Courses for Fall 2015

  • History of Capitalism

    Capitalism didn't just spring from the brain of Adam Smith. Its logic is not encoded on human DNA, and its practices are not the inevitable outcome of supply and demand. So how did capitalism become the dominant economic system of the modern world? History can provide an answer by exploring the interaction of culture and politics, technology and enterprise, and opportunity and exploitation from the era of the Atlantic Slave Trade to the 2008 Financial Crisis. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. This class presumes no economics background, nor previous history courses.
    HIST 0150A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Locked Up: A Global History of Prison and Captivity

    A long history lies behind the millions of men and women locked up today as prisoners, captives and hostages. Beginning in antiquity and ending in the present, this course draws on materials from a variety of cultures across the world to explore incarceration's centuries-old past. In examining the experience and meaning of imprisonment, whether as judicial punishment, political repression, or the fallout of war, the class will ask fundamental questions about liberty as well. History 150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation and argumentation. This course presumes no previous history courses.
    HIST 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • The Making of Modern East Asia

    This course examines Asia in the shaping of the modern world, from competing definitions of empires circa 1800 to the rise of the notion of the twenty-first as a "Pacific Century." It investigates the definition(s) of Asia as a world region, explores transnational interactions and emphasizes Asians as historical actors via written, visual and aural sources. Events are placed in the context of key historical paradigms, including varying definitions of modernity, the rise of the nation-state, birth of mass politics, new mechanisms of war, the language of self-determination, changing views of gender, shifting types of media and consumption, etc. WRIT
    HIST 0218 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Colonial Latin America

    Colonial Latin America, from Columbus's voyage in 1492 to Independence in the nineteenth century, was the creation of three peoples: Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans. Spanish and Portuguese conquerors brought with them the world of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance. Native Americans lived there already, in rich empires and hunter-gatherer bands. Africans came as slaves from Senegal, Nigeria, Congo and Angola, bringing old traditions and creating new ones. These diverse peoples blended together to form a new people. This was a place of violence, slavery and oppression -- but also of art, faith, new societies, new ideas. P WRIT
    HIST 0233 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • The American Civil War

    In this course we will investigate the "felt histories" of the American Civil War—the personal experiences of Americans (northerners and southerners, slaves and freed people, European immigrants and Native Americans, men and women) who fought its battles and bore its consequences. These histories, as Robert Penn Warren notes, are an "index to the very complexity, depth, and fundamental significance" of the conflict. In addition to military and political dimensions we will also examine constructions of Civil War memory (photography, film, and other media) and the dominant narratives that have shaped our understanding of the war since 1865. WRIT
    HIST 0252 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • History of Medicine I: Medical Traditions in the Old World Before 1700

    People have always attempted to promote health and prolong life, and to ameliorate bodily suffering. Those living in parts of Eurasia also developed textual traditions that, together with material remains, allow historians to explore their medical practices and explanations, including changes in their traditions, sometimes caused by interactions with other peoples of Europe, Asia, and Africa. We'll introduce students to major medical traditions of the Old World to 1700, with emphasis on Europe, and explore some reasons for change. A knowledge of languages and the social and natural sciences is welcome not required. P
    HIST 0286A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Christianity in Conflict in the Medieval Mediterranean

    Students in this class will learn about medieval history by taking on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past. Drawing on the innovative “Reacting to the Past” curriculum, this class explores two dramatic moments in medieval history: the debate about Christian belief held at Nicaea in 325 and the deliberations about crusading held at Acre in 1148. Students will adhere to the intellectual beliefs of the medieval figures they have been assigned to play, and will learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, leadership, and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations. FYS P
    HIST 0521A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • Reason, Revolution and Reaction in Europe

    This is a first year seminar designed to introduce students to the study of history through a focused look at the French Revolution. It will be divided into two very different parts. The first part will be organized as a traditional history seminar in which we explore together the eighteenth-century developments that preceded the outbreak of the French Revolution. In the second half of the class, students will be assigned different roles in order to re-enact the discussions in the National Assembly that, from 1791 to its collapse in 1792, tried to create a constitution for the new French Nation. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0522N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • The Enlightenment

    The Enlightenment: Introduction to the Enlightenment as a fragmented series of projects that aimed at human liberation and the understanding of the social and natural worlds, with massive implications for the way that we conceive of ourselves today. Readings explore philosophy, science, slavery, economics, gender relations, and politics in the 18th century. FYS
    HIST 0522O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Revill
  • Atlantic Pirates

    This seminar explores piracy in the Atlantic from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries. We will examine everyday life on pirate vessels; the pirates' role in emerging colonial societies and economies; the complex links between piracy, imperialism, and nation-building; and the image of pirates as both villains and figures of legend. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS P
    HIST 0535A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Popular Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean

    From tango to plastic surgery, Donald Duck to reggaeton, this course places popular culture at the center of modern Latin American and Caribbean history. How, we will ask, did popular culture reflect and shape struggles over national belonging? How did foreign cultural products come to bear on international relations and transnational flows? In what contexts has culture served as a vehicle of resistance to dominant ideologies and systems of power? Far from a mere "diversion," popular culture instead offers a compelling lens onto the relationship between state and society in Latin America and beyond. WRIT FYS
    HIST 0537A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • Women in the Middle East, 7th-20th C.: Patriarchal Visions, Revolutionary Voices

    This course provides an historical approach to women’s lives, status, and perceptions. It focuses on women in the Middle East, from the seventh century emergence of Islam to the twentieth century revolutions and struggle for new identities. It examines the contested roles of women in society and the ways women were culturally crafted. In particular, we will discuss the modes by which women’s lives were narrated (by themselves and others); women’s use of the “patriarchal bargain” to deal with the shift from so-called “traditional” to so-called “modern” culture; and the encounter between “Eastern” and “Western” societies. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0540F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
  • Abraham Lincoln: Historical and Cultural Perspectives

    This seminar uses life, legacy, myth of Abraham Lincoln to explore central themes such as frontier in early republic, nature of political leadership, law/legal culture, and emergence of sectionalism, slavery, antislavery, Civil War. Frequent short writing assignments and research investigations allow students in-depth explorations of Lincoln’s works, the writings of his contemporaries, and modern non-fiction, fiction, and film. The course enables us to consider two larger themes: 1) the relationship between memory and history; and 2) the function of history in modern society. The course has no prerequisites and does not presuppose special knowledge of American history. WRIT FYS
    HIST 0551A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Sport in American History

    This course covers the relationship of sports to aspects of American culture since 1900. Topics include gender, race, amateurism, professionalism, intercollegiate athletics, and sports heroes. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0556A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • The Age of Revolutions, 1760-1824

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, the Americas belonged to a handful of European monarchies; within a few decades, most of the Americas was composed of independent republics, some of the European monarchs were either deposed or quaking on their thrones. Usually considered separately, revolutions in British North America, France, Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and Spanish America had diverse local circumstances yet composed a single cycle of intellectual ferment, imperial reform, accelerating violence and, forging of new political communities. We will examine revolutions that helped create the world we live in. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0580M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Animal Histories

    Animals have been people’s energy, food, wealth, gods, hobbies, icons, and companions. Wild and domesticated non-human animals are essential yet often invisible historical subjects. This seminar makes them visible by tracking them through time—ancient, modern, and contemporary—on every continent. They are often symbols, but we look beyond animals as represented by people. We are more interested in them as actors and subjects with agency. By pushing at the boundaries of what constitutes legitimate topics, this seminar serves as a critical introduction to the historical discipline. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0582A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Walden + Woodstock: The American Lives of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bob Dylan

    Emerson and Dylan are cultural icons of 19th and 120th Century America. Both are elusive and yet representative writers who pushed against the limits of tradition genres, and, by doing so, created new ones: both gave support to turning points in the civil rights struggle and against American military aggression; both were at the epicenter of a wide circle of intellectuals, while denying their own centrality; both had boundless energy for innovative public performance. "Walden and Woodstock" is an investigation of the role of the intellectual within celebrity culture and of the use of comparative biography. SOPH
    HIST 0658D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • The Social Lives of Dead Bodies in China and Beyond

