Courses for Fall 2015

  • Devils, Demons, and Do Gooders

    Who hasn't struggled with the problem of good and evil? Who hasn't wondered what lurks in the dark recesses of the soul? We will investigate how Milton, Mary Shelley, Melville, Poe, and Hawthorne, among others, grapple with these fundamental questions of judgment.
    ENGL 0100F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Love Stories

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day until the present. Readings to include Shakespeare, Austen, the Bronte sisters, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and contemporary short stories.
    ENGL 0100P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Being Romantic

    "Romantic literature" and "Romantic art" are familiar concepts in the history of culture. But what does "Romantic" actually mean? Were Coleridge and Keats especially dedicated to writing about erotic love? Why would "Romantic" literature emerge during the period of the French Revolution and Industrial Revolution? What does early 19th-century "Romanticism" have to do with the meaning and status of the "Romantic" in our culture today? Readings in British and American writing from Blake and Mary Shelley to Ani DiFranco and Rage Against the Machine.
    ENGL 0100S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • The Simple Art of Murder

    A survey of the history of criminal enterprise in American literature. Authors to be considered include Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, Chandler, Wright, Petry, Highsmith, Millar, Harris, and Mosley. Students who have taken ENGL 0560D may not register for this course. Students should register for ENGL 0100T S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • The Medieval King Arthur

    Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS WRIT
    ENGL 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Inventing America

    One of the distinguishing features of American literature may be its seemingly constant struggle with the idea of America itself. For what, these authors wonder, does/should America stand? We will examine the rhetorical battles waged in some major works over the meaning and/or meanings of America’s national identity. Authors may include Franklin, Hawthorne, and Fitzgerald. Limited to 20 first-year students. Instructor permission required. FYS LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0150J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Realism and Modernism

    The novel as a genre has been closely identified with the act of representation. What it means to represent "reality," however, has varied widely. This seminar will explore how the representation of reality changes as modern fiction questions the assumptions about knowing, language, and society that defined the great tradition of realism. English and American novels will be the primary focus of our attention, but influential French, German, and Russian works will be studied as well. Limited to 20 first-year students. Banner registration after classes begin requires instructor approval. FYS LILE
    ENGL 0150Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Queer and Feminist Poetics: Hybrid Forms, 1969 to Present

    How do queer and feminist text engage formal experiment? This course will explore the political, conceptual, and rhetorical uses of queer and feminist discourses in contemporary hybrid-genre writing. William S. Burroughs, Kathy Acker, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jack Spicer, Alice Notley, CAConrad, Christian Hawkey, and Ronaldo Wilson. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Apps
  • The Art of Catastrophe: Crisis and Collapse in the American Literary Landscape

    How have contemporary thinkers grappled with great crises -- environmental, economic, spiritual, terroristic -- in the 20th century? From catastrophic events like 9/11 to volatile conflicts involving race and gender, this course assesses contemporary literary and cinematic representations of crisis by probing their political and aesthetic significance. Authors may include: West, Ward, DeLillo, Hamid, Ozeki; Films include Soylent Green, Dawn of the Dead, The Reluctant Fundamentalist. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gullander-Drolet
  • Shakespeare: The Screenplays

    It's been said that if Shakespeare were alive today he'd be working in Hollywood. We will read five or six plays (including at least one representative of each of Shakespeare's genres: comedy, history, tragedy, romance) and then study film adaptations of them. The course is especially concerned with various approaches to the Shakespeare film: not just the straightforward adaptation, but also the Shakespeare spin-off ("10 Things"; "My Own Private Idaho"), the Shakespeare film as a star-turn (Helen Mirren as "Prospera" in Taymor's "Tempest"), and the Shakespeare film as an auteur-turn (Orson Welles's "Chimes at Midnight"; Polanski's "Macbeth").
    ENGL 0310E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • The Examined Self: Lives of the Soul

    The literature of spiritual awakening and struggle in fiction, autobiography, and poetry in America and Britain, and over a long historical span. Readings will include travel and religious conversion, slave narrative, lyric poems, and novels like "Huckleberry Finn" and Kerouac's "On the Road." There is a transatlantic emphasis on movement and emigration. It attends to close readings of literary works staging the possibilities of redemption and captivity shape personal and collective quest, and pays particular attention to spiritual autobiography as a literary form. Limited to 30 students.
    ENGL 0500P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • New Worlds, New Subjects: American Fiction at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century

    In 1900, the historian Henry Adams declared, Americans lived in a world so radically transformed that “the new American … must be a sort of God compared with any former creation of nature.” This new world had many progenitors: Darwin’s theory of evolution; Nietzsche’s theory of the will; Freud’s theory of the unconscious; the rise of the mass media; the industrial production line; the triumph of consumerism; mass immigration; Jim Crow; the New Woman. This class reads works of fiction from the turn-of-the-century in the context of these transformations. Writers include Freud, Nietzsche, Stephen Crane, Henry James, and Edith Wharton.
    ENGL 0510G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Cultures of Vision in 19th-Century America

    This course investigates the dynamic power of vision and the visual in nineteenth-century American cultural contexts. We will especially consider how technological advancements in the manufacturing of images and the privileging of sight influenced a host of American literary genres and thereby impacted broader concerns involving the formation of U.S. social and political cultures. To this end, we will examine the role of eyewitness observation, the pseudoscience of physiognomy, and scenes of artistic and sartorial spectacularity in travel narratives, novels, children's textbooks, and abolitionist propaganda.
    ENGL 0510X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
  • Dickens: The Novel and Society

    This course rehabilitates Charles Dickens from his reputation as a mainstream writer paid by the word, most famous as the author of sentimental, implausible works for children, such as A Christmas Carol. We will be looking at Dickens’s social novels as a formally innovative response to the urban and industrial capitalism of his time. Issues will include: realism, the relation of his fiction to his journalism, serial form, and representations of work, the city, and bureaucracy.
    ENGL 0511A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • City Novels

    This course examines 20th and 21st century novels to consider how these narratives envision the city, its possibilities and limits. How does the city shape how we think, wander, grow up, see and know each other? How does the city divide people? How does the novel imagine ways to bridge those divisions? Readings by Woolf, Wright, Calvino, Adiga, Whitehead. Preference given to English and Urban Studies concentrators. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Poetic Cosmologies

    This course will examine how various traditions within modern and contemporary poetry have addressed the question of materiality. Readings will range from poetic explorations of the archaeologies of place by William Carlos Williams and Charles Olson, to the investigations of non-human materialities of crystals, clouds and bacteria by writers such as Clark Coolidge, Christian Bök and Lisa Robertson.
    ENGL 0700Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • African American Literature and the Legacy of Slavery

    Traces the relationship between the African American literary tradition and slavery from the antebellum slave narrative to the flowering of historical novels about slavery at the end of the twentieth century. Positions these texts within specific literary, historical, and political frameworks. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison. DPLL
    ENGL 0710B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Ishiguro, Amongst Others

    Kazuo Ishiguro is one of the most distinctive and enigmatic voices in contemporary fiction. He has few obvious precursors, and there is little consensus among literary critics about the meanings of his works. This course will try to establish principles for reading Ishiguro's works by seeking alliances for his writing in works of philosophy, literature and cinema. Such interlocutors will include Ozu, Kiarostami, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Hadžihalilovič, Dostoevsky, Pasolini.
    ENGL 0710L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0900 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0900 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Walker
    ENGL 0900 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Snow
    ENGL 0900 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rada
    ENGL 0900 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Wang
    ENGL 0900 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    ENGL 0900 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Wasserman
    ENGL 0900 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Thomas
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for ENGL 1180. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • Research Essay: The Thoughtful Generalist

    This section of “ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research” will prepare you for academic and real world discourse. We will study essays by well-regarded writers as examples of deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. In practice you will generate, research, plan, draft, and revise four essays, moving from explanatory to analytical to persuasive essays, and culminating in a final research project grappling with varied sources to explore a subject, issue, or artist of your choice. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Research Essay: Investigative Nonfiction

