Pre-College Programs

2014 Course Catalog (41)

An Introduction to Africana Studies

This course introduces students to the vibrant and contested field of Africana Studies by critically exploring and analyzing the links and disjunctures in the cultural, political, and intellectual practices and experiences of people of African descent throughout the African diaspora. Beginning with a critical overview of the history, theoretical orientations, and multiple methodological...

Revolting Bodies: Aesthetics, Representation, and Popular Culture

Our bodies make us feel (un)comfortable, sublime, ridiculous, grotesque. In this course we examine how social and visual images of our bodies force us to consider our identities in socially approved ways. We employ cultural and disability studies, queer theory, science fiction, and film to ask how representations structure the way we "know" and "see" bodies....

Celluloid America

The American motion picture developed as a unique art form in the late 19th century and its enduring cultural and social significance is irrefutable. In this course, we will explore US history using cinema to explore the cultural values represented within and shaped by the medium. Topics include the invention of the moving image, the rise and fall of the Hollywood studio system,...

Anthropology of Stuff

Our lives are surrounded by objects we make, gift, sell and buy. What can these objects tell us about who we are as humans? This course will introduce students to material anthropology, exploring what objects can tell us about culture, society and experience. We will talk about gifts, commodities, counterfeits, and copyrights. Students will learn how people make objects, how...

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites.

Introduction to Human Physiology

An introduction to human physiology aimed primarily at undergraduates who are not concentrating in biology. Topics include basic cardiovascular, respiratory, kidney, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and neuromuscular function, as well as aspects of reproduction and exercise physiology. Not for biology concentration credit. BIOL 0060 should not be taken following BIOL 0800 or the equivalent.

Cell and Molecular Biology

This course examines the structure and function of the basic unit of an organism, the cell. An experimental approach is used to examine cellular functions, ranging from gene transcription, cell division and protein secretion, to cell motility, and signal transduction. Relevance to health and disease will be considered. Expected: BIOL 0200 (or equivalent placement).

Principles of Immunology

Introduction to experimental and theoretical foundations of immunology. Focuses on concepts, landmark experiments and recent advances. Topics include innate and adaptive immunity; structure/function of antibody molecules and T cell receptors; regulation of immune responses through cellular interactions. Applications of concepts to medically significant issues (vaccines, transplantation,...

Principles of Physiology

Introduction to the function and integration of animal systems with an emphasis on mammals. Includes basic concepts in cell and organ system physiology as well as fundamentals of modern trends in physiological science. Emphasizes the application of physical and chemical principles to animal function at both the cellular and systemic levels. Expected: BIOL 0200 or equivalent.

Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure

Explores the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, thermodynamics, solution equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. Required background: CHEM 0100 or AP Chemistry 4 or CHEM Placement Test 8 or IBC Chemistry.

Students MUST register for all four components of this course (the common meeting, lecture, lab and conference) during the...

The Idea of Self

Literature gestures us toward a certain kind of knowledge not quite psychological, not quite philosophical. We read widely in the classical and medieval traditions in order to gauge the peculiar nature of what this knowledge tells us about experience and the ways in which expressions of selfhood abide or are changed over time. Authors include Sappho, Catullus, Horace, Virgil,...

Literature and the American Presidency

We are accustomed to engaging the American presidency as a public office best approached through the prism of government, political science, and the like. This course studies the presidency through a literary lens, "literary" understood broadly to designate the study of words in multiple media, using five broad categories as our touchstones: memory, language, consolation,...

Literature and Knowledge

What is knowledge? How do we know what we know? We will read literary texts concerned with these questions to consider how knowledge relates to power, and how deception, stupidity, and mystification force us to question what we know. Readings include Austen, Hawthorne, Melville, Flaubert, James, and Schnitzler.

The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict in History, Literature, Film

An examination of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict through the lens of cultural production. We will read literature and film in combination with historical texts, exploring how cultural producers have responded to key events from the partition of Palestine in 1947 until the second Intifada. We will examine the way that novels, poetry, documentaries and films provide us with...

Principles of Economics

Extensive coverage of economic issues, institutions, and vocabulary, plus an introduction to economic analysis and its application to current social problems. Required for all economics concentrators. Prerequisite for ECON 1110, 1130, 1210 and 1620. Serves as a general course for students who will take no other economics courses and want a broad introduction to the discipline....

Financial Accounting

Basic accounting theory and practice. Accounting procedures for various forms of business organizations.

Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment...

Good, Evil, and Inbetween

Are humans born naturally good, evil, neither, or all of the above? Does evil lurk deep within the heart of all that is good, or can the forces of good eradicate those of evil? Is evil an inextricable part of what it means to be human in the first place? We'll examine these and related questions by reading some especially provocative literature, including Frankenstein,...

Reading French in the Arts and Sciences

Designed to develop the reading competence in French for graduate students (or advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor). Fundamentals of grammar and syntax are emphasized as well as reading skills in the fields of individual students. Successful completion should satisfy the foreign language requirement for graduate students in other departments. (Consult...

German for Reading

Intensive introduction to German grammar and syntax for students without prior knowledge of German and from all academic disciplines. Primarily for graduate students but also open to undergraduates. The student who successfully completes this course will have the necessary foundation for reading and translating German texts for students.

Please note that this is a blended...

The Inquisition, Conversos, and Early Capitalism in the Atlantic World: 1492-1700

This course explores the rise and fall of converso (Sephardic Jews forced to convert to Christianity) trading networks in the Atlantic world. In particular, we will focus on the converso communities in Spanish America, and consider how the institution of the Inquisition was used to control, and eventually to eradicate, this trading community. While the emphasis is on Spanish...

World War II in Europe: History, Experience, Memory

World War II was the defining event of the twentieth century. This course will focus on the military, political, social and cultural dimensions of the war in Europe and the USSR. Topics and themes include: Hitler’s war aims; the uses of propaganda; civilian mobilization and "total" war; the Grand Alliance; racial policies and genocide; and the collaboration...

Essentials of the Latin Language

An intensive two-semester approach to Latin with special emphasis on developing facility in the rapid reading of Latin literature. No previous knowledge of Latin is required.

Fiction I

A workshop for students who have little or no previous experience in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to 17 per section. S/NC. WRIT

Screenwriting I

A workshop for students who have little or no previous experience in writing screenplays. S/NC. Enrollment limited to 17.

Graphic Novels and Comic Masterworks

Focused on the influence of graphic novels and comic art, this course looks at examples of graphic novels and comic art from seminal texts like Art Spiegleman's Maus through a range of mainstream and independent comics from Marjane Satrapi, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, David B., Lynda Barry, Daniel Clowes, Frank Miller, and many others, including graphic memoir, reportage,...

Calculus with Applications to Social Science

A one-semester survey of calculus for students who wish to learn the basics of calculus for application to social sciences or for cultural appreciation as part of a broader education. Topics include functions, equations, graphs, exponentials and logarithms, and differentiation and integration; applications such as marginal analysis, growth and decay, optimization, and elementary...

Introductory Calculus, Part I

An intensive course in calculus of one variable including limits, differentiation, maxima and minima, the chain rule, rational functions, trigonometric functions, and exponential functions. Introduction to integration with applications to area and volumes of revolution. MATH 0090 and 0100 or the equivalent are recommended for all students intending to concentrate in the sciences or mathematics. S/NC only.

Introductory Calculus, Part II

A continuation of the material of MATH 0090 including further development of integration, inverse trigonometric and logarithmic functions, techniques of integrations, and applications. Other topics include infinite series, power series, Taylor's formula, introduction to differential equations, and numerical methods. MATH 0090 and 0100 or the equivalent are recommended...

Harmonic Convergence: Music’s Intersection with Science, Mathematics, History and Literature

An examination of research on music and the brain; connections between music, mathematics and history; and music's interrelationship with literature. Readings include The Power of Music (Mannes), Musicophilia (Sacks), The Kreutzer Sonata (Tolstoy), Doctor Faustus (Mann), A Clockwork Orange (Burgess), and writings by Morike, Hofstadter, Vaget, and Taruskin, in which music...

The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience

Introduction to the mammalian nervous system with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement and speech, learning and memory, emotion, and diseases of the brain. No prerequisites, but knowledge of biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed.

The Place of Persons

An introduction to the practice of philosophy through the study of key questions concerning the nature of persons and their place in the world. Topics covered will include, 'Reason and Religion', 'The Mind-Body Problem', 'Personal Identity', 'Free Will, Determinism, and Responsibility', and 'The Objectivity of Values'. These...

Critical Reasoning

A study of the techniques and principles of correct reasoning and effective communication. Topics may include deduction and induction, meaning and definition, fallacies in reasoning, the basic logic of propositions and predicates, and the essentials of inductive reasoning.

Basic Physics (3)

Survey of mechanics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics for concentrators in sciences other than physics-including premedical students or students without prior exposure to physics who require a less rigorous course than PHYS 0050, 0060. Employs the concepts of elementary calculus but little of its technique. Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. Six hours of attendance. Recommended: MATH 0090 or 0100.

Islam: From Mohamed to the Present

In this course, the historical origins and development of Islam will be studied in light of the sources and communities that shaped it. Themes to be explored include the central doctrines of Islam as derived from the Qur'an and traditions (sunna), the development of Islamic law (shari'ah) the Shi'i alternative, the growth of Muslim theology, philosophy, and...

Persuasive Communication

Provides an introduction to public speaking, and helps students develop confidence in public speaking through the presentation of persuasive speeches. Primarily for seniors. Limited to 18. Instructor's permission required. No permission will be given during pre-registration; interested students should sign up well in advance on the TAPS 0220 waitlist (form is at http://www.brown.edu/academics/theatre-arts-performance-studies/undergraduate-program/required-course-information)...

Meditation and the Brain: Applications in Basic and Clinical Science

This class is a detailed exploration of the most recent neuroscientific research of meditation. The course explores the cognitive, affective, and neurophysiological effects of meditation practices with reference to their clinical applications in health, psychiatry and medicine. Current methodological challenges and directions for future research will also be explored.

Contemplative Approaches to Living and Dying

One of the central components of a religious tradition are beliefs about the meaning of human existence - a meaning that is constructed in relation to the significance of one’s inevitable death, the nature of the afterlife, and conceptions of salvation. These core beliefs also deeply inform the ethics, rituals, and contemplative practices of religious communities. Through...

An Introduction to Contemplative Studies

Introduction to the new field of Contemplative Studies focusing on identifying methods human beings have found, across cultures and across time, to concentrate, broaden and deepen conscious awareness. We will study what these methods and experiences entail, how to critically appraise them, how to experience them ourselves, and how they influence the development of empathy,...

Studio Foundation

An introduction to basic visual art concepts, exploring a range of materials with emphasis on experimentation and analysis of visual relationships. Drawing is a vital part of this course.

3-D Foundation

This is an extensive study in form and structure intended to develop spatial understanding and the fundamentals of 3-dimensional design and construction. Students will explore the structural, compositional and conceptual implications of basic materials, such as wood, metal, plaster and found objects. Projects are designed as a means for investigating a variety of sculptural...