king ritual; and scholarly life. Assyria in the first millennium BC will be examined principally from Assyrian texts in translation. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

ASYR 2310D - Ancient Scientific Texts: Cuneiform Literature
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2400 - Akkadian Literary and Religious Texts
Readings in Akkadian literary and religious texts in the original language and script. Possible genres includes myths, proverbs, and literary miscellanea as well as prayers, hymns, incantations, rituals, prophecies, and divinatory texts.  This course is intended primarily for graduate students and may be repeated for credit.  A reading knowledge of Akkadian cuneiform is required.  A reading knowledge of both German and French is recommended but not required.
Prerequisites ASYR 0210 or instructor's consent.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2450 - Akkadian Texts from the Late Bronze Age
(new course scheduled for Fall 2015)

ASYR 2500 - Readings in Sumerian
Advanced readings in Sumerian cuneiform texts in the original script and language.  Readings will be selected from a particular genre, historical period, or site. This course is intended primarily for graduate students and may be repeated for credit.  A reading knowledge of Sumerian cuneiform is required.  A reading knowledge of both German and French is strongly recommended but not required.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2600 - Topics in Cuneiform Studies
Advanced readings in Akkadian and Sumerian cuneiform texts in the original script and language(s). The focus of this course will be on the close reading of a specific genre, period, and/or dialect. A rotating cycle of topics to be covered may include the following with a synchronic and/or diachronic approach: historical texts and royal inscriptions, legal and administrative texts, letters, literary and religious texts, medical texts, or scholastic texts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: AWAS 0210 or instructor permission. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2700 - Special Topics in Ancient Sciences
This course will be a topics course containing a detailed technical and cultural study of an area of science in a culture of the ancient world. Although intended for graduate students, undergraduate students who have taken EGYT 1600 or ASYR 1600 or a similar course may be admitted at the instructor's discretion.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2750 - Art and Visual Culture in the Ancient Near East
Peoples of the Ancient Near East from prehistory to the Hellenistic period produced a unique corpus of production technologies and visual culture. Cultures from Anatolia to the Iraqi southern alluvium, from the Levant to Iran and the Caucasus shared this common pictorial language in a variety of ways. In this seminar, we will investigate bodies of archaeological, architectural and pictorial evidence from the Near East while also debating relevant art and architecture historical methodologies and discourses in direct relationship to that material. Conceptual issues such as narrative, representation, perspective, agency, technology, style, symbolism, landscape, space, and power will be explored. Enrollment limited to 15.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2800 - Archaeologies of Text
An interdisciplinary seminar that examines the interplay between ancient texts and archaeology in the study of the ancient world. Emphasis will be placed on articulating and analyzing the research methods and assumptions found in case studies set in the ancient Near East, Mediterranean, East Asia, and the Americas. Topics will include: canons of literature as/versus ancient inscriptions; materiality of text; texts on display, in deposits, in archives, in libraries, as refuse; literacy and education; practices of documentation and analysis; writing, language, and 'ethnicity'; historical geography; fakes and forgeries; ancient texts and archaeological ethics. No prerequisites. Intended primarily for graduate students.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2900 - Introduction to Hittite Language and Literature
This course is an introduction to Hittite language, literature, and culture. Hittite, the earliest attested Indo-European language (thus related to Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit) was used in Anatolia during the second millennium BCE. It survives in tens of thousands of tablets written in cuneiform script. Students will learn the basic grammar of the language and read in the original or in translation specimens from the fascinating textual legacy of the Hittites, which includes myths, prayers, laws, diplomatic texts as well as formal and informal letters. They will also become familiar with the cultural environment in which those texts were composed.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

ASYR 2950 - Scribal and Scholarly Practices in Babylonia and Assryia
(new course scheduled for Spring 2016)

ASYR 2980 - Reading and Research
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
1.000 TO 5.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 5.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study/Research

ASYR 2990 - Thesis Preparation
For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

EGYPTOLOGY

EGYT 0300 - In the Beginning: Creation and Cosmos in the Ancient World
(new course scheduled for Spring 2016 FYS)

EGYT 1200 - Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
A general survey of the archaeology of ancient Egypt in prehistoric and Pharaonic times. Covers such areas as the development of private and royal funerary monuments, private and royal dwellings, and temples. Attention is also paid to the principles of Egyptian art and architecture and, where appropriate, to archaeological connections with the surrounding cultures. Offered in alternate years.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours

EGYT 1210 - Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
See Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (EG0120) for description.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1310 - Introduction to Classical Hieroglyphic Egyptian Writing and Language (Middle Egyptian I)
Much of this two-semester sequence is spent learning the signs, vocabulary, and grammar of one of the oldest languages known. By the end of this introductory year, students read authentic texts of biographical, historical, and literary significance. The cornerstone course in the Department of Egyptology-essential for any serious work in this field and particularly recommended for students in archaeology, history, classics, and religious studies. No prerequisites.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

