Courses for Spring 2015

  • Ethics After Auschwitz?

    Can we still speak of a “human condition”—a moral term—when human beings are capable of genocide? Does ethical responsibility have meaning if another’s death can be manufactured by the state? Can traditional morality and religion still find a place in a world of which it cannot make sense? In this class, we will take the Holocaust as the beginning of a tragic account of contemporary humanity and examine the possibilities for human life and morality in light of the social and political orchestration of mass killing and oppression. Authors include, Adorno, Agamben, Arendt, Fackenheim, Foucault, Levi, and Levinas. SOPH DPLL WRIT LILE
    JUDS 0080A S02
    Primary Instructor
    Nahme
  • Elementary Hebrew

    This is the second half of a year-long course, an introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. Prerequisite: JUDS 0100. Students must have taken JUDS 0100 for credit to receive credit for this course. Exceptions must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: JUDS 0300 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    JUDS 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Issues in Contemporary Israeli Society, Politics, and Culture in Hebrew

    An exploration of current issues in contemporary Israeli society, politics, and culture: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, tensions between ultra-orthodox and secular Jews, religion and state, Israel as a Jewish and democratic state, the economic gap between rich and poor, the integration of citizens from a variety of backgrounds (Jews of Middle Eastern, North African, Russian, and Ethiopian origin; Arab citizens of Israel), gender relations. Sources include films, television programs, Internet news, works of literature. Conducted in Hebrew. Emphasizes strengthening Hebrew reading, writing, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: JUDS 0500. Students who have not taken JUDS 0500 should see instructor for permission to enroll.
    JUDS 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
  • How Bible Became Holy (RELS 0325)

    Interested students must register for RELS 0325 (CRN 24321).
  • A Game of Thrones: Religion and Nationalism, 1789-1933

    While contemporary liberal democracy takes a neutral stance toward different religions, it was modern European conflict over religion that gave rise to this political theory. Supposed “friends” such as 19th-century German Protestants and Catholics fought bitterly about whose version of Christianity should be the basis of the modern state. “Enemies” such as the Jews were thought to be incapable of civic participation in the liberal state and undeserving of equal rights. This course will examine, both philosophically and historically, the tensions between religion and politics in modernity that led to the emergence of the theory of state neutrality. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 0700 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nahme
  • Brothers Betrayed: Jews and Poles from 1500 until Today

    Jews have lived on Polish lands for some nine hundred years. In that time, they and their non-Jewish neighbors have interacted in a wide range of ways, from friendship and co-operation to hatred and violence. In this course, we examine this centuries long relationship, focusing particularly on how peaceful co-existence between Poles and Jews could rapidly change to bitter hostility. Topics include: Jews and the early-modern nobility; the nineteenth-century “Polish-Jewish Brotherhood”; the exclusionary politics of the interwar Polish republic; Poland’s role in the Holocaust; the post-war Communist regime and the Jews; Polish-Jewish relations following the collapse of communism. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 0901 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Adam and Eve in Early Jewish and Christian Interpretation

    In antiquity, the biblical story of Adam and Eve generated an enormous volume of commentary. Early Jews and Christians saw in this story profound lessons about the nature of humanity, God, and the world. We will examine how, in antiquity, both religious groups interpreted this relatively short story. We will also pay close attention to the different ways that both Jews and Christians developed to interpret these texts. Genres such as allegory, inspired interpretation (pesher), midrash, and the letters of the New Testament will be covered. WRIT DPLL
    JUDS 1612 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • The Archaeology of Palestine

    Palestine constitutes one of the most important archaeological regions connected to the origins of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. In this class we will examine the material remains of the region beginning in pre-historic times until the end of the Ottoman period in 1917. Literary sources as well as the more recent scholarly debates and discoveries help us understand the material remains of the relevant periods. WRIT
    JUDS 1615 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Galor
  • Bibical History: What Really Happened?

    Topics of recent and current debate among specialists in the field of Israelite history. Problems include (1) the historicity of the patriarchs and matriarchs; (2) the historical evidence relevant to the question of an exodus; (3) the nature of Israel's settlement in Canaan; (4) the 10th century, era of empire or literary fiction? (5) the land of Judah after the Babylonian conquest. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 1635 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture and Language

    Yiddish was the language spoken by most Jews in Eastern Europe and the countries to which they emigrated (including the U.S., England, South Africa, South American countries, and Israel) from the nineteenth century until after the Holocaust. It was the basis for a transnational Jewish culture and literature, and it played a central role in modern Jewish political life. We will explore the history of Yiddish culture and the development of the Yiddish press, literature, and cinema. The connection between Yiddish and modern Jewish politics will also be discussed. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to develop a basic knowledge of the Yiddish language. DPLL
    JUDS 1713 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • Modernity, Jews, and Urban Identities in Central Europe

    The course will explore the distinct cultural identities that Jewish modernist intellectuals like Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Sigmund Freud, Franz Kafka and Karl Kraus forged for themselves in response to the conflicting challenges of assimilation, anti-semitism and modernization. Readings will be based on primary sources and special emphasis will be placed on the historical contexts of Berlin, Vienna, Budapest and Prague where these thinkers lived their lives. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 1718 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • A Commonwealth of Many Nations? Early Modern Poland-Lithuania (HIST 1551)

    Interested students must register for HIST 1551 (CRN 25818).
  • Zionists Anti Zionists and Post Zionists: Jewish Controversies in the 20th Century

    In Jewish historical memory, Zionism is seen as the dominant Jewish national ideology throughout the 20th century. However, emerging in 1897, the Zionist movement aroused significant Jewish opposition. Many different Jewish ideologies developed, ranging from non-Zionism to anti-Zionism. This course will discuss the different arguments used by both Zionists and their opponents. We will look at the various options: Zionism, Diaspora Nationalism, Socialism and Communism, and Reform Judaism (before 1967), as well as Israeli Zionism and the opposition it aroused from Post-Zionists. Our focal question will be: why did Zionism evoke so much opposition among different Jewish groups. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 1752 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brink-Danan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Kraemer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Yiddish for Research

    This is a course in Yiddish reading for research purposes designed primarily for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. This means that the emphasis will be on learning how to read and decipher a range of texts in modern Yiddish in different genres written. We will read the Yiddish classics and discuss their language, style and content, as well as newspaper articles published at the beginning of the 20th century and various historical documents. We will learn to read and understand non-standard pre-1930s Yiddish as well as American and Soviet Yiddish. Participation in this course requires the instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to 40.
    JUDS 2040 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski