Pre-College Programs
Pre-Baccalaureate Credit Courses

Pre-Baccalaureate Credit Courses Courses (28)

Remixing Racial Codes: Interraciality in Literature and Film Post-1945

Through a reading of select critical theory, literary texts, and films, students will look critically at the ways in which interracial relationships have been prescribed and figured in U.S. culture post-1945. Decentering the dominant narrative of black-white miscegenation, we will give equal attention to the role that Asian bodies play in complicating this binary. We will also...

Anthropology of Stuff

Our lives are surrounded by objects we make, gift, sell and buy. What can these objects tell us about who we are as humans? This course will introduce students to material anthropology, exploring what objects can tell us about culture, society and experience. We will talk about gifts, commodities, counterfeits, and copyrights. Students will learn how people make objects, how...

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites.

Cell and Molecular Biology

This course examines the structure and function of the basic unit of an organism, the cell. An experimental approach is used to examine cellular functions, ranging from gene transcription, cell division and protein secretion, to cell motility, and signal transduction. Relevance to health and disease will be considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 0200 or AP Biology score of 4 or 5.

Principles of Immunology

Introduction to experimental and theoretical foundations of immunology. Focuses on concepts, landmark experiments and recent advances. Topics include innate and adaptive immunity; structure/function of antibody molecules and T cell receptors; regulation of immune responses through cellular interactions. Applications of concepts to medically significant issues (vaccines, transplantation,...

Principles of Physiology

Introduction to the function and integration of animal systems with an emphasis on mammals. Includes basic concepts in cell and organ system physiology as well as fundamentals of modern trends in physiological science. Emphasizes the application of physical and chemical principles to animal function at both the cellular and systemic levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 0200 or AP Biology score of 4 or 5.

Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure

Explores the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, thermodynamics, solution equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. Course includes lecture and laboratory sections. Laboratory cannot be taken without the lecture. Students who previously passed 0330 lab may be excused from repeating the lab portion of the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 0100,...

An Introduction to Contemplative Studies

Introduction to the new field of Contemplative Studies focusing on identifying methods human beings have found, across cultures and across time, to concentrate, broaden and deepen conscious awareness. We will study what these methods and experiences entail, how to critically appraise them, how to experience them ourselves, and how they influence the development of empathy,...

Meditation, Mindfulness and Health

This course provides an overview on the relation of mindfulness (the ability to attend in a nonjudgmental way to one’s own physical and mental processes during ordinary, everyday tasks) with various health outcomes and disease risk factors such as depression, anxiety, pain management, diet, substance use, and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which mindfulness may...

Principles of Economics

Extensive coverage of economic issues, institutions, and vocabulary, plus an introduction to economic analysis and its application to current social problems. Required for all economics concentrators. Course serves as a prerequisite for ECON 1110, 1130, 1210 and 1620. Serves as a general course for students who will take no other economics courses and want a broad introduction to the discipline.

Financial Accounting

Basic accounting theory and practice. Accounting procedures for various forms of business organizations.

Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment...

Reading French in the Arts and Sciences

Designed to develop the reading competence in French for graduate students (or advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor). Fundamentals of grammar and syntax are emphasized as well as reading skills in the fields of individual students. Successful completion should satisfy the foreign language requirement for graduate students in other departments. (Consult...

The American Civil War

In this course we will investigate the "felt histories" of the American Civil War -- the personal experiences of Americans (northerners and southerners, slaves and freed people, European immigrants and Native Americans, men and women) who fought its battles and bore its consequences. These histories, as Robert Penn Warren notes, are an "index to the very complexity,...

The Romans

The Romans established the only successful pan-Mediterranean empire in history, lasting nearly 1,000 years, with its legacy living everywhere today, from the U.S. Constitution to the English alphabet. Who were these people? How did they ever conquer and maintain such a vast territory and for so long? And what did it mean to be a Roman? This course explores these basic, yet...

Evil: The History of an Idea

This course considers how individuals and societies have constructed the idea of evil. We examine evil’s origins in religious traditions and review how those interpretations have been deployed and how the concept of evil has changed over time. Is it possible to offer a universal definition of evil? Is it true that “When a woman thinks alone, she thinks evil?”...

Essentials of the Latin Language

An intensive two-semester approach to Latin with special emphasis on developing facility in the rapid reading of Latin literature. No previous knowledge of Latin is required.

Fiction I

A workshop for students who have little or no previous experience in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to 17 per section. This course is limited to undergraduates and pre-baccalaureates. Grade Option: S (Satisfactory) / NC (No Credit) only. Enrollment limited to 17.

Introductory Calculus, Part I

An intensive course in calculus of one variable including limits, differentiation, maxima and minima, the chain rule, rational functions, trigonometric functions, and exponential functions. Introduction to integration with applications to area and volumes of revolution. MATH 0090 and 0100, or AP Calculus BC score 4 or 5 are recommended for all students intending to concentrate...

Introductory Calculus, Part II

A continuation of the material of MATH 0090 including further development of integration, techniques of integration, and applications. Other topics include infinite series, power series, Taylor's formula, polar and parametric equations, and an introduction to differential equations. MATH 0090 and 0100, or AP Calculus BC score 4 or 5 are recommended for all students intending...

The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience

Introduction to the mammalian nervous system with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement and speech, learning and memory, emotion, and diseases of the brain. No prerequisites, but knowledge of biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed.

Critical Reasoning

The overall goal of this course is to improve students' ability to think clearly and carefully and to enable them to identify and evaluate arguments. This includes enabling them to: understand and apply relevant concepts like truth, validity, and soundness; determine the structure of an argument; work with arguments using basic propositional logic; understand and apply...

Meditation, Mindfulness and Health

This course provides an overview on the relation of mindfulness (the ability to attend in a nonjudgmental way to one’s own physical and mental processes during ordinary, everyday tasks) with various health outcomes and disease risk factors such as depression, anxiety, pain management, diet, substance use, and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which mindfulness may...

Basic Physics (3)

Survey of mechanics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics for concentrators in sciences other than physics-including premedical students or students without prior exposure to physics who require a less rigorous course than PHYS 0050, 0060. Employs the concepts of elementary calculus but little of its technique. Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. Twelve hours...

Persuasive Communication

Provides an introduction to public speaking, and helps students develop confidence in public speaking through the presentation of persuasive speeches. Primarily for seniors. Limited to 18. Instructor's permission required. No permission will be given during pre-registration; interested students should sign up well in advance on the TAPS 0220 waitlist (form is at http://www.brown.edu/academics/theatre-arts-performance-studies/undergraduate-program/required-course-information)...

Acting

Focus on elements of dramatic analysis and interpretation as applied to the art of acting, and, by extension, directing. Monologues, scene study, and improvisation are basis for comment on individual problems. Reading of dramatic texts and theory. Substantial scene rehearsal commitment necessary. Attendance mandatory. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20....

Studio Foundation

An introduction to basic visual art concepts, exploring a range of materials with emphasis on experimentation and analysis of visual relationships. Drawing is a vital part of this course. VISA 0100 or 0110 is a prerequisite to any advanced studio course work at Brown or the Rhode Island School of Design. Under certain circumstances a student may petition for a waiver of this requirement upon submission of a portfolio.

3-D Foundation

This is an extensive study in form and structure to develop spatial understanding and the fundamentals of 3-dimensional design and construction. Students will explore the structural, compositional and conceptual implications of basic materials, such as wood, metal, plaster and found objects. Projects are designed as a means for investigating a variety of sculptural processes....