Resources for CLS Members

The Office of the Dean of the College awards a small number of grants to faculty who are developing new courses, renovating existing ones, or simply attempting to add a special element to a particular class. All regular members of the Brown faculty are eligible to apply. We particularly encourage applications from faculty who are developing new first-year seminars.

Research Funds and Application Guidelines

Information on research funding eligibility and opportunities from the Vice-President for Research.

Curriculum Development Grants

The Dean's Office will offer up to $4000 to help cover the cost of new course materials and other research expenses. Funds are made available to faculty during the summer, for work on a course that will be taught in the following academic year. Awards can also be taken as summer salary.

To apply, fill out the online application(s) and, if you are creating a new course, send in a CCC course proposal form to James Valles, Associate Dean of the College for Curriculum. Your online application will include:

  • Description of project (one page) Include information about the kind of course you are proposing to develop; your pedagogical approach; whether this is an old or a new course; and how the revised curriculum will enhance your department's and the university's offerings.
  • Letter of endorsement from the chair of your department or unit.
  • Detailed budget. If you plan to use the award for course materials or other research expenses, indicate clearly how you will spend the funds. If you plan to take the award as summer salary, please indicate this, as well. Note that if an award taken as salary it will be subject to taxes at the normal rate. For more information contact James Valles, Associate Dean of the College for Curriculum.

Salomon Grants

The DOC also awards smaller grants ($200 - $500) to faculty members who are making plans to enhance a classroom experience in some way: by taking the class on a field trip, or inviting a guest lecturer, or purchasing additional materials for class use. Faculty members interested in applying for a Salomon grant should click the link on the right for the online application. Salomon grants are awarded on a rolling deadline. N.B.: Because these grants are small, we expect that your department will initially handle the reimbursement of your expenses. After your class activity has been completed, the Dean of the College will then credit your department’s account. For more information, contact James Valles, Associate Dean of the College for Curriculum.

Course Development Grants (Wayland Collegium)

Course Development grants support interdisciplinary teaching and innovative approaches to active and collaborative learning. The following extra-departmental, collaborative, or single-department course directions are meant to be suggestive rather than exclusive.

  • Courses focusing on fundamental themes of human life or problems of society, and on collaborative approaches to them by several disciplines or ways of thinking not found in existing disciplines.
  • Courses considering various relationships among different modes of thought and exploring the possibilities of integrative treatment of these diverse ways of thinking.
  • Innovations in teaching that promote active learning by students individually or in groups.

Grants of up to $2,500 may be used for expenses such as student assistance, research, travel, books, laboratory equipment, computer software preparation (note: not to include computer purchase/ hardware). A brief report is required at the end of the academic year.

Proposals for Course Development grants should include:

  • Projected syllabus
  • Brief bibliography
  • Course title and brief description
  • Names of faculty participants
  • Budget description with major spending categories
  • Objectives, subject, teaching strategies
  • Reasons why the Wayland Collegium is an appropriate funding source

Study Group Grants

Wayland Collegium faculty study groups provide a format for interdisciplinary study which explores a new area of investigation. Study groups are often the first stage of a two-year process which culminates in the development of a faculty seminar for which a second round of funding is possible. Study Groups are designed to enable faculty to pursue a subject of common interest, to meet on a regular basis, to exchange views, papers, and research methods, and to make presentations of their own material. Recipients may wish to invite off-campus visitors or participants, or to retain graduate or undergraduate students as research assistants. The Study Group grant may be used to prepare for a research project, a joint publication, or a new course.

Proposals should be clear and succinct, providing the following information:

  • a description of the subject of study
  • approaches anticipated
  • a full list of participants
  • a justification of the funds requested and an itemized budget
  • why the topic is of theoretical and educational importance
  • how the proposal will impact on future teaching and/or scholarly interactions at Brown
  • preliminary work that has already taken place, e.g., interactions among members of the group, evidence of contacts with other interested parties at Brown
  • where applicable, duties of research assistants (graduate or undergraduate)
  • description of participating personnel (faculty, speakers, student assistants)
  • time frame for carrying out proposal

Study groups may receive up to $5,000. A report is required at the beginning of Semester II, stating activity to date and state of budget to date. A final report should be submitted at the end of the academic year including possible outcomes of the grant, such as new courses, books, or conferences.

Seminar Grants

A Faculty Seminar grant provides an opportunity for faculty members to collaborate in a year-long exploration or research venture that can promote personal and intellectual growth while contributing to the advancement of learning on a topic that is of broad human significance and that transcends disciplinary boundaries. A seminar may result in publication and should also encourage the development of new curricular ideas that might become future courses. There are a number of ways to organize a Faculty Seminar. For example, a group of faculty might seek the help of outside consultants to provide them with reading and to speak and lead discussions. Or a group might organize a mini-symposium or a series of smaller panel discussions spread throughout the year. The Collegium will grant up to $15,000 for the Seminar. The award can be used to support summer activities necessary to the seminar's organization, for honoraria and travel for visiting lecturers, to cover a research assistant's expenses, and for other research-related activities.

Proposals should provide the following information:

  • a description of the topic and its significance;
  • names of potential faculty participants;
  • a plan of the Seminar and the general direction it would take in exploration of the topic;
  • a proposed budget and budget justification (including other potential sources of funding);
  • why the topic is of theoretical and educational importance;
  • how the proposal will impact on future teaching and/or scholarly interactions at Brown;
  • preliminary work that has already taken place, e.g., interactions among members of the group, evidence of contacts with other interested parties at Brown, provisional list of invited speakers and format for invited lecturers;
  • where applicable, duties of research assistants (graduate or undergraduate);
  • description of participating personnel (faculty, speakers, student assistants);
  • time frame for carrying out proposal

Criteria: The proposals will be evaluated by the Executive Committee using the following criteria:

  1. Does the proposed Seminar topic address significant issues of human life?
  2. Is the Seminar likely to lead to new integrative studies and a multidisciplinary approach to the topic?
  3. Will it lead to and likely contribute to new courses or have an impact on educational programs of the University?
  4. Will it encourage a collaborative association among faculty members?

A minimum of five participants is necessary for an interdisciplinary Seminar. A report is required at the beginning of Semester II describing activities and state of budget to date. A final report should be submitted at the end of the academic year, including possible outcomes of the grant, such as new courses, books, conferences.

Departmental Research Funds for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

These funds support faculty research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, where external funding opportunities are limited. OVPR provides funds to departments in these fields, and department chairs are responsible for soliciting brief written proposals from interested faculty, managing a merit-based review process, and awarding funds to applicants. Eligible expenses include, but are not limited to, travel to research conferences or archives, preparation of manuscripts and articles, and securing permissions. The Vice President for Research will distribute departmental allocations of $1000 per full-time faculty member. Because this is to be a merit-based process, we anticipate that the awarded amounts may be greater or lesser than $1000, depending on the scope and merit of the proposed project. The awarded amount may not exceed $2000 per faculty member. All expenditures under this program must be in accordance with University policies and procedures.

Eligibility

A professor at any rank or any senior lecturer active in research is eligible. Faculty members who hold named chairs are eligible to receive these funds, but adjunct, emeritus, and visiting faculty are not.

Brown Instructional Technology (BIT) Grants

The Brown Instructional Technology (BIT) Grants Program is an opportunity for faculty and graduate instructors to have digital projects created for their courses. Project proposals should state specific pedagogical goals and explain how the use of technology might enhance the teaching and learning experience. Projects will be developed by the Students Technology Assistant Program, and coordinated by the Instructional Technology Group in collaboration with the instructor(s) and any graduate or undergraduate student researchers. Work will take place during the summer and could extend to the following academic year.

Types of Projects

  • Computer Animations
  • Custom Websites
  • Digital Video Production
  • MyCourses Course Websites - Designer Help

    In addition to these specific areas, you can request help for slide, audio and video digitization. Proposals clearly stating the dimensions and use of the digitized materials will be accepted on a first come first serve basis. Support is also available to help you work on digital presentations (PowerPoint, Keynote) including images, video clips and animations.

  • Attend meetings and participate in communications to make sure their projects are planned for, properly executed and completed in a timely manner.
  • Complete their work within one year of receiving their grant.
  • Present their work at a showcase organized by the Instructional Technology Group.

BIT grant recipients agree to:

  • Attend meetings and participate in communications to make sure their projects are planned for, properly executed and completed in a timely manner.
  • Complete their work within one year of receiving their grant.
  • Present their work at a showcase organized by the Instructional Technology Group.

    Specific inquiries can be addressed directly to your instructional technologist and to Giovanna Roz, ITG Projects Coordinator. The Instructional Technology Group email: itg@brown.edu

    External Funding Sources

    Information about External Funding Sources.

    Travel Funds

    Voting Brown faculty members are eligible for travel funds through the Faculty Travel Fund.

    Travel funding from International Affairs for travel to international conferences, supplements monies from the Faculty Travel Fund, above.

    Center for Language Studies Supplemental Travel Funds

    CLS members are eligible for travel support under a separate travel fund administered by CLS. First of all, this limited fund supports University travel for academic staff in CLS who are not eligible for travel support from any other source. CLS faculty and affiliated faculty members from language departments are asked to first seek travel funding from the Faculty Travel Fund and their home department before seeking support from the CLS travel budget. Requests from these individuals are considered one at a time, with the guiding principles being that the funds are allotted as fairly and evenly as possible (e.g., if a person receives substantial support one year, he or she will generally not receive support the following year). Consideration is based on when the person last received CLS travel support, whether or not the person is giving a presentation at a meeting or is simply attending, etc.