JCB Research Fellows 2015-2016

A list of current fellows, institutional affiliations, titles of project, names of awards, and duration (in parentheses).

Long-term (5 to 10 months)

Alyce de Carteret, Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, Brown University, “Classic Maya Homemakers: The Craft of Non-Elite Domestic Architecture at the Site of El Zotz, Guatemala"
J.M. Stuart Fellow
(9)

Alcira Dueñas, Associate Professor of Latin American History, Ohio State University, Newark, “Converting Indigenous Andeans into Legal Subjects: Pueblos de Indios and Andean Cabildos in the Making of Empire”
Donald L. Saunders Fellow
(9)

Mark Lentz, Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, Utah Valley University, “Bridging the Gap: Interpreters in Colonial Yucatan, 1519-1821”
R. David Parsons Fellow (7)

Rachel O'Toole, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Irvine, “Uncertain Freedom: Africans beyond the Laws of Slavery in 17th-Century Peru”
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow
(9)

Cristobal Silva, Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, “Republic of Medicine”
Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow
(9)

Dan A. Zborover, Visiting Scholar and Lecturer, Center for U.S. - Mexican Studies, University of California, San Diego, “Written in the Land: The Historical Archaeology of Indigenous Territorial-Narratives in Southern Mexico”
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow
(9)

Minta Zlomke, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Brown University, “Hybridity and the Mixed State: Avatars of Displacement in English Renaissance Literature”
Interdisciplinary Opportunities for Sixth-Year Students in the Humanities & Social Sciences Fellow (9)

Short-term (2 to 4 months)

Graça Almeida Borges, Postdoctoral Fellow, Interdisciplinary Center for History, Culture and Societies, University of Évora, Portugal, “Empire and Human Rights: Colonization and Sovereignty in the Iberian Atlantic World”
Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow
(4)

Kenneth Banks, Associate Professor of History, Wofford College, “Rogue Merchant: The Atlantic World of Captain Thomas Allen”
Marie L. and William R. Hartland Fellow
(4)

Katherine Bonil Gómez, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Johns Hopkins University , “The Identities and Political Culture of Free People of African Descent in New Granada, 1760-1815”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow
(4)

Scott Cave, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Pennsylvania State University, “Cross-Cultural Communication in the Spanish Atlantic Frontier, 1470-1570”
Barbara S. Mosbacher Fellow
(4)

Carla Cevasco, Ph.D. Candidate in American Studies, Harvard University, “Feast, Fast, and Flesh: Hunger and Violence in Colonial New England and New France”
Charles H. Watts Memorial Fellow
(2)

Christine DeLucia, Assistant Professor of History, Mount Holyoke College, “The Itineraries: Seasons of History in the Native Northeast and Ezra Stiles’ New England”
John M. Monteiro Memorial Fellow
(2)

Rebecca Earle, Professor of History, University of Warwick, United Kingdom, “Potatoes, Health and Knowledge in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World”
Alice E. Adams Fellow
(3)

Christopher Evans, Professor of History, University of South Wales, Australia, “The Eighteenth-Century New England Whaling Industry”
Marie L. and William R. Hartland Fellow
(2)

Bronwen Everill, Lecturer in History, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, “African Trade and Ethical Consumption in the Atlantic World, 1760-1840”
Ruth and Lincoln Ekstrom Fellow
(2)

Emily C. Floyd, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History and Latin American Studies, Tulane University, “Matrices of Devotion: Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Limeñian Devotional Prints and Local Religion in the Viceroyalty of Peru”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow
(4)

Maria Inês Godinho Guarda, Postdoctoral Fellow in History, King's College London, United Kingdom, “The Coastal Middlemen and their Role in West and West Central Africa Slave Trade (1680-1720)”
Marie L. and William R. Hartland Fellow
(4)

Johnhenry Gonzalez, Assistant Professor of History, University of South Florida, “The Business Papers of Nicholas, James, and John Brown Regarding Colonial Saint Domingue and Early Haiti”
Barbara S. Mosbacher Fellow
(3)

Sean P. Harvey, Assistant Professor of History, Seton Hall University, “Native Views of Linguistic Relationships in Eastern North America from the 17th to the 19th Centuries”
Helen Watson Buckner Memorial Fellow
(2)

Gretchen E. Henderson, Lecturer in English, Georgetown University, and Affiliated Scholar in Art History, Kenyon College, "Crafting the Bonds: An Opera Libretto"
Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Fellow (2)

Nicole T. Hughes, Ph.D. Candidate in Latin American and Iberian Cultures and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, Columbia University, “A Theater of the Americas: Dramatic Creation and Historical Imagination, 1500-1640"
Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow
(4)

Mary D. Lewis, Professor of History, Harvard University, “The First French Decolonization: A New History of Nineteenth-Century Empire”
Jane L. Keddy Memorial Fellow
(2)

Nathan Marvin, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Johns Hopkins University, “The Bourbon Exception: Race and the French Indian Ocean Colonies in the Age of Atlantic Revolutions, 1767-1810”
Virginia and Jean R. Perrette Fellow
(2)

Adrian Masters, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Texas at Austin, “Empire of Petitioners: Creating the Legal Category of Mestizo in the 16th Century”
Maury A. Bromsen Memorial Fellow
(2)

Nathaniel Millett, Associate Professor of History, Saint Louis University, “Afro-Indian Relations in the Anglo-Atlantic World: c. 1550-1815”
Charles H. Watts Memorial Fellow
(2)

Tessa Murphy, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Chicago, “An Indigenous Archipelago: Caribs & Europeans in the Lesser Antilles, 1600-1700”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow
(2)

Hayley Negrin, Ph.D. Candidate in History, New York University, “Possessing Indian Women and Children: Slavery, Gender and the Creation of Native Racial Categories in the Early American South, 1607-1750”
Ruth and Lincoln Ekstrom Fellow
(4)

Anne Ruderman, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Yale University, “Supplying the Slave Trade: How Europeans Met African Demand for European Manufactured  Products, Commodities and Re-exports, 1670-1790”
Alexander O. Vietor Memorial Fellow
(4)

Margaret E. Schotte, Assistant Professor of History, York University, Canada, “From Cosmographical Guides to Merchant Handbooks: The Evolution of Navigation Manuals, 1509-1800”
Jeannette D. Black Memorial Fellow
(1)

Hugo Silva, Postdoctoral Fellow, CHAM-Centro de História d'Aquem e d'Alem Mar, Portugal, “The Configurations of the Catholic Church in the South Atlantic: Structures, Dynamics, and Power Relations (1750-1808)”
Almeida Family Fellow
(3)

Luís Filipe Silvério Lima, Assistant Professor of History, Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil, “A Transgeographical Look at the Worlds of Messianism and Prophetic Writings in the Early Modern World”
Honorary JCB Fellow
(5)

Jordan Smith, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Georgetown University, “The Invention of Rum”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (2)

Gregory Smithers, Associate Professor of History, Virginia Commonwealth University, “Cherokee Waters: A Native American Environmental History”
Charles H. Watts Memorial Fellow
(1.5)

Jessica Stair, Ph.D. Candidate in History of Art, University of California, Berkeley, “Indigenous Literacies and Systems of Remembrance in the Techialoyan Manuscripts of Seventeenth-Century New Spain”
José Amor Y Vázquez Fellow
(2)

Lindsay Van Tine, Ph.D. Candidate in English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University, “Translated Conquests: Archive, History, and Territory in Hemispheric Literatures, 1823-54”
John Alden Memorial Fellow
(2)

Shuichi Wanibuchi, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, “A Colony by Design: Nature, Knowledge, and the Transformation of Landscape in the Delaware Valley, 1680-1780”
Norman Fiering Fellow
(2)