    Corpses, much like the living, are not neutral bodies, but are managed into structures of social meaning. This course aims to uncover corpses as signifiers and actors during times of community upheaval. We will take modern China as our focal point, but also look elsewhere in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia since the 19th century, when the broadening scale and nature of warfare; state expansion; rapid urban and rural development; global circulations of technology; and the interplay of international philanthropies with older forms of charity and ritual pacification significantly affected the treatment, conceptions, and actions of the dead. WRIT SOPH
    HIST 0685A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Difficult Relations? Judaism and Christianity from the Middle Ages until the Present (JUDS 0050M)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 0050M (CRN 15077).
  • The Campus on Fire: American Colleges and Universities in the 1960's (EDUC 0400)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0400 (CRN 14625).
  • Southern African History

    This course examines major themes of history of southern Africa from the earliest times until 1994, with heavy emphasis on historiographical debates. Our discussions of the South African past will always be informed by a consideration of the approach of the scholars who have interpreted and presented it as history. Our major questions concern the origins of historical change and the creation of racial groups. We will probe the significance of race in South African history but also the limitations of its explanatory power. Course will meet twice a week for lecture and discussion groups will meet once a week.
    HIST 1030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period

    Examines the cultural traditions of the urban samurai, the wealthy merchant, and the plebian artisan that emerged in the great metropolises of Edo, Osaka, and Kyoto during the early modern period. Focuses on the efforts of the government to mold certain kinds of cultural development for its own purposes and the efforts of various social groups to redirect those efforts to suit their desires and self-interest. WRIT P
    HIST 1140 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Japan's Pacific War: 1937-1945

    Uses film, oral histories, historical fiction, and more traditional forms of historical interpretation to explore the events, ideas, and legacies of Japan's Pacific War. The armed conflict began in 1937 with the Japanese invasion of China and ended in 1945 with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Some attention is paid to military developments, but the principle concerns fall into the areas of mutual images, mobilization, and memory. WRIT
    HIST 1155 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • The Long Fall of the Roman Empire

    Once thought of as the "Dark Ages," this period of western European history should instead be seen as a fascinating time in which late Roman culture fused with that of the Germanic tribes, a mixture tempered by a new religion, Christianity. Issues of particular concern include the symbolic construction of political authority, the role of religion, the nature of social loyalties, and gender roles. P
    HIST 1205 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • European Intellectual History: Discovering the Modern

    A lecture course, primarily for juniors and seniors, that focuses on salient philosophic, artistic, and ideological currents of 19th-century Europe. Beginning with the crisis of political and cultural legitimacy posed by the French Revolution, it concludes with the consolidation of bourgeois culture in the 1860s and 1870s and the two great scientific systematizers of these decades: Darwin and Marx. WRIT
    HIST 1230A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Modern European Women + Gender History

    This course deals with the history of European women and gender from the Enlightenment to the present. It will focus on large historical themes and questions, especially shifting constructions of femininity and masculinity. It will begin with an analysis of eighteenth-century philosophies regarding women and gender, and it will move to examinations of specific topics such as industrialization, Victorian femininity, the suffrage movements, gender and the Great War, interwar sexuality, fascism, gender and the Second World War, and the sexual revolution.
    HIST 1235A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • English History, 1529-1660

    Examines politics, religion, and society from the Protestant Reformation to the Puritan Revolution-a period of rapid and dramatic change when the world, for most English people, was turned upside down. Considers the experiences and concerns of ordinary men and women, as well as the elite. Takes in Scotland, Ireland, and the great migration to New England. P
    HIST 1266C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • Russia in the Era of Reforms, Revolutions, and World Wars

    This course examines the rapid industrialization, modernization, and urbanization of Russia from the era of the "Great Reforms" (1860s) through the Second World War. We will examine both the growing discontentment among the population with autocracy's efforts to maintain power and the Bolshevik effort to recreate the economy, society, and everyday life. Topics will include Russian Marxism and socialism, terrorism, the Russian revolutions of 1917, the rise and consolidation of Soviet socialism, famine, the red terror, and World War II. WRIT
    HIST 1268B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History of Brazil

    This course charts the history of Brazil from Portuguese contact with the indigenous population in 1500 to the present. It examines the countrys political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural development to understand the causes, interactions, and consequences of conflict, change, and continuity within Brazilian society. WRIT
    HIST 1310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Rebel Island: Cuba, 1492-Present

    Cuba, once the jewel in the Spanish imperial crown, has been home to some of the world's most radical revolutions and violent retrenchments. For two centuries, its influence has spread well beyond its borders, igniting the passion of nationalists and internationalists as well as the wrath of imperial aggression. This course traces the history of Cuba from its colonial origins through the present, foregrounding the revolutionary imaginary that has sustained popular action-from anti-slavery rebellions through the Cuban Revolution and its discontents-in addition to the historical processes that have forged one of the world's mot vibrant socio-cultural traditions.
    HIST 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • The Mexican Revolution

    An in-depth study of the Mexican Revolution. The focus is on the years of revolutionary violence (1910-1920), but considerable attention is also paid to the roots of the Revolution and to its socioeconomic and political impact in the period 1920-1940.
    HIST 1333 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Latin American History and Film: Memory, Narrative and Nation

    This course provides an introduction to cinematic interpretations of Latin American history. Together we will explore how (and why) filmmakers have used motion pictures to tell particular narratives about the Latin American past. We will critically examine a broad range of films dealing with historical questions, and explore what these films have to say about how gender and sexuality, imperialism, slavery, the church, revolution and repression shaped the history of the region. In order to explore these topics we will examine films in relation to academic, autobiographical, and popular texts, all of which provide different ways of representing the past.
    HIST 1381 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Modern Turkey: Empire, Nation, Republic

    One’s of world’s most populous Muslim majority countries today, Turkey is a member of NATO and candidate for European Union. Many see Turkey as a bridge between Europe and Asia. The founders of modern Turkey were former military officers, bureaucrats and intellectuals of the Ottoman Empire that spanned three continents lasting over six centuries. Mapping the political, socio-economic and cultural landscape since the late 19th century, this course examines the formation of modern Turkey until present day. We'll particularly explore secularism, Islam, sexuality, Kurdish question, recent political protests, memory, and arts and music. The course will consist of lectures and discussions.
    HIST 1460 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kadercan
  • Making America Modern

    This course surveys a crucial period in American history between the end of Reconstruction and the beginning of World War I. During this time, the United States transitioned from a relatively fragmented, traditional, and largely agricultural society into one that was remarkably diverse, increasingly urban, and highly industrialized. In surveying this important transitional period, we will pay particular attention to far-reaching changes in the nation's business and economic life, its social movements, as well as its cultural developments, all with an eye to understanding how the United States became one of the world's most commanding economic, political, and cultural powers.
    HIST 1505 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Searcy
  • Sinners, Saints, and Heretics: Religion in Early America

    This course considers the major people, events, and issues in the history of religion in North America, from pre-contact Native cosmologies to the tumultuous events of the Civil War. Attention will be given to "religion as lived" by ordinary people, as well as to the ways that religion shaped (or not) larger cultural issues such as immigration, public policy, social reform, warfare, democracy, slavery, and women's rights. Prior knowledge of religion in North America is not required; there are no prerequisites to this course, and it is open to all students. P WRIT
    HIST 1511 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • Political Movements in Twentieth-Century America

    Political movements in the United States in the twentieth century. History and theory. Highlights of the course include: populism, progressivism, segregationism, first wave feminism, labor movement, civil rights, new left, second wave feminism, new right. The course focuses on the origins, nature, ideologies, and outcomes of major political movements on both left and right in the twentieth century United States. WRIT
    HIST 1531 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • American Urban History, 1870-1965

    A survey with a specialized focus exploring American history from an urban frame of reference. Topics include the social consequences of the modern city, politics, reform, and federal-city relations. WRIT
    HIST 1551 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Empires in America to 1890

    This course surveys the development of American foreign relations from initial encounters between Native Americans and newly arrived Europeans to the extension of EuroAmerican power beyond the continental United States. By being attentive to a wider global context, we will attempt to understand the trajectory of "America" from a colonial hinterland to dominant world power. DPLL WRIT
    HIST 1553 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rosenberg
  • Science at the Crossroads

    This course will look closely at the dramatic developments that fundamentally challenged Western Science between 1859 and the advent of the Second World War in the 1930s. Its primary focus will be on a variety of texts written in an effort to understand and interpret the meanings of fundamentally new ideas including from the biological side--evolutionary theory, genetic theory, and eugenics; from the physical side relativity theory, and quantum mechanics. The class should be equally accessible to students whose primary interests lie in the sciences and those who are working in the humanities. WRIT
    HIST 1825M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • American Higher Education in Historical Context (EDUC 1730)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1730 (CRN 14626).
  • The History of American Education (EDUC 1020)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1020 (CRN 14643).
  • History of the State of Israel: 1948 to the Present (JUDS 1711)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1711 (CRN 14680).
  • History of Greece from Archaic Times to the Death of Alexander (CLAS 1210)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 1210 (CRN 16175).
  • Cities and Urban Culture in China

    Treats the development of cities and urban culture in China from roughly the sixteenth century (the beginning of a great urban boom) to the present. We will look at the physical layout of cities, city government and social structure, and urban economic life, often from a comparative perspective. The course focuses, however, on the changing culture of city life, tracing the evolution of a vernacular popular culture from the late imperial period, through the rise of Shanghai commercial culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to the diverse regional urban cultures of contemporary China.
    HIST 1961B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • North Korea: Past, Present, Future

    Typically, the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) is portrayed as a rogue nation ruled by the Kim family, autocrats who are either “mad” or “bad” and whose policies have traumatized the country’s citizens, wrecked the economy, and threatened nuclear disaster on South Korea, East Asia, even the USA. This course moves beyond such stereotypes to examine the interconnected political, economic, and cultural transformations of the DPRK from 1945 to the present. Also included are the lived experiences of the Korean people, the plight of refugees, and the question of unification with South Korea.
    HIST 1961I S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Sex, Power, and God: A Medieval Perspective

    Cross-dressing knights, virgin saints, homophobic priests, and mystics who speak in the language of erotic desire are but some of the medieval people considered in this seminar. This course examines how conceptions of sin, sanctity, and sexuality in the High Middle Ages intersected with structures of power in this period. While the seminar primarily focuses on Christian culture, it also considers Muslim and Jewish experience. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT P
    HIST 1963Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • The Enchanted World: Magic, Angels, and Demons in Early Modern Europe

    European fascination with the unseen world reached its highpoint alongside the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution,and Enlightenment. Between 1500 and 1800, theologians, natural philosopher, princes, and peasants devoted enormous energy to understanding, communicating with, and eliminating a host of ethereal creatures, including ghosts, angels, demons, vampires, nature spirits, and witches. Some also sought to access the praeternatural powers that these creatures seemed to command. This course explores the intellectual, social, political, and religious origins of the interest in this unseen world, the structures Europeans created to grapple with it, as well as the factors that ultimately led to its demise. P
    HIST 1964B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Women in Early Modern England

    Selected topics in the social history of early modern England (c.1500-1800), with particular emphasis on the experiences of women. Themes to be addressed will include the family, working life, education, crime, politics, religion, and the early feminists. Not open to freshmen sophomores. P
    HIST 1964D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • "Furies from Hell" to "Femi-Nazis": A History of Modern Anti-Feminism

    Women have faced a deep antipathy at nearly every turn in their struggles for civic and social inclusion. These denials of women’s rights often take the form of commentaries—sometimes vicious ones—about women’s general natures, bodies, and fitness for public life. Women are consistently tagged with various labels of otherness: opponents of women’s rights deem them irrational, unnatural, traitors to society, even sexual deviants. This course will examine the dangers that women allegedly represent to social stability from the Enlightenment to today, as well as how women have fought back to assert their rights and independence.
    HIST 1965N S02
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Gender and Sexuality in the Modern History of Latin America

