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Rhode Island is Going Mobile

Mashapaug Pond-one of the sites that will be featured on Mobile Rhode Island:

The John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage and the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities will collaborate to create a Rhode Island statewide mobile application, tentatively titled, “Mobile RI.” The appearance and format of the app will be similar to Sakonnet Historical, a mobile app developed by the Center for Public Humanities, the Tiverton Public Library, and the Little Compton Historical Society, with funding and support by RICH.

(Distributed January 31, 2014)

EMBODIED HISTORIES: American Dance Legacy Initiative (ADLI) at the Center for Public Humanities

Student at Central Falls High School doing “Body Research” on José Limón:

Dances by American choreographers provide unique insight into American history and culture, yet Americans, historically, have not turned to dancers or dance institutions to deepen their understanding of America. In fact, as a culture, we have privileged the visual arts and the word over the performing arts, particularly dance, and turned to literature, paintings, sculpture, and artifacts to tell the story of who we are and from whence we came.

(Distributed January 23, 2014)

Mapping 100 years of African Diasporic Arts History in Providence

Mapping Arts – Providence reveals the lives, influence, and work of black artists in Providence from the 1860s through the 1960s. The project connects the legacies of artists including painter Edward Bannister, singer Sarah Vaughan, and jazz musician James Berry, who all spent time in the city and shaped its cultural landscape. The hub of the project is a digital map with historical information and images about black artistic influence on Providence.

(Distributed December 5, 2013)
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