Courses for Fall 2015

  • Social Problems

    The discipline of sociology has frequently been characterized as the "science of industrial society." While the discipline's founding father's - Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim,-addressed the origins and consequences of industrial growth in nineteenth century Europe, their descendents have examined -and continue to examine- a wide array of social problems in a host of different historical and geographic contexts,e.g., the definition and diffusion of "terrorism," and the origins and consequences of ethnic and gender discrimination the world over.
    SOC 0010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Economic Development and Social Change

    Emphasis on understanding the interrelations among economic, political, and cultural aspects of change in developing countries. The experience of currently developing nations is contrasted to that of nations which industrialized in the 19th century. Compares the different development strategies which have been adopted by currently developing nations and their consequences for social change.
    SOC 0150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • Population and Society

    Introduces some of the major social issues relating to population size, growth, and change in industrialized and developing nations. Mortality, fertility, and migration levels and trends are analyzed. Also considers contemporary issues, such as HIV/AIDS epidemic, population aging, U.S. immigration, and national and international population policy debates.
    SOC 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Sex, Gender, and Society

    An introduction to the sociological study of sex and gender. More specifically, this course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender.
    SOC 0230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Classical Sociological Theory

    Why do we follow social rules and conventions? And how is social change – that is, the making of new rules and expectations – possible? When we respond to rules, do we act as free-willing individuals or do we follows social structures we have no control over? These questions have motivated generations of sociologists, but many of the arguments have been already developed by the four "forefathers" of sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. Looking at the transformations around them – the rise of capitalism, the modern nation-state, rational bureaucracy, the metropolitan, the decline of religion, and much more – they developed arguments that allow us to better understand ourselves, our actions, and the contemporary political, economic and social transformations around us. WRIT
    SOC 1010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    SOC 1100 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C05
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C06
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Focus Groups for Market and Social Research

    This course introduces students to a range of qualitative research methods commonly used in market and social science research. It is designed to provide students with a skill set that will allow them to conduct and design market and social research that gets below the surface of the traditional survey. Focus groups, ethnographic observation and user-centered research are widely used in product design, communications, marketing and entrepreneurship research. Students will learn and practice all of the methods introduced in the course by conducting a semester-long research project, will gain insight into which methods are most appropriate for particular research needs.
    SOC 1117 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
  • Market and Social Surveys

    This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population.
    SOC 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Creative Companies: Entrepreneurship, Markets, and the Culture Industry

    Firms in creative industries influence many physical and psychological aspects of our lives, from what we eat and wear to how we entertain ourselves, but markets for cultural goods are complex and difficult to navigate. Entrepreneurs must, therefore, understand the economic sociology of cultural market and ecosystem in order to capture economic value, a process that recursively relates to cultural norms. Students will analyze business cases of firms in a wide range of creative industries such as art, fashion, film, food, music, publishing, and theater to explore and understand the economic, organizational, and sociological underpinnings of culture, value(s), and markets.
  • Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World

    Applies sociological analysis to understand present and historical cases of ethnic and race relations and conflicts. Topics addressed are the social construction of race and ethnicity; historical processes of racialization; ethnic conflict and the nation state; and the linkages between race, class, and social mobility. Focuses on racial and ethnic relations in the U.S., but also has a strong international comparative component.
    SOC 1270 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Micro-Organizational Theory: Social Behavior in Organizations

    Micro-Organizational Theory focuses on the human dynamics of organizations as natural systems. It examines how individual attitudes, actions, and interactions make a difference for organizational processes and outcomes. This focus is contrasted with more macro-level approaches, which take the organization (instead of the individual) as the primary unit of analysis. For example, studies of organizations from an economic perspective are typically concerned with the performance of the organization relative to its competitors. Studies of organizations from a macro-sociological focus are typically concerned with an organization's routines and structures, contextualized by the broader environment. SOC 1311 takes a more micro and meso perspective that asks questions such as, "why do individuals in organization behave the way they do, how does this affect the organizations of which they are a part and how, in turn, are individuals affected by their organizations?"
    SOC 1311 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Social Structure and Personal Development

    The relationship between one's place in the social structure and one's own personal growth. Investigates the social aspects of individual growth and change throughout the life course. Also examines social factors involved in the failure to find a meaningful place for oneself in society.
    SOC 1430 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Alternatives to Violence

    We examine nonviolence as a method for resolving serious social conflict. We consider psychological and sociological approaches to understanding why people choose violence, as a precursor to studying theories of nonviolence. We investigate practioners of nonviolence throughout history and analyze nonviolence as a response to such issues as the death penalty, war, and terrorism. WRIT
    SOC 1870E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Knowledge Networks and Global Transformation

    How do refined knowledge and the social relations that organize and distribute it influence changes in the institutions, inequalities and cultural systems and practices that define particular world regions and global formations? And how do global transformations influence the trajectories of knowledge production themselves? We will examine particular knowledge-identified agents, including universities, research institutes, think tanks, and professional associations, to consider why they approach global transformations in the way that they do. And we will consider how particular kinds of global transformations, from the end of the cold war and the transformation of information/communication technology to the last financial crisis, affect knowledge production itself. By exploring intersections between global complexity and reflexivity in this fashion, we hope to increase our own capacities for seeing the world not only as it is, but how knowledge might be used in making better alternatives for the future. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT
    SOC 1871R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Geographical Analysis of Society

    Provides an introduction to a geographical approach to understanding the spatial organization of individuals, societies, and economies. The two main emphases are on theories/concepts and applied analytical tools. We will learn about key theories in geography, sociology, and economics that have attempted to organize and classify the spatial structures and interactions across space of social and economic actors and will work with related analytical techniques. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. WRIT
    SOC 1871W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
  • Race and Ethnic Relations, Identity, and Inequality

    This course provides an overview of perspectives used in sociological studies of race and ethnicity. It focuses on race and ethnic relation, boundaries, and inequalities through empirical research on interracial or interethnic contact opportunities and racial, ethnic change and variation in interracial or interethnic relationship, romance, and marriage. The goal of the course is to deepen the understanding that racial/ethnic boundaries are rigid, yet may be crossed, blurred, or shifted over time and across generations.
  • Senior Seminar

    Advanced research seminar for sociology concentrators. Students take each semester in senior year to work on an honors thesis. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of thesis to the department. Students doing independent study research may also participate with the instructor's permission. Required for "honors" in sociology. WRIT
    SOC 1950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bridwell-Mitchell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bridwell-Mitchell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods I

    Introduction to probability, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Coverage of the linear model, its assumptions and potential biases. Emphasis on hypothesis testing, model selection and interpretation through application with real data.
    SOC 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Classical Sociological Theory

    This is a graduate-level course requires students to engage in detailed analysis and critical review of sociological thought of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The class will introduce students to the critical thinking, methodological innovation, and historical imagination of sociological theory by reading the original texts of the forefathers of sociology, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.
    SOC 2040 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Principles of Population

    An advanced introduction to theoretical and substantive issues in the social scientific study of population. Major areas within sociology are integrated with the study of population, including the comparative–historical analysis of development, family processes, social stratification, ethnicity, ecological studies, and social policy. Primarily for first year Graduate students.
    SOC 2080 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fussell
  • Comparative Historical Analysis

    The seminar focuses on the application of theory and method in historical sociology. It will combine the reading of exemplary works, both classical and current, in comparative-historical sociology, with an exploration of historical methods that involves methodological readings but focuses on students' use of archives in their own individual research. For graduate students only.
    SOC 2600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • Urban Sociology

    This course will review alternative theoretical perspectives on urban and regional development with an emphasis on variants of ecological and political economy approaches. Substantive topics will include metropolitan restructuring in the U.S. and abroad, growth politics and growth control, neighborhood social networks and collective action, and incorporation of immigrants and minority groups in the metropolis.
    SOC 2960C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • Sociology of Organizations Graduate Seminar

    The sociology of organizations offers a burgeoning and vibrant literature, with relevance not only for self-identified organizational sociologists, but also for scholars in fields as diverse as politics, development, industrial relations, finance, education, health care, and the arts. This seminar offers an intensive exploration of the "state of play" in contemporary macro-organizational theory. Shared and individual readings, coupled with weekly discussions and email dialogues, allow students to refine and extend their thinking on a series of important and controversial topics in the recent literature. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, the syllabus is aimed primarily at graduate students who enjoy some prior familiarity with organizational theory, whether in sociology or a kindred discipline. Enrollment limited to 15.
    SOC 2960M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Bureaucracy and Regulation in Comparative Perspective

    This course will examine the management of government regulatory agencies in different domains of public policy and national contexts. It will focus on the apparent tension between rules and the probity and equity in the bureaucracy and laissez faire (i.e., an absence of rules) that allows for flexibility and adjustment in the market. We will pay particular careful attention to rational choice models derived from economics, and their modification by scholars in cognate social sciences, and we will draw examples from different domains including two workplace regulation and government support fro research and development in Europe and the America.
    SOC 2960X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Causal Analysis

    "Does premarital cohabitation protect marriage?" "Does reducing class size improve elementary school education?" "Is there racial discrimination in the market for home loans?" We often use associations to claim causal effects. This course provide a broad introduction to casual analysis. We will address casual inference form observational and quasi-experimental research designs. Topics include instrumental variables estimation, difference-in-difference models, regression discontinuity, matching, propensity scores, heterogeneous treatment effects, and fixed effects models. The prerequisite of this course is SOC 2020 or equivalent.
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep