Courses for Spring 2016

  • The Family

    The state of the contemporary family generates debate within and beyond sociology. That debate is considered by examining different definitions of family, changing gender roles within the family, and the family in cross-cultural context. Special issues include new family forms, such as gay and lesbian families and biological and step-parenthood, as well as changing patterns of work and housework.
    SOC 0170 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Inequalities and Health

    We start from the assumption that the social organization of society shapes definitions and experiences of health and illness, the distribution of diseases, and the responses to them. We explore the relevance of social structure and social interaction to health and well-being, emphasizing socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, and social contexts such as relationships, families, schools, and neighborhoods. This is not a "sociology of medicine" course. It will not emphasize the profession of medicine, health care policy, or health care organizations. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT
    SOC 0300K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship (ESP Seminar)

    Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Enrollment limited to Engaged Scholars Program participants. Limited to 20 students per section.
    SOC 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hance
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fussell
    SOC 1100 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C05
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C06
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • The Enlightened Entrepreneur: Changemakers, Inspired Protagonists and Unreasonable People

    This course explores the practices of enlightened entrepreneurs, with the intention of moving beyond the limiting social/commercial dichotomy to develop a more useful paradigm for understanding entrepreneurs whose ventures lead to positive developments in society and in the environment. You will be exploring the success stories and cautionary tales of entrepreneurs to develop an understanding of how ventures can have an impact on their fields of engagement as well as their fields of influence. Afterwards you will develop an assessment tool for understanding the spectrum of entrepreneurs whose ventures lead to positive developments in society and in the environment.
    SOC 1115 S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Market Research in Public and Private Sectors

    Introduction to data and research methods for private and public sector organizations. Data used in market research include trends in the population of consumers, economic trends, trends within sectors and industries, analyses of product sales and services, and specific studies of products, promotional efforts, and consumer reactions. Emphasizes the use of demographic, GIS, and other available data.
    SOC 1260 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Macro-Organizational Theory: Organizations in Social Context

    Macro-Organizational Theory focuses on the organization and its social/economic environment. This class will explore various definitions of the organization’s environment, and the many types of macro-level organizational structures in which sets of organizations interact, function, compete, and cooperate. Important questions to be asked include the following:

    -What is an organizational environment and how do organizations “deal” with what is outside of their boundaries?

    -How are the boundaries of organizations defined/recognized/function?

    -How do environments influence organizational strategy and performance?

    -What are the major theories for assessing macro-level organizational phenomena?

    -What are the many ways in which organizations relate to other organizations?
    SOC 1315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Remaking the City

    Cities are being reshaped by immigration, economic restructuring, and other forces. This course reviews these changes from several perspectives, including the patterns and causes of change, the role of politics and public policy, and how different groups of people (by class, race, and national origin) manage under the new conditions. Readings will emphasize historical and cross-national comparisons.
    SOC 1330 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • Globalization and Social Conflict

    Examines the effect globalization is having on the economies and societies of the developed and developing world. Focuses in particular on how new forms of global production and networking are transforming the traditional role of the nation-state, creating new dynamics of wealth distribution, and generating new sources of social conflict and political contestation, including transnational social movements. WRIT
    SOC 1620 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Investing in Social Change

    Philanthropy -- "giving away money" -- sounds attractive and simple. But the very acts of contributing and receiving resources affect dynamics and relationships among all involved. We explore philanthropic strategies, social change, the sociological dimensions of philanthropy in historic and current practice. Students engage in teams to investigate a particular community concern, design an investment strategy, recommend the investment of grant dollars. Instructor permission required. Course enrollment is by application only. Applications can be found at swearercenter.brown.edu shortly before the start of class. Students who pre-register must still be selected through the application process and attend the first class meeting. Enrollment limited to 18. WRIT
    SOC 1870A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Trimble
  • Demographics and Development

    Assesses the social and economic determinants and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration and their impact on the size, distribution, and composition of population in developing societies. Implications of the evolving population structure for planning and policy. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT
    SOC 1870K S01
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development

    This seminar provides an introduction to the study of development. It looks at the diversity of understandings of the concept of development as well as its practical importance in the world. Students will read texts that present pressing questions and issues concerning development practices, policies, and theories. Efforts to connect broad theoretical debates to understanding contemporary problems will be encouraged. Enrollment limited to 20 sophomores. WRIT
    SOC 1871D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Migration, Displacement and Emerging Community Experiences: Contemporary Turkey

    This course explores Anatolia as a dynamic territory of transit, through a critical lens. We will study communities that have been formed through internal and international migration, displacement, and Otherness that forces people to organize along identity lines, resulting in emerging diverse communities within Turkey. We will look briefly at Anatolia’s past and focus primarily on contemporary Turkey. We will compare the reality of the population with the rhetoric and performance of ruling powers pertaining to indigenous status and belonging. Students will leave this course with a comprehensive understanding of population and identity formation in contemporary Turkey as they relate to migration and displacement. WRIT
    SOC 1871L S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Theories of the Third Sector and Civil Society

    Third Sector- consisting of non-government, nonprofit, social movements organizations-- is an increasingly important segment of societies worldwide. This seminar will train students to critically apply organizational theory to evaluate the contributions, opportunities and challenges of this sector. We will probe critical third sector issues, including: impact, accountability, and sustainability of sector activities; commons issues in the sector such as legitimacy and co-optation; the dynamics of government collaboration; and what constitutes social justice in the distribution of the sector's resources. Prerequisite: at least one course in Sociology. Enrollment preference given to Sociology and BEO concentrators. WRIT
    SOC 1871M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kallman
  • Sociology of Money

    What is money, wealth, their relationship? How have U.S. Markets for money changed this relationship? How have money markets changed? This is an introduction to current markets for money: how credit/debit is exchanged, how money is produced, what it represents in relation to global production, trade, and wealth distribution. Each week presents a question, than answers this question in two ways:1st explaining how financial instruments work within U.S. market (economic explanation), 2nd examining how financial instruments change market outcomes ( sociological critique). By the end students will understand how money markets work and how they effect the distribution of wealth.
    SOC 1872B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chuang
  • Global Sociology: Capitalism, Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World

    The idea of ‘modernity’ commonly rests on the shift from feudal to capitalist society and on political developments, such as the French Revolution. Often obscured in these narratives of modernity are the parallel developments of colonialism and empire that spanned the globe at the same time. Building on global historical sociology, this class goes beyond dichotomous view of history of West/non-West but instead seeks to outline transnational sociology that starts from ‘colonial modernity’. Emphasizing the parallel processes of capitalism and colonialism in the making the modern world, discuss how we can better understand contemporary sociological issues in Europe and beyond.
    SOC 1872E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hammer
  • Senior Seminar

    Advanced research seminar for sociology concentrators. Students take each semester in senior year to work on an honors thesis. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of thesis to the department. Students doing independent study research may also participate with the instructor's permission. Required for "honors" in sociology. WRIT
    SOC 1950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods II

    This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010
    SOC 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
  • Social Stratification, Inequality and Mobility

    This course provides an introduction to contemporary literature on social stratification, social mobility, inequality in the United States, abroad, based on research articles and books. We focus on theories, data, methods, facts about categorical dimensions of inequality (race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation); core dimensions of stratification systems (income, earnings and wealth distributions; poverty; education; the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status; social mobility); social institutions that govern social stratification (families, schools, labor markets, and the justice system); key inequalities that stem from stratification systems (e.g., health). This is a reading course, not a research seminar. Prerequisites include Sociology 2010 or equivalent.
    SOC 2030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Contemporary Sociology

    This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.
    SOC 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • Qualitative Methods

    Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.
    SOC 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Techniques of Demographic Analysis

    Procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data; measures of population composition, fertility, morality, and migration; construction of life tables, population and projections, population dynamics; responsible use of demographic methodology. Mandatory S/NC.
    SOC 2230 S02
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Event History Analysis

    An introduction to hazard models and their application to event history data in sociology. Topics include survival distributions, standard parametric models, discrete time approaches, partial likelihood models, and the introduction of covariates. Attention is given to practical application and the estimation of these models with software packages, where possible.
    SOC 2240 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Race, Ethnicity, and Nation: Boundaries, Identities, Inequalities

    This seminar aims to provide students a solid base in the analysis of racial and ethnic boundaries, identities, and inequalities. The seminar addresses a number of central topics in the field and acquaints the students with some key works. The course is divided in three parts. The first part focuses on how race constituted the modern world and on contemporary forms of racialization. The second part focuses on the construction of nations and challenges to their ethnic and racial boundaries. The third part of the course looks at contemporary boundaries of race and ethnicity in the United States. Open to upper level undergraduates with permission of instructor.
    SOC 2260D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Fertility

    An introduction to the study of the social determinants of human fertility. Contemporary and historical populations are considered. Theories and frameworks used to guide fertility research are reviewed. Special topics include: fertility decision-making, gender and fertility, work and fertility, adolescent fertility, and population policies and family planning programs.
    SOC 2360 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    No description available.
    SOC 2510 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis for the Social Sciences

    This course is intended for graduate students seeking to learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and how to incorporate spatial questions into social science research. The course is primarily a methods course and through required independent project work, students will learn how GIS and spatial analysis are typically employed across the social sciences. By the end students will be proficient in independent use of ArcGIS, most frequently used GIS software package, and will be able to apply the more common tools of spatial analysis. They will also know basics of cartography.
    SOC 2612 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
  • Comparative Political Sociology

    This course explores both classic and contemporary debates in political sociology. The central thematic is the relationship between democracy and power and includes theories of the state, markets, social class and civil society. The debates are explored through historical and comparative lenses, covering both old and new democracies. Some background in political or sociological theory is recommended.
    SOC 2960K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Bureaucracy and Regulation in Comparative Perspective

    This course will examine the management of government regulatory agencies in different domains of public policy and national contexts. It will focus on the apparent tension between rules and the probity and equity in the bureaucracy and laissez faire (i.e., an absence of rules) that allows for flexibility and adjustment in the market. We will pay particular careful attention to rational choice models derived from economics, and their modification by scholars in cognate social sciences, and we will draw examples from different domains including two workplace regulation and government support fro research and development in Europe and the America.
    SOC 2960X S02
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Family Demography

    This seminar provides a broad survey of the demographic literature on patterns and trends in family and household structures and processes. Students will be exposed to current theoretical, methodological, and substantive issues in family demography. We will cover important life course events including cohabitation, marriage, divorce and remarriage; marriage markets and assortative mating patterns; childbearing; child and elderly care; and gender, family, and work.
    SOC 2961C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2981 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Goldman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep