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Under the Tongue: African Writers Converge at Brown
The International Writers Project at Brown University presents Under the Tongue: A Festival of Literature from Africa, on April 15 and 16, 2008. This series of readings and discussions will feature award-winning African novelists Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigeria), Nuruddin Farah (Somalia), and Chenjerai Hove (Zimbabwe); poet Jack Mapanje (Malawi); and playwrights Pierre Mumbere Mujomba (Congo) and Charles Mulekwa (Uganda). All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   07-133    04/14/2008   Beebe
Brown Students Hold Environmental Sustainability Conference
Students at Brown University have organized a two-day conference to promote environmental sustainability. The conference brings together a wide range of environmental leaders, including Ira Magaziner, chairman of the Clinton Global Initiative; U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse; Gov. Donald Carcieri; and Adam Werbach, global CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi.
News Release   07-132    04/14/2008   Kidwell
Network News Legend Tom Brokaw to Speak, Sign Books
Author and former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw will speak on Monday, April 21, 2008. at 6 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. The lecture, sponsored by the Office of the President, is free and open to the public. At 5 p.m., prior to the lecture, Brokaw will sign copies of his books Boom! and The Greatest Generation in Sayles Hall.
News Release   07-129    04/10/2008   Beebe
Bolivian President Evo Morales to Deliver Ogden Lecture
Bolivian President Evo Morales will deliver a Stephen A. Ogden ’60 Memorial Lecture on April 22, 2008, at 4 p.m. in Sayles Hall. Morales is the first indigenous head of state in Bolivia’s history. His talk comes as part of a University-wide focus on Latin American issues.
News Release   07-130    04/10/2008   Beebe
Fast Food? Brown Students Make and Race Edible Cars
Brown University engineering students have organized the campus’s first Edible Car Competition, in which teams build and race vehicles made out of food – with materials ranging from bagels to butternut squash.
News Release   07-127    04/08/2008   Lewis
Times Writer Thomas Friedman to Give Earth Day Lecture
Pulitzer-Prize-winning New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman will speak about the environment on April 22, 2008, at 6 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101.
News Release   07-125    04/07/2008   Beebe
Mellon Foundation Grant to Fund Dissertation Workshops
The Brown University Graduate School has received a $571,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue a program that supports graduate students during the writing of their dissertations.
News Release   07-126    04/07/2008   Beebe
Latin American Independence Celebrated at Brown
Writer Carlos Fuentes and former heads of state from Chile and Spain join dozens of historians, literary scholars, and writers from Europe and the Americas at Brown University April 9-12, 2008 for a conference to celebrate the bicentenary of Latin American independence.
News Release   07-123    04/03/2008   Beebe
Tommy Thompson To Discuss Uninsured at Annual Barnes Lecture
Tommy Thompson, former U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services and former Wisconsin governor, delivers the Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes Jr. Lecture in Public Health on Tuesday, April 8, 2008. The lecture begins at 4 p.m. in Andrews Hall and is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-124    04/03/2008   Beebe
Brown Hosts Regional Bioengineering Conference
Brown University for the first time hosts the 34th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference on April 4-6, 2008. The gathering includes talks on the latest advances in bioengineering research and nanotechnology, such as the “printing” of human organs from ink jets and a new, injectable method for relieving lower back pain.
News Release   07-121    03/31/2008   Lewis
New Research Provides Genetic Clue to Parkinson's Disease
Researchers at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and at Rhode Island Hospital have discovered a gene that appears to be directly linked to the development of Parkinson’s disease in people with a family history of the disease. The gene is one of only a handful linked to Parkinson’s and one of just two genes known to be a common contributor to this degenerative disease, which has no known cause or cure.
News Release   07-118    03/20/2008   Lawton
Beirut Bombings, 9/11 Inspire Artist Walid Raad
Lebanese artist Walid Raad juxtaposes video and still images, truth and fiction in his solo show at Brown University’s Bell Gallery. Raad, who focuses on the history of Beirut bombings and the post-9/11 political landscape, will give a presentation at the show’s opening on April 9, 2008.
News Release   07-119    03/19/2008   Beebe
Report: Stagnant NIH Budgets May Derail Promising Researchers
Brown University and six other academic research institutions today released a report that concludes that five years of flat funding for the National Institutes of Health puts a generation of science at risk. The report, released at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., also warns about the consequences of continued lack of action on the nation’s biomedical budget.
News Release   07-116    03/11/2008   Lawton
Brown University and the University of Cape Town Partner To Promote Business Capacity in Africa
Brown and the University of Cape Town have entered into a five-year partnership that will improve and deliver business education to entrepreneurs in Africa, particularly to women. The partnership is part of a larger international initiative led by Goldman Sachs to increase the number of underserved women receiving a business and management education.
News Release   07-112    03/05/2008   Kidwell
U.S. High School Students Take Their Concerns to State Capitols
High school students in seven states will bring their opinions on global issues from the classroom to the statehouse, directly to elected officials and civic leaders. These statehouse visits are part of the 10th annual Capitol Forum on America’s Future, an initiative of the Choices Program at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies.
News Release   07-111    03/04/2008   Beebe
Brown Mathematicians Prove New Way To Build a Better Estimate
Brown University applied mathematicians have found a new way to sift through mountains of data and draw reliable inferences from it – a Holy Grail in science and technology. Their pioneering work, the development of a new class of statistical estimators, could lead to better methods for analyzing the large data sets that are increasingly common in fields from biology to business. Results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   07-109    02/28/2008   Lawton
Corporation Endorses Phase II of Plan for Academic Enrichment
The Corporation of Brown University has endorsed a set of “Phase II” recommendations that extend the University’s strategic Plan for Academic Enrichment. The Corporation also approved the proposed budget for fiscal 2009, set tuition and fees, and formally accepted a number of significant gifts.
News Release   07-104    02/23/2008   Chapman
Brown Announces New, Expanded Financial Aid Policy
The Corporation of Brown University has approved a new financial aid policy that eliminates loans for students whose family incomes are less than $100,000, reduces loans for all students who receive financial aid and no longer requires a parental contribution from most families with incomes of up to $60,000.
News Release   07-105    02/23/2008   Chapman
Brown Approves Budget and Sets Tuition; Endowment Draw Grows
Brown’s undergraduate tuition and fees for 2008-09 will rise 3.9 percent to $47,740. The Corporation has also authorized a higher endowment payout for fiscal 2009 to sustain momentum for the University’s continuing investments in academic enrichment.
News Release   07-106    02/23/2008   Chapman
Pembroke Center Exhibition Celebrates Women's History Month
The Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women is celebrating Women’s History Month 2008 with an exhibit highlighting the historical achievements of Brown and Rhode Island women. Disturbances: An Exhibit of Select Materials from the Christine Dunlap Farnham Archives is on view at the John Hay Library from Friday, March 14, through Wednesday, April 9, 2008. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-095    02/19/2008   Baum
Former Iraqi Minister Ali Allawi to Speak on Modern Middle East
Ali A. Allawi, former senior minister in the post-Saddam government of Iraq and author of The Occupation of Iraq: Winning the War, Losing the Peace, will deliver the inaugural Peter Green Lecture on the Modern Middle East. His talk, titled “The Iraq Crisis and the Future Middle East Order,” will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2008, at 5 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. Allawi will sign copies of his book at 4 p.m. in the lobby.
News Release   07-103    02/13/2008   Baum
Best-Selling Author Michael Pollan to Speak at Brown
Writer Michael Pollan will discuss his new best seller, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, in a Feb. 21, 2008, lecture at 6 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. The Committee on Science and Technology Studies is sponsoring Pollan’s talk, which is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-098    02/12/2008   Lawton
Poet Michael Harper Awarded Frost Medal for Lifetime Achievement
Michael S. Harper, University Professor and professor of English at Brown, will be awarded the prestigious 2008 Frost Medal from the Poetry Society of America for lifetime achievement in American poetry.
News Release   07-099    02/12/2008   Baum
Brown Organizes Conference on Green Technology Opportunities
Brown University’s Forum for Enterprise is the host of a conference to showcase the latest in “green” technology at the Rhode Island Convention Center on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008. The conference brings together the region’s top business leaders to address cutting edge topics in this emerging field, from environmentally friendly building to “green ventures” in business.
News Release   07-100    02/12/2008   Kidwell
Clinton Holds Slim Lead Over Obama for R.I. Presidential Primary
Researchers at Brown University have found, in a statewide survey of 739 registered Rhode Island voters conducted Feb. 9-10, 2008, that Sen. Hillary Clinton holds a slim lead over Sen. Barack Obama among likely voters in the Rhode Island Democratic primary. The survey also gauges public opinion of national and state leaders, finds opposition to raising the state’s general income or sales taxes and finds support for two-year time limits on welfare.
News Release   07-097    02/11/2008   Baum
Brown at AAAS: Science and Religion to Science and Resilience
Brown University faculty will present at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the largest scientific gathering in the world, on topics ranging from global health to global warming. AAAS attracts thousands of researchers, policy-makers and journalists. AAAS will be held in Boston Feb. 14-18, 2008.
News Release   07-091    02/11/2008   Lawton
Exhibition Marks 400th Anniversary of Champlain in the New World
The John Carter Brown Library at Brown University presents the first of a series of international exhibitions celebrating the 400th anniversary of the founding of Quebec by Samuel de Champlain. On view in Providence through Thursday, Feb. 28, 2008, Hostile Intimacy: A Century and a Half of Conflict between New France and New England will also travel to Boston and Quebec this year. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-092    02/07/2008   Baum
John Bolton and Richard Holbrooke to Discuss U.S. Role in the U.N.
Former U.S. ambassadors to the United Nations Richard Holbrooke and John Bolton will discuss the role of the United States within the United Nations on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2008, at 3 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. The event is part of the Janus Forum Lecture Series, sponsored by Brown’s Political Theory Project. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-089    02/04/2008   Baum
Brown Joins Alliance to Increase Robotics Education and Research
Brown University has joined the Advancing Robotics Technology for Societal Impact (ARTSI) Alliance supported by the National Science Foundation, in an effort to boost the number of African-American students pursuing computer science and robotics.
News Release   07-087    01/30/2008   Lawton
Brown Mathematician David Mumford Wins Prestigious Wolf Prize
David Mumford, a pioneering Brown University mathematician, has won the 2008 Wolf Foundation Prize in Mathematics, one of the world’s top science prizes.
News Release   07-088    01/30/2008   Lawton
Health Insurance Co-Payments Deter Mammography Use
A new Brown University study shows that even small health insurance co-payments have a big effect on mammography rates. Rates for receiving these critical breast cancer screening exams were 8 percent lower in plans requiring co-payments compared with plans with full health insurance coverage. Researchers at Brown’s Alpert Medical School and Harvard Medical School publish their results in the New England Journal of Medicine.
News Release   07-082    01/23/2008   Lawton
Sheldon Whitehouse to Deliver Speech on Global Climate Change
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) will address the issue of global climate change in a speech to the Brown University community on Monday, Jan. 28, 2008, at noon. The speech will serve as a launch for the University’s participation in Focus the Nation, a national event organized to create a dialogue on global warming solutions.
News Release   07-083    01/22/2008   Kidwell
University Statement on Subpoena from N.Y. Attorney General
Brown University has confirmed that it is among the institutions that have been served with subpoenas by the attorney general of New York, inquiring about programs of international study.
News Release   07-084    01/22/2008   de Ramel
Cut Folded Dyed & Glued: Abstract Sculpture at the Bell Gallery
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present Cut Folded Dyed & Glued, an exhibition of paper and Mylar sculptures by artists Imi Hwangbo and Jae Ko, from Saturday, Jan. 26, through Wednesday, March 5, 2008. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Jan. 25, at 5:30 p.m. The exhibition and opening event are free and open to the public.
News Release   07-079    01/15/2008   Baum
Brown Planetary Geologists Lend Expertise to Mercury Mission
When NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft makes its historic flyby of Mercury on Monday, Jan. 14, 2008, Brown University students, led by planetary geologist James Head, will be part of the action. At mission headquarters and at Brown, these planetary experts will help analyze images from Mercury, the smallest and densest planet in the solar system. Head leads the MESSENGER mission’s geology group, overseeing analysis of Mercury’s volcanic features and dating rocks on the planet’s cratered surface.
News Release   07-080    01/11/2008   Lawton
Voter I.D. Requirements Reduce Political Participation, Study Finds
A new report released by Brown University shows that requiring voters to present identification at the polls leads to lower levels of political participation. The research also suggests that voter I.D. policies discourage legal immigrants from becoming citizens. The authors conclude that voter I.D. requirements have a significant political impact – particularly on the Hispanic vote.
News Release   07-078    01/07/2008   Baum
Brown Named Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Training
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University has been designated a Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Training by the John A. Hartford Foundation. The designation is accompanied by a major new grant for Rhode Island Hospital. The Hartford Centers of Excellence program is a $38-million initiative to help medical schools train geriatrics faculty, which are in critically short supply. By training teachers, the foundation aims to better prepare medical students to care for the growing “silver tsunami” of older Americans.
News Release   07-077    12/19/2007   Lawton
Anthropologist Awarded Fulbright to Study Masculinity in Mexico
Matthew Gutmann, associate professor of anthropology, was awarded a 2007-08 Fulbright fellowship to document and analyze perceptions and opinions in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca regarding democracy, the armed forces, and masculinity. The program also brings three international scholars to Brown this year: Alfredo Edmundo Huespe of Argentina, Nam Gyun Kim of Korea, and Qing Liu of China.
News Release   07-075    12/07/2007   Baum
Treasures on Display in From A.A. to Zouave: Collections at Brown
From A.A. to Zouave: Collections at Brown, an exhibition featuring more than 150 materials from Brown University’s libraries, museums, and galleries, is on view from Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2007, through Friday, May 30, 2008, in the Annmary Brown Memorial, 21 Brown St. The exhibition is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-074    12/06/2007   Baum
Early Voters Hold Most Power in Primaries, Say Brown Economists
As voters in Iowa and New Hampshire prepare to head to the polls for the 2008 presidential primary season, new research by two Brown University economists shows just how much power these early voters hold. In a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Brian Knight and Nathan Schiff demonstrate that early voters have up to 20 times the influence of voters in later states when it comes to candidate selection.
News Release   07-073    12/05/2007   Baum
Museum Loan Network Finds New Home at Brown University
The Museum Loan Network, an innovative program facilitating collection sharing among museums and promoting interdisciplinary collaboration with communities, will relocate to Brown University after 12 years at MIT. At Brown, the network will be based at the John Nicholas Brown Center’s Public Humanities Program, where it will continue its work fostering partnerships among cultural organizations and launch new programs to connect museums with the next generation of museum professionals.
News Release   07-069    12/04/2007   Baum
AIDS Activist and Former U.N. Official To Speak at Symposium
International AIDS activist Stephen Lewis will take part in a World AIDS Day symposium at Brown University on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2007, from 1 to 4 p.m. in Room 117 in Starr Auditorium at MacMillan Hall. The public event is free, but space is limited.
News Release   07-070    11/29/2007   Lawton
Cooper Pairs Found in Insulators as Well as in Superconductors
Fifty years ago, three physicists unveiled the BCS (Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer) theory of superconductivity, which explained how currents of electrons can flow perpetually if they join in pairs. Those physicists, including Leon Cooper at Brown University, won a Nobel Prize for their work. Now Brown physicists have shown something surprising: the formation of Cooper pairs can not only help electric current to flow but it can also block that current. Their research appears in Science.
News Release   07-067    11/22/2007   Lawton
Optic Flow: A Step in The Right Direction
The way objects appear to stream by us as we move through the world is a phenomenon called optic flow. Think of the street signs and storefronts that sail across the car windshield as we drive. That’s optic flow in action. Brown University cognitive scientists have now shown, in research to be featured on the cover of Current Biology, that optic flow plays a critical role in continuously recalibrating our steps as we walk.
News Release   07-065    11/15/2007   Lawton
Brown University Contributes $50,000 to R.I. WWII Memorial
Brown University has announced a contribution of $50,000 to support the Rhode Island World War II Memorial. The memorial is to be dedicated Veterans Day, Sunday Nov.11, 2007.
News Release   07-064    11/10/2007   de Ramel
Two Brown Scientists Receive Top White House Awards
Two Brown professors have garnered the highest honors given by the U.S. government to scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. Odest Chadwicke (Chad) Jenkins, assistant professor of computer science, and Pradeep Guduru, assistant professor of engineering, received Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) during a ceremony at the White House.
News Release   07-063    11/09/2007   Kidwell
Brown Biologists Assemble Fly mtDNA for Landmark Genome Project
As part of a major new international genome sequencing project, Brown biologists assembled the complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of seven different species of fruit fly. Their work, published in Nature, provides scientists with an exciting new tool to understand the genetic differences within a species as well as the evolutionary relationships among different species.
News Release   07-062    11/07/2007   Lawton
First-Ever Study: Lack of Critical Lubricant Causes Wear in Joints
For the first time, researchers have linked increased friction with early wear in the joints of animals. Work led by Brown University physician and engineer Gregory Jay, M.D., shows mice that do not produce the protein lubricin begin to show wear in their joints less than two weeks after birth. This finding not only points up the protective power of lubricin but also suggests that it could be used to prevent joint wear after an injury.
News Release   07-061    11/05/2007   Lawton
Pianist Saleem Abboud Ashkar to Perform, Lead Master Class at Brown
Renowned Palestinian-Israeli pianist Saleem Abboud Ashkar will visit Brown University Nov. 9-11, 2007. In addition to presenting a piano recital and offering a workshop for Brown students, Abboud Ashkar will participate in a panel discussion focusing on the role of the humanities in bridging cultural differences on an international level.
News Release   07-059    10/29/2007   Baum
Three Brown Faculty Elected to World's Largest Scientific Society
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has elected three Brown University professors – Mary Carskadon, Stephen McGarvey and Carle Pieters – fellows for their significant contributions to the life and physical sciences.
News Release   07-057    10/25/2007   Lawton
Brown Ranked as Top School for Producing Fulbright Students
Brown ranks number three in the nation among colleges and universities producing the highest number of Fulbright students. Twenty-five undergraduate and graduate students were named Fulbright Fellows in 2007-2008, also giving Brown the top-ranked rate in the Ivy League.
News Release   07-056    10/24/2007   Baum
KIDS Photography Exhibition on Display at the Bell Gallery
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present KIDS, an exhibition of photographs of children by Julie Blackmon, Jill Greenberg, and Ruud van Empel, from Saturday, Nov. 3 through Friday, Dec. 21, 2007. An opening reception and gallery talk will be held on Friday, Nov. 2, at 5:30 p.m. The exhibition and opening event are free and open to the public.
News Release   07-055    10/17/2007   Baum
Brown Corporation Meets, Approves New Projects
The Corporation of Brown University has appointed David Kennedy as the University’s first vice president for international affairs. Brown’s governing body also reviewed University leadership reports, faculty hiring, international education, and the state of undergraduate education. The Corporation formally accepted gifts, approved professorships, and received the first allocation to The Fund for the Education of the Children of Providence.
News Release   07-052    10/13/2007   de Ramel
Providence Residents Favor Living Wage, Higher Minimum Wage
A new survey conducted by the Taubman Center for Public Policy finds that Providence residents favor a “living wage” and an increase in the minimum wage. The survey was undertaken in conjunction with the eighth annual Thomas J. Anton/Frederick Lippitt Urban Affairs Conference on “The Living Wage,” scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2007, at Brown.
News Release   07-050    10/12/2007   Baum
Professor-at-Large Richard Holbrooke to Discuss 'The World Crisis'
Brown University Professor-at-Large Richard C. Holbrooke ’62 will deliver a lecture titled “The World Crisis” on Monday, Oct. 15, 2007, at 4:30 p.m. in Salomon Center for Teaching. He will sign copies of his new book, To End a War, beginning at 3:45 p.m. in the lobby. The event is part of The Directors Lectures Series on Contemporary International Affairs sponsored by the Watson Institute for International Studies.
News Release   07-049    10/11/2007   Baum
Four Brown Faculty Inducted as AAAS Fellows
Engineers Alan Needleman and Arto Nurmikko, physicist J. Michael Kosterlitz, and ecologist Jerry M. Melillo have been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction of excellence in science, scholarship, business, public affairs and the arts. Needleman, Nurmikko and Kosterlitz are professors at Brown; Melillo is a researcher at the Marine Biological Laboratory who holds a joint appointment at Brown through the Brown-MBL Graduate Program in Biological and Environmental Sciences.
News Release   07-047    10/06/2007   de Ramel
Presidents Cardoso and Lagos Headline 'Year of Focus on Latin America'
Brown University Professors-at-Large Fernando Henrique Cardoso, former president of Brazil, and Ricardo Lagos, former president of Chile, will deliver the inaugural Lecture on Globalization and Inequality, sponsored by the Watson Institute for International Studies, on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2007. The event is a focal point in a year of University lectures, exhibitions, events, and film series with a focus on Latin American issues.
News Release   07-042    09/28/2007   Baum
Brown Bat Flight Team Wins NSF/Science Visualization Award
A multidisciplinary team of Brown faculty and students has won a first-place award in the International Science and Technology Visualization Challenge sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Science, the journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Their winning entry, on the balletic flight of bats, appears in Science.
News Release   07-044    09/27/2007   Lawton
Brown, Princeton to Enhance Partnership with Dillard University
At the 2007 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting in New York City, Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons announced that Brown and Princeton University would extend and enhance their post-Katrina partnership with Dillard University in New Orleans.
News Release   07-043    09/27/2007   Nickel
23 Faculty Appointed to Endowed and Named Professorships
Brown University has appointed 23 current faculty members to endowed and named professorships, including three new Royce Professors in Teaching Excellence. The appointments are part the University’s ongoing commitment to recruit and retain the highest-caliber faculty for Brown, a key goal under the Plan for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   07-041    09/25/2007   Baum
The Garibaldi Panorama: Brown to Digitize 19th-Century Relic
Brown University Library and the Department of Italian Studies are collaborating to bring one of the finest surviving examples of panoramic art, the Garibaldi Panorama, back to the public eye. Measuring 273 feet long, the double-sided watercolor is one of the longest paintings in the world and all of it will soon be available online to scholars and students.
News Release   07-038    09/24/2007   Baum
Study: Children of Immigrants Form Ethnic Identity at Early Age
Brown University researchers have published the one of the first longitudinal studies demonstrating that children of first-generation immigrants develop their ethnic identity at an earlier age than previous research has shown. Additionally, a child’s positive sense of ethnic identity is associated with the desire to socialize with children of various racial and ethnic backgrounds. The research is published in The International Journal of Behavioral Development.
News Release   07-039    09/24/2007   Baum
Extraterrestrial Impact Likely Source of Sudden Ice Age Extinctions
What killed the wooly mammoths? An international team of scientists, including Peter Schultz of Brown University, suggests that a comet or meteorite exploded over the planet roughly 12,900 years ago, causing the abrupt climate changes that led to the extinction of the wooly mammoth and other giant prehistoric beasts. Their theory is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   07-040    09/24/2007   Lawton
McCaffrey to Address 'After Iraq: How the World has Changed'
Retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey will deliver the 77th Stephen A. Ogden Jr. ’60 Memorial Lecture on International Affairs on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2007. His lecture, titled “After Iraq: How the World has Changed,” begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-036    09/20/2007   Baum
Key to Longer Life (in Flies) Lies in Just 14 Brain Cells
Fruit flies live significantly longer when the activity of the protein p53 is reduced in just 14 insulin-producing cells in their brains, new Brown University research shows. The results put scientists one step closer to understanding caloric restriction, a biochemical process proven to slow aging. Results appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   07-037    09/20/2007   Lawton
Brown Scientists Take the Petri Dish to New Dimensions
Brown University biomedical engineers have created a new method for growing cells in three dimensions rather than the traditional two. This 3-D Petri dish allows cells to self-assemble, creating cell clusters that can be transplanted in the body or used to test drugs in the lab. This simple new technique is part of a growing body of research that shows that 3-D culture techniques can create cells that behave more like cells in the body.
News Release   07-035    09/19/2007   Lawton
Bone-Growing Nanomaterial Shows Promise for Orthopaedic Implants
Bone-forming cells grow faster and produce more calcium on anodized titanium covered in carbon nanotubes compared with plain anodized titanium and the non-anodized version currently used in orthopaedic implants, new Brown University research shows. The work, published in Nanotechnology, uncovers a new material that can be used to make more successful implants. The research also shows tantalizing promise for an all-new device: a “smart” implant that can sense and report on bone growth.
News Release   07-033    09/17/2007   Lawton
Brown and RISD Presidents To Formalize Dual Degree Program
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) President Roger Mandle will sign a memorandum of understanding, formalizing the Brown-RISD dual degree program. The ceremony, including remarks from each president, begins at 12:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, 2007, in the University Club, 219 Benefit St. in Providence.
News Release   07-034    09/14/2007   Baum
Blacks Likelier Than Whites To Live in Poor-Quality Nursing Homes
New research led by Vincent Mor at Brown University shows that blacks are more likely than whites to live in poor-quality nursing homes in cities across the United States. The research, published in the September/October issue of Health Affairs, is the first to document the relationship between racial segregation and quality disparities in U.S. nursing homes.
News Release   07-030    09/11/2007   Lawton
R.I. Survey: Clinton Leads Obama in Democratic Presidential Field
A statewide survey of 571 registered Rhode Island voters conducted Sept. 8-9, 2007, shows Sen. Hillary Clinton with a significant lead over Sen. Barack Obama for the Democratic presidential nomination. The survey also finds a drop in the approval rating of Gov. Don Carcieri and a decline – to 31 percent from 50 percent in January – in the number of voters who believe the state is headed in the right direction.
News Release   07-031    09/10/2007   Baum
Brown Launches First-of-its-Kind Program in Barcelona
The Consortium for Advanced Studies in Barcelona, a collaborative initiative involving Brown, University of Chicago, Northwestern, Cornell, Harvard and Princeton, begins its inaugural year September 2007. As the first fully integrated higher education program in Barcelona, students will enroll directly in regular university classes at three distinguished Spanish universities.
News Release   07-029    09/06/2007   Baum
Recent Works by Walter Feldman on Display at Rockefeller Library
Celebrating the accomplishments of artist, scholar, and teacher Walter Feldman, Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library will host a special exhibition of Feldman’s work, including paintings, collages, sculptures and books. Recent Works by Walter Feldman runs from Saturday, Sept. 8, through Friday, Oct. 5, 2007. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-028    09/05/2007   Baum
Black Legislators More Active Than White Counterparts, Study Finds
Analyzing racial differences among legislators participating in select House committees in the 107th Congress (2001-2002), Brown University political scientist Katrina Gamble found that black representatives participate at a higher rate than their white counterparts on both black interest and nonracial bills. The findings are published in the current issue of Legislative Studies Quarterly.
News Release   07-025    08/30/2007   Baum
Brown Study Finds Link Between Depression and Household Mold
A groundbreaking public health study, led by Brown University epidemiologist Edmond Shenassa, has found a connection between damp, moldy homes and depression. Results are published in the American Journal of Public Health.
News Release   07-023    08/29/2007   Lawton
Mammoth 3-D Martian Images Featured in Innovative Exhibit
Giant images of Mars – viewed through 3-D glasses – take center stage in a new exhibit at the Museum of Natural History and Planetarium. The exhibition runs from Sept. 12 to Oct. 28, 2007, and is sponsored by the Brown/NASA Planetary Data Center and the NASA Rhode Island Space Grant Consortium, both based at Brown University. The exhibit will be the only U.S. museum showing of these riveting Red Planet images. Grab your glasses!
News Release   07-022    08/28/2007   Lawton
Brown Faculty and Grad Student Honored with ACLS Fellowships
Four members of the Brown University faculty and one graduate student have been awarded fellowships by the American Council of Learned Societies, a nonprofit organization advancing studies in the humanities and social sciences. Their projects range from an analysis of the cinematic close-up to an examination of the spatial transformation of post-apartheid South Africa.
News Release   07-024    08/28/2007   Baum
Brown Scientist John P. Donoghue Wins Major Neuroscience Award
John P. Donoghue, director of the Brain Science Program at Brown University, will receive the 2007 K.J. Zülch Prize for pioneering BrainGate, the mind-to-movement device that allows people with paralysis to control assistive devices using thoughts alone. The Gertrud Reemtsma Foundation – a science foundation administered by the Max Planck Society – bestows the Zülch Prize, Germany’s highest honor for basic neurological research.
News Release   07-021    08/20/2007   Lawton
With a Brown I.D., Ride RIPTA for Free
Soon, current faculty, students and staff at Brown will be able to swipe their University-issued identity cards and ride RIPTA for free, anytime, anywhere in the state. The new U-PASS program goes into effect Sept. 1, 2007. Brown University hopes to benefit employees and the community by reducing energy consumption, traffic and parking congestion on College Hill and statewide.
News Release   07-020    08/20/2007   de Ramel
Department of Public Safety Seeks National Reaccreditation
A team of assessors from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc. (CALEA) will arrive on campus Aug. 18, 2007, to examine all aspects of the Department of Public Safety’s (DPS) policies, procedures, management, operations and support services. Brown’s DPS is the only accredited Rhode Island campus police department and was the first Ivy League police service to receive this honor. A public hearing is scheduled for Aug. 20.
News Release   07-019    08/16/2007   de Ramel
Yumi Kori Creates Architectural Installation "Jukai" for Bell Gallery
The David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University presents Jukai, a site-specific architectural environment by Japanese artist Yumi Kori, from Saturday, Sept. 8, through Sunday, Oct. 21, 2007. Concurrently, Selections from the Permanent Collection will be on view in the List Art Center Lobby. The exhibitions and an opening reception on Friday, Sept. 7, 2007, are free and open to the public.
News Release   07-016    08/10/2007   Baum
Next-Generation Neurotechnology Possible With NIH Grant
Brown University, with research partners at Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems Inc. and the Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center, will develop new brain implants that record or stimulate neural activity – and help improve the lives of people with paralysis, epilepsy and other central nervous system injuries and disorders. The work is made possible with a $6.5-million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
News Release   07-015    08/02/2007   Lawton
Researchers Learn Why Immune System Watch Dogs Start to Howl
A class of proteins known as toll-like receptors are the guard dogs of the immune system, sniffing out bacteria or viruses then rousing the rest of the immune system for attack. Because of their ability to activate the body’s defenses, toll-like receptors are a darling of drug developers. New research led by Brown University immunologist Wen-Ming Chu, M.D., identifies what protein alerts toll-like receptor 9, one of the most powerful guard dogs in the pack.
News Release   07-014    08/02/2007   Lawton
Delaware and Michigan Are Best States for American e-Government
Brown University’s eighth annual analysis of U.S. e-government finds Delaware and Michigan leading all states in effective governmental use of Web-based technology. ‘USA.gov’ and the Department of Agriculture lead federal offices.
News Release   07-010    07/24/2007   Baum
On the Move: Historic House Relocates to Make Way for The Walk
Brown University’s Peter Green House, currently located at 142 Angell St., will be moved in one piece beginning Tuesday, July 31, and land in its new home, 79 Brown St., by Friday, Aug. 3, 2007. The relocation marks the University’s first step in implementing “The Walk” project, a series of linked green spaces and walkways that will provide a connection between the University’s historic main campus and the Pembroke Campus.