    This class is founded on the idea that research is a creative act in and of itself. Using a series of real-world drills we will explore the local archives, court documents, libraries, and electronic resources that are essential to investigative nonfiction. Additionally, we will look at a number of contemporary texts to examine how scholars, professional writers and journalists have integrated their research into their writing. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • True Stories

    This class will allow confident writers to explore and develop their creative nonfiction writing. We'll focus on two structures--nonfiction narratives and essays--with occasional forays into other forms. Students will work simultaneously on several small assignments and two larger, self-directed pieces. Readings will include cultural reportage, lyric memoir, science and nature writing, standard and hybrid essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pultizer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 1050G S02
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Multimedia Nonfiction

    In this class students will write and explore essays that focus on the meaningful integration of images, videos, and web tools with traditional nonfiction subgenres. No previous digital experience is necessary. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Flash Nonfiction

    The nonfiction "short" is an old and shape-shifting form, ranging from 250 to 2000 words. You will study and imitate historical and contemporary short forms of the nonfiction list, scene, letter, prose poem, essay, memoir, story, profile, and history. Inspirations will come from international and North American authors -- including Jean Toomer, Kenneth Koch, Margaret Atwood, Amy Hempel, Naomi Shihab Nye, John Edgar Wideman, Richard Rodriguez, and Dave Eggers. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Literary Journalism: Writing about Politics and Culture

    Students are introduced to procedures and techniques of cultural journalism through reading and discussing work of notable practitioners and writing their own reviews, profiles, and reportage. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisites: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any intermediate or advanced nonfiction course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1160G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sarwar
  • Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing with Food

    This course examines writing about food and how writing affects food and food culture. We shall explore the relationship of food to the pen through reading classic texts, writing in and out of class, guest lectures, and touring culinary archives. The goal is to polish personal voice in menus, recipes, memoir, history, reportage, and the lyric essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
  • The Art of Literary Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0180 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    For students accepted as Writing Fellows, this course offers the study of literary essays and composition theory to help develop their own writing with a critical awareness of the elements of an essay. Students will write essays throughout the semester and will confer with each other for every paper, thereby gaining experience in peer tutoring and becoming better writers through the help of an informed peer. They will also respond to the writing of a cohort of students in another designated Writing Fellows class. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Tabak
  • The Art of Memoir in Theory and Practice

    The course introduces students to the historical and theoretical nuances of memoir. You will critically engage with a variety of readings and develop an appreciation of your creative role as a memoirist. In the process of crafting a portfolio of work you will explore the complexities of remembering and experiment with the style of narrative voice and structure. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • From Mead-Hall to Mordor: The Celtic and Germanic Roots of Tolkien’s Fiction

    This course traces the sources used by J.R.R. Tolkien in writing The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, which include tales drawn from Old English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish literature. You will be introduced to different medieval genres as you consider how the nature and gender of the hero changes in specific cultural and linguistic moments.
    ENGL 1311L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Introduction to the Old English Language

    This course offers a thorough introduction to the earliest period of English language and literature. We begin with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax before reading short texts and a few Old English poems, including The Battle of Brunanburh and Judith. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1360H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Europe in the Vernacular

    Why did a few early medieval European authors write not in Latin or Arabic but in vernacular languages like Castilian, Early Middle English, Old Icelandic, or Old French? We will read primary texts by Layamon, Alfonso X, Dante, troubadours and anonymous others, and assess previous claims about the "rise of the individual" and various proto-nationalisms as we rewrite the story of how, why, and for whom multilingual vernacular writings came to be. Readings in modern English supplemented by medieval languages. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Not open to first-year students. Sophomores require instructor permission to register.
    ENGL 1360U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Jane Austen and Her Predecessors: The Other History of the Novel

    This course focuses on the novels of Jane Austen — from Sense and Sensibility to Persuasion. The course first establishes some familiarity with the earlier women writers of narrative fiction, in order to gain a deeper understanding of the development of the novel and of Austen's place in that rich tradition. Additional readings include work by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Lennox, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Mary Wollstonecraft.
    ENGL 1510A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • On Being Bored

    This course explores texts/films that represent and formally express states of non-productivity or non-desire. Beginning with the Enlightenment and romantic periods, we will reflect on narratives with neither progress nor plot, characters that resist characterization, and poems that deny assertion and revelation. Authors include: Kleist, Kant, Rousseau, Coleridge, de Quincey, Keats, Blanchot, Levinas, Beckett, Ashbery, Schuyler.
    ENGL 1511L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Writing and the Ruins of Empire

    An exploration of literary representations of "empire" and "imperialism" from the 18th century to the present. Readings in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volney's Ruins of Empire, and a wide range of 19th- and 20th-century texts. Some consideration of theories of imperialism and of visual representations of cultures of empire. Enrollment limited to 20. Prior coursework in 18th- and 19th-century literature advised. WRIT
    ENGL 1561D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

    After almost two decades of closure, public theaters re-opened in 1660. This new beginning occasioned new plays, new kinds of performance and production, and new intersections between the stage and society. We will study works by Etherege, Wycherly, Congreve, Dryden, Behn, Gay, Lillo, Sheridan, and others. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1561K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Oedipus in Myth, Tragedy, and Theory

    This course is an intensive study of Oedipus Rex, as well as an introduction to the debates and responses it has occasioned. It spans several disciplines, from the classics to philosophy to psychoanalysis to literary theory, following the trajectory of this single figure. Readings: Sophocles, Aristotle, Hegel, Rancière, Girard, Foucault, Freud, and Bernard Williams. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S56
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Faulkner

    In examining Faulkner's major works from the early stream-of-consciousness novels through the history-driven and race-inflected texts of the 30s and 40s, this course will evaluate Faulkner's practice as a writer working both in and against Southern culture, and as Modernist writing within an international context. Issues include narrative experimentation, race, class, gender, and the evolution of Faulkner's work. Students should register for ENGL 1710G S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 1710G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
  • Modern African Literature

    This course considers themes, antecedents, and contexts of modern African literature and related forms. Our readings will include fiction in English or in translation, traditional oral forms like panegyric and festival poetry, and some films. We will examine how these diverse materials explore the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will also address the issue of "tradition" in contexts where nationalisms of various stripes are becoming stronger, even as the world becomes more interconnected through trade, immigration, and digital technology. Authors include Achebe, Cole, Dangarembga, Farah, Gordimer, Ngugi, Salih, Soyinka, Wicomb. Films by Blomkamp, Loreau, Sembène. DPLL
    ENGL 1710J S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Literature and the Problem of Poverty

    Explores poverty as a political and aesthetic problem for the American novelist. Examines the ways that writers have imagined the poor as dangerous others, agents of urban decay, bearers of folk culture, and engines of class revolt. Also considers these literary texts in relation to historical debates about economic inequality. Writers may include Crane, Faulkner, Wright, Steinbeck, and Hurston.
    ENGL 1710K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • American Modernism and its Aftermaths

    An interdisciplinary study of the rise modernist aesthetic theory in the United States, its dissemination across various aesthetic (poetry, fiction, various plastic arts) and intellectual (economics, sociology, political theory) fields, and its persistence in United States intellectual life in the various permutations of postmodernism that have succeeded it. Authors to be considered include: poets such as Eliot, Williams, Bishop, Brooks, and Ashbery; novelists such as Faulkner, Hurston, O'Connor, and Didion; aesthetic theorists such as Greenberg, Rosenberg, Fried, Baraka and Kraus; and social theorists such as von Neuman, Rawls, Cavell, Kuhn, Samuelsohn, Drucker, and Friedman. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1760U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Perverse Cinema

    A seminar on movies that pursue and spectacularize the perverse, as well as on how viewing movies is itself a perverse pleasure. We will study film genres that traffic in what's sensational, excessive, uncanny, and transgressive, such as the detective film, thriller, melodrama, sex film, horror, and sci-fi. Special emphasis on the movies of Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch, and Cronenberg. Enrollment limited to 20 concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, MCM, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Theatre and Performance Studies. Not open to first year students.
    ENGL 1762A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Invisibility and Impersonality in Modern American Fiction

    The nineteenth century American novel features identifiable people doing identifiable things: escaping slavery, chasing whales, going to war. The twentieth century American novel, in contrast, depicts anonymous, blank, invisible people who don’t do much of anything, bound by economic, political, psychological, and social forces outside of their control. This class reads major works of twentieth century American fiction by Nabokov, Faulkner, Ellison, Pynchon, and Highsmith in the context of various accounts of the death of the subject by Nietzsche, Freud, Benjamin, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, Butler, Zizek. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors in English, Comparative Literature, MCM, and Literary Arts.
    ENGL 1762E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality

    A study of the relationship between aesthetic thought and sexuality in a variety of literary and cinematic works. We will supplement our readings with ventures into queer theory, emphasizing how art is related to identity, community, race, gender, and ethics. Authors include Wilde, Pater, James, Winterson, Cole, Guibert, Foucault, Bersani, Edelman. Films by Julien and Jarman. DPLL
    ENGL 1900R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Neuroaesthetics and Reading

    Analysis of the theories of art, reading, and aesthetic experience proposed by neuroscience and cognitive science in light of traditional aesthetics and contemporary literary theory. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: At least one course on neuroscience or cognitive science and one 1000-level literature course. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1900Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Reading Narrative Theory

    Narrative is a powerful category of analysis that spans genres, historical periods, media forms, and the distinction between the "fictional" and the "real." This course examines major narrative theorists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will focus on literary examples, such as theories of the folktale and novel but will also consider scholars who interrogate the work of narrative in historiography, in cinema and television, and in extra-literary contexts (in the struggle of political campaigners to “control the narrative” or debates on narrative in gaming, medical research, law, and theory itself). Limited to 20 seniors. Preference to English concentrators.
    ENGL 1950G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Hamlet: Appropriation, Mediation, Theory

    Close study of Shakespeare's Hamlet in relation to critical and theoretical discourses it has prompted over four centuries including Romantic; psychoanalytic, and deconstructive. Consideration of texts prompted by Hamlet by Goethe, Eliot, Zbignew Herbert, Stoppard, and Hamlet films including Kozintsev, Olivier, Branagh, Chabrol and Almereyda. The course ends with Hamlet in the Arab world. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2360X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Racial Lives of Affect

    This course explores both dominant and emergent theoretical paradigms that anatomize the affective dimensions of racialized subjectivity in the United States from the 19th-century to the present. We begin with African American and Asian American works that render the violence of racism and empire as gendered traumas. We then address works that examine the more quotidian textures of racialized embodied feeling. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Postcoloniality and Globalism

    Seminar focuses on intersections and disjunctions between two currents in contemporary literary and cultural criticism: “postcolonial theory” and “world literature theory.” We read theoretical statements alongside imaginative literature by writers and critics associated with concepts of postcoloniality, globalism, and diaspora. We thereby stage encounters between theoretical and literary texts in order to explore the varied idioms, genres, and philosophical provocations that the authors present. Themes include: nationalism and “national consciousness”; biopower and “bare life”; historicity and temporality. Texts by Fanon, Ghosh, Hall, Jameson, Laclau, Naipaul, Phillips, Said, Spivak, Walcott. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2900Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Freedom Without Freedoms

    This seminar, through readings both literary and theoretical, asks why Jean-Luc Nancy would insist that “freedoms”—that is, legal protections and entitlements—cannot grasp the stakes of freedom. What forms can freedom take when it is thought apart from legal provisions? We will consider a wide range of thought on the experience of freedom, from classical practices of the self to liberation from the self, from Christian liberty to liberty realized through love, from self-control to sublime subjection to an “event.” We will also think through the contribution that imaginative literature makes to the question of freedom. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Priority given to students in the English Ph.D. program. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of instructor.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Comparative Literature
    COLT 2650M Literary Theory I: Continental Aesthetics and the Question of Politics
    Judaic Studies
    JUDS 0820 God and Poetry
    ENGL XLIST 0