 EGYT 1320 - Introduction to Classical Hieroglyphic Egyptian Writing and Language (Middle Egyptian II)
Continuation of a two-semester sequence spent learning the signs, vocabulary, and grammar of one of the oldest languages known. By the end of this introductory year, students read authentic texts of biographical, historical, and literary significance. The cornerstone course in the Department of Egyptology - essential for any serious work in this field and particularly recommended for students in archaeology, history, classics, and religious studies. Prerequisite: EGYT 1310.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1330 - Selections from Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts
Readings from the various genres of classical Egyptian literature, including stories and other literary texts, historical inscriptions, and religious compositions. Students will be expected to translate and discuss assigned texts. Prerequisite: EGYT 1310, 1320.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
 
EGYT 1340 - Selections from Middle Egyptian Hieratic Texts
Introduction to the hieratic script and readings from a variety of hieratic documents, including literary compositions, letters, and religious texts. Students will be expected to translate and discuss assigned texts. Prerequisite: EG 131, 132 (EGYT 1310, 1320).
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
 
EGYT 1410 - Ancient Egyptian Literature
A survey of one of the most intriguing aspects of ancient Egyptian culture. Readings (in translation) of many of the most significant literary documents that survive from Egypt. Presentation of a reasonable amount of historical perspective. Class discussions concerning the nature, purpose, quality, and effectiveness of the works read. Two term papers. No prerequisites. Offered in alternate years. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

EGYT 1420 - Ancient Egyptian Religion and Magic
An overview of ancient Egyptian religion from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective. Examines such topics as the Egyptian pantheon, cosmology, cosmogony, religious anthropology, personal religion, magic, and funerary beliefs. Introduces the different genres of Egyptian religious texts in translation. Also treats the archaeological evidence which contributes to our understanding of Egyptian religion, including temple and tomb architecture and decoration. Midterm and final exams; one research paper. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

EGYT 1430 - History of Egypt I
A survey of the history and society of ancient Egypt from prehistoric times to the end of the Eighteenth Dynasty (ca. 5000-1300 BC). Readings include translations from the original documents that serve as primary sources for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian history. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

EGYT 1440 - History of Egypt II
A survey of the history and society of ancient Egypt from the Ramesside Period to the Roman conquest (ca. 1300-30 BC). Readings include translations from the original documents that serve as primary sources for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian history.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1455 - Black Pharaohs: Nubian Rule Over Egypt in the 25th Dynasty
The course will cover Egypt's 25th Dynasty (728-657 BC), when rulers of Nubia, located in the region of modern Sudan, added Egypt to their territories. Using a wide range of textual and archaeological evidence, students will learn about the history of famous 'black pharaohs' such as Taharqa and study some of Africa's most impressive archaeological remains. This fascinating period is not well understood and has often been afflicted in the past by racist, colonialist scholarship; using primary sources and recent theory on ethnic identity, this class will re-examine the complex and changing relationship between Egypt and Nubia.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1465 - Daily Life in Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt is remembered for its grand temples and enduring tombs. Histories too often favor these examples of grandeur, forgetting the daily lives of non-royal ancient Egyptians.  This class will investigate the daily lives of those underrepresented ancient Egyptians - craftsmen, servants, women, children - and address concerns such as illness, status, economy, magic and death.  Additionally, we will look at the individual and discuss sexuality, love, style and fashion, religious practice and the family.  Class format will include lectures and discussions, presentations and tours through virtual temples which will enable us to reconstruct the daily lives of Ancient Egyptians. 
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1470 - Egypt After the Pharaohs:
Archaeology and Society in the Coptic and Early Islamic Periods
The history of Egypt may be famous for the tombs, pyramids and mummies of the Pharaonic periods. This course, however, offers a vision of a different Egypt, a later Egypt: one that evolved from the traditions of the past but was infused by Christianity, Islam, Arabic, and the emergence of one of the world's great cities: Cairo. Students will experience the heritage of Egypt that is contained in the mosque of al-Azhar, the monasteries of the Egyptian desert, and the pageantry and ritual of a new set of ruling elites. At the same time they will understand the continuities of this land which Egyptians refer to as Umm al-Duniya "Mother of the World".
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT1485 - Medicine and Physicians in Ancient Egypt
The course explores medical practices and beliefs, including healing magic, in ancient Egypt, from the beginning of the Old Kingdom to the end of the Roman period, drawing evidence from both ancient texts (in translation) and archaeological sources. In addition to surveying ancient Egyptian medical practices, the course investigates the social world of the physicians and their patients, and their views on their bodies and illnesses. Topics surveyed include medical handbooks and recipes, physicians’ equipment and training, gods, demons and disease, pregnancy and childbirth, veterinary medicine, the health effects of the ancient Egyptian diet, and later myths about Egyptian medical knowledge. DPLL WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1490 - Calendars and Chronology in
Ancient Egypt and the Ancient World
Time is the dimension of history. Chronology studies how we know when events happened. Chronology is much more important to "BC history" than to "AD history." History books state that the great Ramses II ruled around the thirteenth century B.C.E. But how do we know this? The focus of this class is on the answers to such questions through the study of the foundations of the history of Egypt specifically and of the ancient world in general. Some prior knowledge of Egyptian language or civilization might be handy but is by no means required.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1500 - Ancient Egyptian Art and Architecture
Ancient Egyptian art and architecture had a remarkably long history, and much that was produced is amazingly well preserved. This course will focus on the inception and development of these material expressions of high culture through detailed studies of monumental buildings and decorated private tombs, as well as the sculpture, painting, and minor arts from the Predynastic period through the end of the Middle Kingdom (c. 3700-1790 BC). Enrollment limited to 20.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1510 - Ancient Egyptian Art II
Considers the art of ancient Egypt's New Kingdom or Empire Period (1500-1100 B.C.). The relief carving and painting of Theban temples and tombs are studied in detail, and the developments leading to the revolutionary Amarna style of art is carefully analyzed. Decorative arts, Tutankhamun's treasures, and recent exciting discoveries are all surveyed. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

EGYT 1520 - The Archaeology of
Ancient Egyptian Household and Settlement
Survey of the primary settlement remains from the Pharaonic Period of ancient Egypt, addressing the practices and problems in settlement and household archaeology. Not open to first year students.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 1910 - Senior Seminar
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study/Research

EGYT 1920 - Senior Seminar
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study/Research

EGYT 2210 - Introduction to Coptic
Coptic, the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language, was written with essentially Greek alphabetic characters. An introduction to Sahidic, which is perhaps the best represented of the Coptic dialects. Sahidic grammar is explained, and some texts, mainly of a biblical and patristic nature, are read. Open to undergraduates with the consent of the instructor. No prerequisites, but a knowledge of Middle Egyptian or Greek would be helpful.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2300 - Readings in Ancient Egyptian
Advanced readings in ancient Egyptian texts in the original script and language. Readings will be selected from a particular genre, historical period, or site. This course is intended primarily for graduate students and may be repeated for credit. A reading knowledge of ancient Egyptian is required. A reading knowledge of both German and French is strongly recommended but not required.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2310 - History of the Ancient Egyptian Language
Diachronic survey of ancient Egyptian from Old Egyptian through Coptic, covering changes in phonology and grammar and analyzing the processes through which these changes took place. Course requirements are short research papers to be presented in class and a final examination. Previous course work in at least one stage of the Egyptian language required; knowledge of Late Egyptian, Demotic (grammar) or Coptic preferable. Prerequisites: EGYT 1310 and EGYT 1320, plus either EGYT 2210, EGYT 2410 or EGYT 2610.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2410 - Late Egyptian
Introduction to the grammar of the third historical phase of ancient Egyptian and readings from its various genres, including literary texts, letters, historical inscriptions, and tomb-robbing papyri. Students will be expected to translate and discuss assigned texts. Prerequisites: EGYT 1310, 1320.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2510 - Social Life in Ancient Egypt
This course will provide a valuable opportunity to link theory and data innovatively. Taking the lifecycle as its structure, it covers Egyptian life from conception to death and the afterlife, drawing together a range of data sources, such as material culture, iconography, textual data, and human remains. WRIT
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting
Course Attributes:
Writing - Designated Courses

EGYT 2610 - Introduction to Demotic
Begins with discussions and exercises in the grammar and peculiar script of this late stage of the Egyptian language, followed by readings of actual ancient texts, including The Instructions of Onkhsheshonkhy,The Petition of Petiese, and The Story of Setne Khaemwas. Knowledge of Demotic remains essential for a proper understanding of Egypt during the Saite, Persian, Ptolemaic, and Roman periods. Open to undergraduates with consent of instructor. Prerequisites: EGYT 2410 or 2210.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2810 - Old Egyptian
Introduction to the grammar of the first historical phase of ancient Egyptian and readings from its two primary genres, the Pyramid Texts and autobiographical inscriptions. Students will be expected to translate and discuss assigned texts. Prerequisites: EG 131, 132 (EGYT 1310, 1320).
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2850 - Images, Ideology, and Egyptian Warfare
Images of violence and warfare are pervasive in Egypt, but their interpretation is not straightforward. What relationship is there between such images and historical events, ritual events, and royal ideology? How do such images function? This seminar will examine Egyptian images of violence and warfare from before the New Kingdom. It will take a contextual and comparative approach to discern patterns in the ways such images are used, with the goal being to understand why they were made rather than how they can be used to answer historical questions.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2900 - Egyptian Art in New England Museums
This seminar will be an in-depth, in-person study of Egyptian art from before the New Kingdom focusing on the entire life-history of Egyptian art in all available media and genres. This course will alternate between meeting in the classroom and meeting in museums.  Classroom days will be devoted to discussion of the contexts, meanings, and uses of Egyptian art. Museum days will be devoted to the close observation of that art, and discussion of both its formal properties and the technological processes that were used in its creation. Consideration of conservation and display will also be paramount importance.  This course can not be repeated for credit. Enrollment limit 10 Space in museums is limited.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Primary Meeting

EGYT 2970 - Preliminary Examination Preparation
For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

EGYT 2980 - Reading and Research
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
1.000 TO 5.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 5.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study/Research

EGYT 2990 - Thesis Preparation
For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
Levels: Graduate, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep