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News Archive

Study Maps Extroversion Types in the Brain’s Anatomy

Volume of gray matter:

Graduate student Erica Grodin is one of the Brown scientists mapping the similarities and the differences in the brain between the two different kinds of extroverts: “agentic” go-getters and “affiliative” people persons.

MFA Student Directs Brown/Trinity Rep's Pericles

Pericles, directed by Brown/MFA student Dan Rogers, opens February 26 at the Pell Chafee Performance Center. The story centers on Prince Pericles in a competition of wits for the princess’ hand.

New Doctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad

The Global Mobility Program: Graduate Research Fellowship is open to  doctoral students for research abroad during one summer or academic semester. The program aims to expand Brown’s global reach and projects must build upon the University’s integrative themes and yield tangible outcomes. Proposals are due March 18, 2015. Learn more.

Compulsive Internet & Electronics Use: How Much is Too Much?

The third session of the Wellness Series for Graduate Students is on computer and Internet addiction and how to take the necessary steps to control your relationship with electronics. The presentation by Jackie Twitchell, Psy.D., Associate Director of Counseling and Psychological Services, will be held on February 18 at 6 pm in the Faunce Memorial Room, 2nd floor of the Robert Center. Snacks provided. Learn more.

Meteorite May Represent ‘Bulk Background’ of Mars’ Battered Crust

Not red: A piece of Mars:

New spectroscopic analysis of “Black Beauty,” a meteorite found in the Moroccan desert, has given scientists, a better picture of the crust beneath Mars’ red dust. Kevin Cannon, doctoral student in Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences is the lead author of a new paper on the topic.

Reducing Myc Gene Activity Extends Healthy Lifespan in Mice

A team of scientists based at Brown University, including lead author and Pathobiology doctoral student Xiaoai Zhao, have found that reducing expression of a fundamentally important gene called Myc significantly increased the healthy lifespan of laboratory mice, the first such finding regarding this gene in a mammalian species.