    This seminar explores how gender shaped the political and social history of 19th and 20th century Latin America. Together, we will explore some themes at the center of this growing body of scholarship, such as the role of honor and sexual morality in shaping post-independence Latin American societies, the efforts of states to regulate the family, and the role of gender in the organization of the modern labor force. Throughout the semester, we will discuss the intersections of race, gender and class that are at the heart of changing conceptions of sexual morality and ideals of modern family organization.
    HIST 1967Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Approaches to The Middle East

    This seminar introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Middle East Studies in the broader context of the history of area studies in the humanities and social sciences. Why and when did the Middle East become an area of study? What are the approaches and topics that have shaped the development of this field? And what are the political implications of contending visions for its future? The readings sample canonical and alternative works and the classes feature visits by leading scholars who research and write on this region. WRIT
    HIST 1968 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples I

    This advanced undergraduate seminar seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the links between the region now known as Israel and Palestine and the peoples that have inhabited it or have made it into part of their mental, mythical. and religious landscape throughout history. The course will be interdisciplinary at its very core, engaging the perspectives of historians, geologists, geographers, sociologists, scholars of religion and the arts, politics and media. At the very heart of the seminar is the question: What makes for the bond between groups and place - real or imagined, tangible or ephemeral. No prerequisites required.
    HIST 1969A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Problem of Class in Early America

    This seminar considers economic inequality in colonial British North America and the new United States. Studying everyone from sailors, servants, and slaves in the seventeenth century to industrial capitalists and slaveholders in the nineteenth century, this course will look at the changing material structures of economic inequality and the shifting arguments that legitimated or challenged that inequality. Readings will explore how historians have approached the subject of inequality using on class as a mode of analysis. Students will write extended papers that place primary research in conversation with relevant historiography. Enrollment limited to: 20. Written permission required. WRIT
    HIST 1970D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • The Nuclear Age

    This is a course for students interested in questions about the development of atomic weapons, their use on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Cold War arms race that followed, and debates over the risks associated with other nuclear technologies. We will look carefully at the scientific and military imperatives behind the Manhattan Project, the decisions that led to the use of atomic weapons on Japan, and subsequent efforts to reflect on the consequences of those choices. We will also explore how popular protest and popular culture after 1945 shaped our understanding of the terrors and promise of the nuclear age. WRIT
    HIST 1974S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Fueling Change: A Global History of Energy

    The transition from an energy regime based on biomass and animal muscle to another based on fossil fuels is an epochal transformation whose importance is on a par with the Neolithic transition from hunter-gathering to agriculture. For most of their history, human societies relied on the sun’s energy locked up in plants and animals for their livelihood. In the late eighteenth century, some societies began to transcend the limits of the established energy regime. This course examines the implications of the modern energy transition from the old energy regime to a new one based on fossil fuels around the world.
    HIST 1976F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vergara
  • Art and Politics

    This seminar will examine how power and culture give meaning to objects as well as how objects become subjects of history. This seminar will work closely with the RISD Museum and students in the seminar will select objects from the museum's collection to historically and creatively examine different ways of seeing and narrating, combining theory with hands-on exploration of how objects make their way to museum collections and acquire the status of "art."
    HIST 1976S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • History of Life Itself: Biopolitics in Modern Europe

    Life has long existed, but also has a history of its own. With the development of the natural sciences and state governance of its own populations, human life can be said to have entered into history. Homo Sapiens became the subject of medical science, political philosophy, and state law. In looking at the intersecting histories of science, politics, and theories of life, this seminar will examine the origins and effects of political economy, biology, public health, racism, eugenics, state violence, and ultimately democracy. We will read meta-histories from theorists, case studies from historians, and classic works of political philosophy.
    HIST 1979S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gentry
  • Debates on the Holocaust

    Few topics in Modern European History have so heavily engaged historians while producing so little consensus as the Holocaust. Several debates have emerged in scholarship around several major issues such as motivation, collaboration, ideology, as well as larger questions around genocide itself. In this course, we will examine each debate and the links to specific methods within history such as periodization, causality and disciplinary boundaries. This course presents a unique entry to gain exposure to foundational historical categories and methods. Students will gain a knowledge of concepts critical to historical debate and foundation in a variety of approaches to history.
    HIST 1979W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gentry
  • Modern Enchantments: Science, Religion, and Magic in Modernizinig America

    Scholars have long equated modernity with “disenchantment,” the subordination of magic and mysticism to the forces of science and secularization. Recent scholarship, however, has challenged this view, suggesting that the persistence of magical worldviews has been integral to the development of modernity itself. In this course, we will explore the various interactions, both conflicting and complementary, between science, religion, and magic in the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century United States. Topics will include spiritualism, hypnosis, phrenology, optical illusions, alternative medicines, stage magic, and the early psychology of religion. Throughout, we will interrogate the concept of modernity and the narrative of disenchantment.
    HIST 1979X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Searcy
  • The World in Revolution: America and the Global South during the Long 1970s

    We'll explore varied relationships between Americans and Global South during the long 1970s—from the wave of revolutionary movements of the late 1960s to the Reagan “offensive” of 1981. As we trace these relationships across the decade, students will learn how Americans from all walks of life encountered the revolutionary “Third World.” While many on the American Left—from Black Nationalists to feminists such as Bella Abzug—sought cooperation with the revolutionary movements in the Global South, others became determined to reassert U.S. hegemony abroad following the Vietnam War. We will try to understand why this latter group’s antagonistic attitude towards the Global South ultimately came to define U.S. foreign policy.
    HIST 1979Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rosenberg
  • Jews and Revolutions (JUDS 1701)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1701 (CRN 15652).
  • Advanced Topics in Landscape History (HMAN 1971P)

    Interested students must register for HMAN 1971P (CRN 16609).
  • Comparative History of Abolitionism in the Atlantic World (POBS 1694)

    Interested students must register for POBS 1694 (CRN 17054).
  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Watson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history, allowing students to refine research skills, define a project, prepare a thesis prospectus, required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Colloquium

    Required of all first-year graduate students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Historical Crossings: Empires and Modernity

    “Historical crossings” is a rough translation of histoire croisée, referring to global configurations of events and a shared history, rather than to a traditional comparative history. This Seminar is designed to be the cornerstone of the M.A. program. It will not serve as a traditional historical methods course but instead focus on training students to read and think on various scales of historical analysis—from cross-cultural and trans-geographic to the granularity of social and cultural specificity, requiring students to think both globally and locally and introducing them to an advanced level of historical inquiry, debate, and exploration.
    HIST 2935 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Writing Workshop

    Required of all 3rd semester Ph.D. students.
    HIST 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Early Modern Continental Europe - Reading

    This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some major topics and debates in early modern European history, as well as a range of geographical, methodological, and historiographical perspectives. Readings combine recent works and classics to give a sense both of where the field has been and where it is going. Topics covered include political history, religious interactions (among Christians and between Christians, Jews and Moslems), urban history, the history of the book, Atlantic history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. The class also provides the opportunity to explore a single topic of choice in greater depth.
    HIST 2970E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • American Political History

    This graduate seminar will explore a range of approaches to the study of America’s political past from the colonial period to the late twentieth century, including scholarship on electoral politics, the state, political culture, grassroots politics and resistance, the politics of gender and family, and American political development. We will analyze how scholars have defined and redefined the field over time and throughout we will interrogate the question, “what is political history?”
    HIST 2970H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Steffes
  • Graduate Readings in Early American History

    No description available.
    HIST 2970W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • Core Readings in Nineteenth Century Europe

    Provides an introduction to the central issues of nineteenth-century European history. It has two purposes: first, to help you refine your abilities to think historiographically; second, to assist you in preparing for your comprehensive exams. To that end, we will read both standard interpretations and newer scholarship.
    HIST 2970Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Latin American Historiography

    This course examines the development of historical writings on Latin America produced in the United States from the late nineteenth century until the present. We will focus on themes, such as race, gender, labor, subaltern studies, dependency theory, postcolonial analysis, and post-modernism, to understand the diverse approaches to Latin American history. M
    HIST 2971E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep