Faculty Profile: Chad Gwaltney, PhD

Chad Gwaltney
Chad Gwaltney, PhD
Assistant Professor of Community Health (Research)
Community Health
Work: +1 401-863-6662
Dr. Gwaltney's work has focused on cognitive and emotional factors underlying cigarette smoking initiation, maintenance, and cessation. His research has featured Ecological Momentary Assessment, a method of data collection in which individuals use palm-top computers to report about their experiences as they are happening outside of the laboratory. He is currently conducting a NIDA-funded study of adolescent smoking cessation.

Biography

Dr. Gwaltney received his Ph.D. in Clinical-Health psychology from the University of Pittsburgh in 2002. He completed his clinical psychology internship at the Brown University School of Medicine and joined the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies as a postdoctoral fellow in 2002. He was appointed to the faculty in the Department of Community Health in 2004.

Institutions

BH-A

Research Description

Dr. Gwaltney received his Ph.D. in Clinical-Health psychology from the University of Pittsburgh in 2002. He completed his clinical psychology internship at the Brown University School of Medicine and joined the Center as a postdoctoral fellow in 2002. He was appointed to the faculty in 2004. Dr. Gwaltney's work has focused on cognitive and emotional factors underlying smoking initiation, maintenance, and cessation. He is currently the Principal Investigator of a NIDA-funded grant examining the process of cessation and relapse among adolescent smokers. In this study, adolescents self-monitor their experiences and behaviors in real-time using palm-top computers. Dr. Gwaltney also maintains an interest in the development of patient-reported outcome instruments for use in clinical trials. His most recent publications have focused on dynamic social-cognitive factors underlying relapse among adult smokers, the feasibility of using ecological momentary assessment methods with adolescents, and the equivalence of paper and electronic assessments.

Grants and Awards

NHLBI Predoctoral Fellowship in Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine,
University of Pittsburgh (1995-1999)

Brown University Internship Research Award (2002)

Research Excellence Award, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University (2003)

Affiliations

Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Association for Psychological Science
American Psychological Association

Funded Research

Ecological Momentary Assessment of Adolescent Smoking Cessation
NIDA
Role: Principal Investigator
Date received: 4/1/07
Total Costs: $1,125,000

Effect of Mood on Impulsivity Among Adolescent Smokers
NIDA
Role: Principal Investigator
Date received: 9/30/2004
Total costs: $426,250

Enhanced MI with Alcohol Positive Trauma Patients
NIAAA
Role: Co-Investigator
Date received: 5/10/2005
Total costs: $3,520,171

Biobehavioral Mechanisms of Topiramate and Drinking
NIAAA
Role: Co-Investigator
Date received: 1/1/2006
Total costs: $3,023,634

Mechanisms Linking Hostility and Smoking
NIDA
Role: Co-Investigator
Date received: 3/5/2006
Total costs: $423,500

Selected Publications

  • Gwaltney, C.J., Shiffman, S., & Sayette, M.A. (2005). Situational correlates of abstinence self-efficacy. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114, 649-660. (2005)
  • Gwaltney, C.J., Shiffman, S., Balabanis, M.H., & Paty, J.A. (2005). Dynamic self-efficacy and outcome expectancies: Prediction of smoking lapse and relapse. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114, 661-675. (2005)
  • Gwaltney, C.J., Shiffman, S., Paty, J.A., Liu, K. S., Kassel, J.D., Gnys, M., & Hickcox, M. (2002). Using self-efficacy judgments to predict characteristics of lapses to smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70 (5), 1140-1149. (2002)
  • Gwaltney, C.J., Shiffman, S., Norman, G.J., Paty, J.A., Kassel, J.D., Gnys, M., Hickcox, M., Waters, A., & Balabanis, M. (2001). Does smoking abstinence self-efficacy vary across situations? Identifying context-specificity within the Relapse Situation Efficacy Questionnaire. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69 (3), 516-527. (2001)