News Release   07-012    07/24/2007   Baum
Brown and RISD Announce Dual Degree Program
Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) announce the establishment of a dual-degree program, a five-year program that offers students the opportunity to be awarded a Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) from Brown and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree from RISD. The program will enable students to explore the integration of a wide range of disciplines by combining the rigorous degree requirements of both institutions.
News Release   07-013    07/24/2007   Baum
Donors and Dollars Set New Fund-Raising Records in FY 2007
Brown University announced a series of fund-raising results that set new records in numerous categories. Contributions to the Brown Annual Fund, Brown University Sports Foundation, and Brown Medical School Annual Fund, all reached historic highs. The Campaign for Academic Enrichment exceeded the $1-billion mark as it climbs within reach of the $1.4-billion goal, the largest in Brown’s history.
News Release   07-009    07/23/2007   Baum
Exhibition Commemorates 400th Anniversary of Jamestown, Va.
The John Carter Brown Library at Brown University commemorates the 400th anniversary of the first permanent English settlement in North America – Jamestown, Va. – with the new exhibition Jamestown Matters. It will be on display through September 2007 and is free and open to the public.
News Release   07-008    07/18/2007   Baum
Plasmonics: On a Wire or in a Fiber, a Wave is a Wave
Around the world, students learn about the wave nature of light through the interference patterns of “Young’s double-slit experiment,” first performed more than 200 years ago and still considered among the most beautiful physics experiments. Using an analogous experiment, researchers at Brown and Stanford have shown that a simple analytical model can describe the wave nature of surface plasmon polaritons. Their work suggests that plasmonic devices cannot easily circumvent the limitations of electromagnetic waves.
News Release   07-005    07/13/2007   Downs
Brown and Paris VI Launch Collaborative Degree Programs in Math
Following on a long history of informal collaboration and exchange, the math departments at Brown University and the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI) are launching a formal academic affiliation. The new collaborative program will immerse graduate students in a different scientific culture as they travel from their home institution to complete three semesters of their graduate work at the host institution. Both institutions will be recognized on students’ diplomas.
News Release   07-004    07/12/2007   Downs
What's In Your Microcapsule? Tattoo Ink -- and More
Brown University and Freedom-2, a New York City company developing inks to make safe, durable but removable tattoos, have reached a licensing agreement that gives Freedom-2 the rights to use the microencapsulation process perfected in the laboratory of Edith Mathiowitz for the purposes of making tattoo ink. But Mathiowitz’s technique for coating particles in polymers has plenty of uses outside the tattoo parlor.
News Release   07-002    07/09/2007   Lawton
Brown Creates Commission to Commemorate History of R.I. Slavery
A 10-member Commission to Commemorate the History of Slavery in Rhode Island established by Brown University in cooperation with the City of Providence and State of Rhode Island, is charged with developing ideas for how best to acknowledge the University and community’s historical relationship to slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.
News Release   07-001    07/01/2007   Baum
Summer Institute to Study Accountability, Reform in Urban Schools
Teams of teachers and administrators from the Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee and Providence school systems will gather at Brown University this summer to learn how to effectively use classroom data and test scores to guide instructional policy and student achievement. Brown’s Urban Education Policy Program will host the weeklong inaugural Institute on Data-Driven Decision Making in Urban School Systems.
News Release   06-183    06/29/2007   Baum
Brown Artist Creates Vietnam-Era Protest Speech Re-enactments
Exploring the parallels between the war in Iraq and the Vietnam War, artist Mark Tribe will stage re-enactments of Vietnam-era protest speeches in Boston and Washington, D.C. in July. The events are part of Tribe’s Port Huron Project, a series of re-enactments of protest speeches from the New Left movements of the 1960s and ’70s.
News Release   06-181    06/27/2007   Baum
Brown University Library Acquires Collection of David E. Pingree
The Brown University Library has acquired the library of the late David E. Pingree, an internationally renowned scholar of the history of mathematics. The collection, consisting of more than 22,000 materials, is a remarkable resource for the study of mathematics in the ancient world, in particular India, and the relationship of Eastern mathematics to the development of mathematics and related disciplines in the West.
News Release   06-180    06/26/2007   Baum
Shifting Weather Patterns Drove Miocene Grassland Expansion
An 11-million year sediment record from the Arabian Sea provides evidence that changing weather patterns – rather than declining carbon dioxide levels – drove grassland expansion in the tropics and subtropics over the last 10 million years. Brown University geologists based their findings on variations in carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios from specific leaf wax compounds.
News Release   06-178    06/13/2007   Downs
Study Shows Pre-Op Hematocrit Affects Post-Op Outcomes
Elderly men with even slightly abnormal red blood cell counts have a higher risk of dying or having a serious cardiac event after major surgery, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Results are published in JAMA.
News Release   06-177    06/12/2007   Lawton
Highway System Drives City Population Declines, Says Brown Economist
Examining the phenomenon of suburbanization in America, Brown University economist Nathaniel Baum-Snow shows the extent to which the construction of new highways contributed to population declines in cities. He estimates that each new highway passing through a city reduces its population by about 18 percent, making the national road network a major impetus for suburbanization and sprawl of U.S. cities. His findings are published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics.
News Release   06-176    06/11/2007   Baum
Researchers Catch Motion of a Single Electron on Video
Using pulses of high-intensity sound, two Brown University physicists have succeeded in making a movie showing the motion of a single electron. Humphrey Maris, a physics professor at Brown University, and Wei Guo, a Brown doctoral student, were able to film the electron as it moved through a container of superfluid helium.
News Release   06-174    06/05/2007   Downs
Study: Directly Observed HIV Therapy For Children Is Promising
The first study in the developing world of directly observed antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected children shows this form of treatment is an inexpensive, effective way to ensure that children take life-saving medications. Researchers at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, together with Maryknoll, the international Catholic charity, conducted the study. Results are published in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health.
News Release   06-175    05/31/2007   Lawton
Chancellor Stephen Robert Receives Faculty's Highest Honor
During Brown University’s Commencement exercises Sunday, May 27, 2007, outgoing Chancellor Stephen Robert, a member of the Brown Class of 1962, received the Brown faculty’s highest honor, the Susan Colver Rosenberger Medal.
News Release   06-173    05/27/2007   Baum
Celebrating Success: Fundraising, Facilities, Faculty
The Corporation of Brown University celebrates a milestone for Boldly Brown: The Campaign for Academic Enrichment; elects new trustees; votes to initiate planning and design for a new swimming and diving facility; establishes new research centers in science and international economics; establishes new professorships; improves the faculty sabbatical policy; and accepts more than $18 million in gifts, among other actions.
News Release   06-171    05/25/2007   de Ramel
StoryCorps National Oral History Project to Record Rhode Islanders
StoryCorps, a national oral history and storytelling project, will stop in Providence June 7–30, 2007, to record the voices and stories of Rhode Islanders. Their traveling studio – the StoryBooth – will be located in the park at Kennedy Plaza in downtown Providence. The public is invited to make reservations.
News Release   06-170    05/24/2007   Baum
Emily Underwood and Justin Fabrikant To Deliver Senior Orations
Emily Underwood of Coloma, Calif., and Justin Fabrikant of Santa Cruz, Calif., will deliver senior orations to their classmates on Sunday, May 27, 2007, at 12:50 p.m. on The College Green. Underwood’s address is titled “Holding Ground” and Fabrikant’s is titled “The Evolution of the Brown Student.”
News Release   06-169    05/23/2007   de Ramel
The Promise and Policy Implications of Personalized Medicine
Personalized medicine, which uses individual genetic information to prevent, diagnose or treat disease, will be the topic of a June 4, 2007, conference sponsored by the Division of Biology and Medicine at Brown University, Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy (D-RI), and Lifespan. The conference will feature a keynote address by genomics pioneer Francis S. Collins.
News Release   06-164    05/21/2007   Lawton
Former Chilean President Lagos Appointed Professor-at-Large
Ricardo Lagos Escobar, former President of Chile, has been appointed as professor-at-large at Brown University. His new position begins July 1, 2007.
News Release   06-162    05/18/2007   Baum
Bell Gallery Presents "Natured Anew: reflections of the natural world"
The David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University will present Natured Anew: reflections of the natural world from Saturday, June 9, though Sunday, July 8, 2007, featuring five artists who produce works that are inspired by or comment on nature. The exhibition and an opening reception on Friday, June 8, are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-161    05/17/2007   Baum
Brown Library Launches Digital Archive of Military Collection
Thousands of prints, watercolors, and drawings from the Anne S.K. Brown Military Collection are now available online from the Brown University Library. The newly launched digital archive is part of an ambitious, multiyear endeavor that will digitize 15,000 individual works in the collection. The Anne S.K. Brown Military Collection is the foremost American collection devoted to the history and iconography of soldiers and soldiering, and one of the world’s largest devoted to the study of military and naval uniforms.
News Release   06-160    05/16/2007   Baum
Medical School Pioneer Stanley Aronson To Address M.D. Graduates
Stanley M. Aronson, M.D., founding dean of Brown’s medical school, will address the 33rd graduating class of The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University on Sunday, May 27, 2007, in the First Unitarian Church. Surena Namdari, a candidate for the M.D. degree, will deliver the student address. Dean of Medicine and Biological Sciences Eli Y. Adashi, M.D., will preside.
News Release   06-159    05/16/2007   Lawton
Growing Nerve Cells in 3-D Dramatically Affects Gene Expression
Nerve cells grown in three-dimensional environments deploy hundreds of different genes compared with cells grown in standard two-dimensional petri dishes, according to a new Brown University study. The research, spearheaded by bioengineer Diane Hoffman-Kim, adds to a growing body of evidence that lab culture techniques dramatically affect the way these cells behave.
News Release   06-156    05/15/2007   Lawton
Simple Equations Track Listeria Trails
A simple and robust mathematical description of the movement of Listeria monocytogenes yields insights into the mechanisms that drive this pathogenic bacterium. Vivek Shenoy, associate professor of engineering at Brown University, and Julie Theriot, associate professor at Stanford University, published the equations in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   06-155    05/11/2007   Downs
Overview of Brown University's 239th Commencement, May 27
Chief Marshal Richard Canfield Barker, a 1957 alumnus, will lead more than 6,000 people down College Hill on Sunday, May 27, 2007, in one of the nation’s largest and most colorful academic pageants. The procession and academic exercises will cap a three-day Commencement/Reunion Weekend on the Brown campus. Brown University’s 239th Commencement will follow a relatively new plan for the second time in its history. Due in part to the large sizes of recent classes, graduates will assemble on the grounds of the First Baptist Church in America, rather than inside.
News Release   06-153    05/08/2007   de Ramel
Brown, Texas Instruments Bring Graphing Calculators to Hope High
A new educational partnership between Hope High School, Brown University, and Texas Instruments is bringing a fresh perspective to the study of lines, shapes, formulas, and trajectories that makes up high school algebra. The collaboration, which will provide access to graphing calculators for every ninth-grade algebra student at Hope High School, aims to improve student engagement and achievement in math.
News Release   06-152    05/08/2007   Downs
David Gottlieb Elected to National Academy of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences has elected David Gottlieb, professor of applied mathematics at Brown University, to become a member of the society of distinguished scholars. Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors that can be accorded a scientist or engineer. Gottlieb’s research focus is numerical analysis and methods of finding more accurate solutions for partial differential equations, with applications in aerodynamics and meteorology.
News Release   06-151    05/04/2007   Downs
Four Brown Faculty Elected to Fellowship in AAAS
Engineers Alan Needleman and Arto Nurmikko, physicist J. Michael Kosterlitz, and ecologist Jerry M. Melillo have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction of excellence in science, scholarship, business, public affairs and the arts. Needleman, Nurmikko and Kosterlitz are professors at Brown; Melillo is a researcher at the Marine Biological Laboratory who holds a joint appointment at Brown through the Brown-MBL Graduate Program in Biological and Environmental Sciences.
News Release   06-150    05/02/2007   Downs
Liquid CO2 Drives Rapid Thrust of Diamond-Bearing Structures
In the May 3 issue of Nature, James Head, a Brown University professor of geology and Lionel Wilson, a professor of volcanology at the University of Lancaster, propose an integrated and dramatic mechanism for the formation of kimberlites, the enigmatic structures bearing most of the world’s diamonds. Their theory explains many puzzling features of the formations and also suggests that the location of kimberlites is not related to near-surface geology.
News Release   06-148    05/02/2007   Downs
Bracero History Project Receives Grant To Establish Online Archive
The Bracero History Project, led in part by Brown University’s Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, has received a $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The funds will support the development of a collaborative, bilingual, online archive documenting the Bracero Program, which brought millions of Mexican guest workers to the United States between 1942 and 1964. The Bracero History Archive will be the largest, most comprehensive clearinghouse of its kind.
News Release   06-149    05/01/2007   Baum
Smith Swim Center Update: Reopening the Facility Is Not Feasible
University officials and consultants have determined that the Smith Swim Center, closed since mid-February, will not be reopened due to serious and irreversible deterioration in the strength of the heavy timbers that support the roof structure. Russell C. Carey, interim vice president for campus life and student services, and Michael Goldberger, director of athletics, sent the following message to individuals and groups that have used the facility.
News Release   06-147    04/27/2007   Baum
Morphine Makes Lasting -- and Surprising -- Change in the Brain
Morphine stops the synapse-strengthening process in the brain known as long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses, according to new research conducted by Brown University brain scientist Julie Kauer. In Nature, Kauer explains this startlingly persistent effect, which could contribute to addiction and may provide a target for treatments of opioid addiction. The research also supports a provocative theory of addiction as a disease of learning and memory.
News Release   06-144    04/25/2007   Lawton
Brown University to Confer Nine Honorary Degrees May 27
Brown will confer nine honorary degrees at Commencement: Stanley Aronson, M.D., founding dean of Brown’s medical school; sportscaster Chris Berman ’77; actress Kate Burton ’79; blues legend B.B. King; Nobel laureate Craig Mello ’82; human rights activist Samantha Power; and three university presidents who are leading their schools through Hurricane Katrina recovery: Scott Cowen of Tulane, Norman Francis of Xavier, and Marvalene Hughes of Dillard.
News Release   06-142    04/25/2007   Baum
Brown To Hold Symposium, Host Exhibition on HIV and Women
In photographs, speeches and scientific talks, the global impact of the AIDS pandemic on women will be explored in a weekend of events held at Brown University May 4-6, 2007. Speakers, including Pauline Muchina, senior women and AIDS advocacy officer with UNAIDS, will discuss prevention barriers and strategies. Events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-146    04/25/2007   Lawton
Craig C. Mello '82 Will Deliver Baccalaureate Address on May 26
Nobel Prize-winning biochemical researcher Craig Mello will deliver the baccalaureate address to Brown University’s graduating seniors on Saturday, May 26, 2007, at 3 p.m. in the First Baptist Church in America. Mello, a 1982 Brown graduate, shared the 2006 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery of RNA interference, a powerful mechanism for controlling the expression of genetic information.
News Release   06-145    04/24/2007   Downs
Modernist Journals Project Has Grant to Digitize Rare Magazines
The Modernist Journals Project, a joint effort by Brown University and the University of Tulsa, has been awarded a $332,823 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to expand its digital archive of rare periodicals.
News Release   06-143    04/19/2007   Baum
A Message About Community Safety and Security
Senior administrators at Brown University distributed a campuswide e-mail today, describing the University’s policies and preparedness for emergency situations. The text of that message follows here.
News Release   06-141    04/18/2007   de Ramel
Biologists Prove Critical Step in Membrane Fusion
Brown University biologists have, for the first time, observed a critical step in membrane fusion, the process that allows for fertilization, viral infection and nerve cell communication. The research, reported in Developmental Cell, sheds new light on this essential biological process.
News Release   06-138    04/17/2007   Lawton
Brown Playwrights Premiere Work at New Plays Festival Part Two
New productions by two M.F.A. candidate playwrights will be featured in part two of the 25th annual New Plays Festival, presented by the Brown University Literary Arts Program and the Brown/Trinity Repertory Consortium. The festival runs from Thursday, April 19, through Sunday, April 22, 2007, at the Pell Chafee Performance Center. All performances are free and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.
News Release   06-139    04/17/2007   Baum
Journalist David Maraniss to Discuss "The Mythology of Sport"
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author David Maraniss will deliver the seventh annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture at Brown University on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. His talk, titled “The Mythology of Sport,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-133    04/09/2007   Baum
Nanotextured Implant Materials: Blending in, Not Fighting Back

Texture turns out to be nearly as important as chemistry when designing materials for use in the human body. In two related experiments Brown University engineers Thomas Webster and Karen Haberstroh found that cells responded differently to materials with identical chemistry but different surface textures. On both titanium and polymer materials, nanoscale surface textures yielded a more natural, accepting response, while microscale patterns typical of engineered materials spurred a rejection response.

News Release   06-134    04/09/2007   Downs
New England Journal of Medicine Chief to Lecture in Providence
Jeffrey M. Drazen, M.D., editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, will deliver lectures at Rhode Island Hospital and at Brown University on Wednesday, April 18, 2007. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Alpha Omega Alpha, the medical student honor society, are sponsoring the talks, which are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-135    04/09/2007   Lawton
E-Activism: Analysis of Black Bloggers in the Blogosphere
In the first scholarly research examining the role of black bloggers, Brown University’s Antoinette Pole found that bloggers of color are using this burgeoning medium to encourage political participation and activism. She also found that black bloggers do not feel discriminated against or excluded by other bloggers. Her findings appear in the International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society.
News Release   06-130    04/05/2007   Baum
Slick and Springy: Brown Research Reveals Protein's Role in Joints
Experiments led by Brown University physician and engineer Gregory Jay, M.D., show a new role that the protein lubricin plays in synovial fluid – the slimy stuff jammed in joints. Lubricin, the team found, not only reduces friction but also boosts resiliency in joints. Results of the research, appearing on-line in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may lead to new treatments for arthritis.
News Release   06-131    04/05/2007   Lawton
Symposium Marks 50 Years of BCS Theory of Superconductivity
Five Nobel Prize-winning physicists join the chief technology officer of American Superconductor and other researchers to discuss the nature of superconductivity, its broad scientific utility and current applications to energy transmission, transportation and computing. Public lectures and a panel discussion on Thursday, April 12, the first day of the symposium, will help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the BCS theory of superconductivity.
News Release   06-129    04/04/2007   Downs
Brown Hosts Stars and Students for 2007 Ivy Film Festival
Student filmmakers and film industry professionals will come together for the 2007 Ivy Film Festival at Brown University April 11-15, 2007. The festival will showcase 36 student films and include advance screenings of four feature films. Director Doug Liman and writer Simon Kinberg will give the keynote address Saturday, April 14. All events are open to the public.
News Release   06-128    04/03/2007   Baum
El Salvadoran Vice President de Escobar to Speak at Brown
Ana Vilma Albanez de Escobar, the first female vice president of the Republic of El Salvador, will deliver a lecture at Brown University on Tuesday, April 10, 2007. Her address, titled “El Salvador: A Country of Opportunities,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. in Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-124    04/02/2007   Baum
"Urban Landscapes" on Display at the Bell Gallery
This spring, the Bell Gallery presents a group exhibition Urban Landscapes ... emancipation and nostalgia ..., featuring works by British artist Catherine Yass, New York-based artist Sze Tsung Leong, and German artist Sabine Hornig. An opening reception and artist lecture will be held on Thursday, April 19, 2007. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-125    04/02/2007   Baum
Harvey Pekar Headlines Opening of "The SDS Comic Show"
Graphic depictions of the true-life stories of radical 1960s student activists will be on display at Brown University as the John Nicholas Brown Center for the Study of American Civilization presents The SDS Comic Show exhibition from Friday, April 13, through Friday, June 1, 2007. Author Harvey Pekar will deliver a keynote lecture preceding the opening reception. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-126    04/02/2007   Baum
Nation's High School Students Take Their Message to State Capitols
By the end of the current school year, high school students in eight states will have visited their state capitols to present their opinions on global issues directly to elected officials and civic leaders. These state house visits are part of the ninth annual Capitol Forum on America’s Future, an initiative of the Choices Program at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies.
News Release   06-123    03/30/2007   de Ramel
Troy Duster Explores Biology and Race at Annual Barnes Lecture
Troy Duster, a leading voice on the issues raised by genomic research and race, delivers the Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes Jr. Lecture in Public Health on Wednesday, April 11, 2007. The free lecture begins at 4 .p.m in Andrews Hall and is open to the public.
News Release   06-122    03/29/2007   Lawton
MRI Detects Most Missed Opposite Breast Cancers in Women
When added to a medical workup after a breast cancer diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can significantly improve the chances of detecting cancer in the opposite breast, according to clinical trial results reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network, whose biostatistics center is based at Brown University, conducted the study, funded by The National Cancer Institute.
News Release   06-120    03/28/2007   Lawton
Venezuelan Ambassador Alvarez Herrera to Speak at Brown
Bernardo Alvarez Herrera, Venezuela’s ambassador to the United States, will visit Brown University to deliver a lecture on U.S.–Venezuelan diplomatic relations. His lecture will be held on Wednesday, April 4, 2007, at 7 p.m. in MacMillan Hall, Room 117. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-121    03/27/2007   Baum
Robert A.M. Stern to Design Jonathan Nelson Fitness Center
Plans are underway for the construction of Brown University’s new Jonathan Nelson Fitness Center. A $45-million project, the 65,000-square-foot center will be designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects and will transform the University’s fitness and recreation offerings. The center is slated to open in 2010.
News Release   06-119    03/16/2007   Baum
Chromium 6: A Killer Compound With An Improbable Trigger
Chromium 6, the cancer-causing compound that sparked the legal crusade by Erin Brockovich, can be toxic in tiny doses. Brown University scientists have uncovered the unlikely culprit: vitamin C. In new research, the Brown team shows that when vitamin C reacts with even low doses of chromium 6 inside human cells, it creates high levels of cancer-causing DNA damage and mutations.
News Release   06-115    03/12/2007   Lawton
Former Brazil President Cardoso to Discuss Brazil's Evolving Role
Fernando Henrique Cardoso, the former Brazilian president and Brown professor-at-large, will give a lecture titled “Brazil: A Latin American Nation?” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 14, 2007, in MacMillan Hall’s Starr Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-116    03/12/2007   de Ramel
NSF Grant Expands Brown Collaboration with Providence School
Brown University has received $3 million from the National Science Foundation to help enrich science programs in Providence schools. The grant will support fellowships for physics, geology and engineering graduate students to lead after-school activities in six area high schools and classroom activities in three elementary schools. The hands-on, inquiry-based lessons will supplement the existing curriculum.
News Release   06-114    03/07/2007   Downs
Brown Scientists Explain Inception of Perception In The Brain
All of human sensation – sight, sound, taste – begins in the brain when information moves from the thalamus to the neocortex. In Nature Neuroscience, Brown University researchers explain how cortical cells get activated during this critical transfer. The findings shed light on the inner workings of the cortex, the biggest part of the brain, and may help explain some forms of irregular electrical brain activity such as epileptic seizures.
News Release   06-112    03/04/2007   Lawton
"Pulp Uncovered" Festival Explores Controversial Roots of Pop Icons
Brown University’s Public Humanities Program hosts Pulp Uncovered, a community festival celebrating the impact and legacy of pulp fiction magazines, from Thursday, March 15, through Sunday, March 18, 2007. The festival includes a film series, guest speakers, an exhibition at the John Nicholas Brown Center, and other community events. All events are open to the public.
News Release   06-111    03/02/2007   Baum
Novelist Jamaica Kincaid to Deliver Convocation Address
Celebrated author Jamaica Kincaid will deliver the keynote address at Brown University’s Caribbean Heritage Week Convocation Monday, March 5, 2007, at 6 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. A pre-convocation reception and book signing will be held at the Third World Center beginning at 5 p.m. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-110    03/01/2007   Baum
Corporation Approves 6.4% Budget Increase, Sets Tuition and Fees
The Corporation of Brown University has approved a fiscal year 2008 consolidated budget of $704.8 million, an 6.4-percent increase over FY07. Total undergraduate fees will rise 5.0 percent to $45,948, including a 5-percent rise in tuition to $35,584. The undergraduate financial aid budget will increase 10 percent over the University’s projected actual financial aid expenditures in the current year.
News Release   06-101    02/24/2007   de Ramel
Corporation Elects New Chancellor, Approves Response to Slavery and Justice, Sets Tuition and Budget , Creates Social Choice Fund, Accepts Gifts
The Corporation of Brown University has appointed a new chancellor, endorsed President Ruth J. Simmons’ response to the Committee on Slavery and Justice, and set tuition and budget for fiscal year 2008. The governing body of the University also discussed the future of The Warren Alpert Medical School, and the Division of Biology and Medicine. The Corporation established a new option for donors – the Social Choice Fund – and reported major progress in its Boldly Brown: Campaign for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   06-103    02/24/2007   de Ramel
Rhodes Gift Establishes Center for International Economics
A $10-million gift from Brown alumnus and trustee emeritus William R. Rhodes will fund a new professorship and Center for International Economics to expand the University’s teaching and research in international trade and finance.
News Release   06-106    02/24/2007   Baum
Brown Libraries Host Four Exhibitions on Slavery in the Americas
Four exhibitions currently on display at three Brown University Libraries offer the community a chance to view some of the original documents, journals, cargo invoices, newspaper advertisements and engravings cited in the Report of the Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice. The exhibitions, which document the history of African slavery and its impact on the Western Hemisphere, are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-108    02/24/2007   Baum
"Student Exhibition 2007" on Display at the Bell Gallery
Selected student artwork will be shown in the 27th annual student exhibition at the David Winton Bell Gallery from Saturday, March 17, through Sunday, April 1, 2007. An opening reception will be held Friday, March 16 at 7 p.m. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-105    02/22/2007   Baum
Events and Exhibit to Celebrate 70 Years of College Radio at Brown
From the dorm-room experiment that started it all, to the 1960s FM revolution, to the students behind the stations today – Brown is celebrating 70 years of college radio. The exhibit From Gaspipes to Websites: Radio at Brown 1936-2006 will be on display at the John Hay Library Feb. 21 through March 9, 2007. An opening reception featuring the launch of an audio documentary is planned for Sunday, Feb. 25, 2007, along with a panel discussion titled “The Importance of College Radio.” All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-100    02/15/2007   Baum
"Smart" Prosthetics Will Restore Independence To People With Disabilities
Neurotechnology has restored hearing to the deaf and someday will help the blind to see and the paralyzed to move again. In a Feb. 15, 2007, press briefing at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in San Francisco, Brown University neuroscientist John Donoghue explains how brain-computer interfaces are propelling these major leaps in rehabilitative medicine.
News Release   06-097    02/15/2007   Lawton
Migration Played Key Role in HIV Spread in South Africa
South Africa has one of the world’s highest rates of HIV infection. New research, led by Brown University professor Mark Lurie, shows that the movement of workers between urban and rural areas played a key role in the spread of the epidemic. Results are published in AIDS.
News Release   06-095    02/13/2007   Lawton
Brown University to Close Smith Swim Center
Brown University has closed Smith Swim Center as a precaution until the building’s original architect completes his analysis its roof system.
News Release   06-098    02/13/2007   Baum
Bank Supervision May Actually Drive Corruption, Says Economist
Traditional approaches to bank supervision may not be in the best interest of society, according to new research by a Brown University economist. In the first empirical assessment of the impact of international banking policies, Ross Levine, professor of economics, found that for most countries, regulations such as Basel II could actually hurt bank development and lead to greater corruption. The results are published in the Journal of Monetary Economics.
News Release   06-094    02/12/2007   Baum
Brown University Appoints Richard Holbrooke as Professor-at-Large
Richard C. Holbrooke, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and chief architect of the 1995 Dayton Accords ending the war in Bosnia, has accepted a five-year appointment as professor-at-large at Brown University.
News Release   06-090    02/07/2007   Baum
Brown Cancer Biologists Identify Major Player in Cell Growth
The transcription factor GABP – a member of a family of crucial gene-regulating proteins – is required to jump-start the process of cell division, according to research from The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital. The work, published in Nature Cell Biology, uncovers a new way to control cell growth and points up potential targets for cancer treatments.
News Release   06-093    02/06/2007   Lawton
Lincoln Chafee to Give Ogden Lecture on "Mideast Roadmaps"
Former U.S. Sen. Lincoln Chafee will deliver the Stephen A. Ogden Jr. ’60 Memorial Lecture on International Affairs during a Spring Forum on Monday, Feb. 12, 2007. His address, titled “Mideast Roadmaps: An Unkept Promise,” will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-092    02/01/2007   Baum
Brown Playwrights Premiere Work in 25th Annual New Plays Festival
New productions by three M.F.A. candidate playwrights will be featured in the 25th annual New Plays Festival, presented by the Brown University Literary Arts Program and the Brown/Trinity Repertory Consortium. The festival runs from Wednesday, Feb. 7, through Sunday, Feb. 11, 2007, in the McCormack Family Theatre. All performances are free and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.
News Release   06-089    01/31/2007   Baum
Nonie Darwish to Speak on Women's Rights in the Middle East
Author and activist Nonie Darwish will discuss women’s rights in the Middle East and the threat of Islamic fundamentalism at a lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007. Her talk, titled “The Road to Peace: Women’s Rights,” begins at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 001. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-086    01/29/2007   Baum
Brown Team Finds Crucial Protein Role in Deadly Prion Spread
Brown University biologists have made another major advance toward understanding the deadly work of prions, the culprits behind fatal brain diseases such as mad cow and their human counterparts. In new work published online in PLoS Biology, researchers show that the protein Hsp104 must be present and active for prions to multiply and cause disease.
News Release   06-084    01/23/2007   Lawton
Cornel West to Discuss the Life and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
Cornel West, among the nation’s most provocative public intellectuals, will deliver Brown University’s 11th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture on Friday, Feb. 2, 2007, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. His talk, titled “The Life and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.,” is free and open to the public.
News Release   06-085    01/23/2007   Baum
Sex, Love, and Rockets: The Comix World of Los Bros Hernandez
The John Nicholas Brown Center for the Study of American Civilization presents the story and work of two of the most widely acclaimed artists in the history of American comics –Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez. Sex, Love, and Rockets: The Comix World of Los Bros Hernandez will be on display from Feb. 5 through March 2, 2007. Jaime Hernandez will visit Brown to discuss his work at the opening reception. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-083    01/22/2007   Baum
Brown to Host Photojournalism Record of Life and Death in Darfur
Giant images of the escalating crisis in Sudan will be on display at Brown University as the traveling photojournalism exhibition Darfur/Darfur comes to Providence Jan. 26-27, 2007. Speakers at the opening forum include Mia Farrow, UNICEF’s goodwill ambassador; Frank Caprio, general treasurer of Rhode Island; Susannah Sirkin, deputy director of Physicians for Human Rights; and Eric Reeves, Sudan expert and researcher. The exhibition and forum are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-081    01/17/2007   Baum
One Size Does Not Fit All: A Strategy for Counterterrorism Policy
Hamas. Al-Qaeda. Lashkar-e-Taiba. Though bound by their Islamic identities, not all terrorist groups have the same agendas. The United States must improve its counterterrorism efforts by differentiating between the goals of ethnic and religious terrorist groups, according to global security analyst Justine A. Rosenthal, a visiting fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies. Her analysis is published in the journal The National Interest.
News Release   06-080    01/12/2007   Baum
Women Writers Project Wins NEH Grant for Digital Scholarship
The Brown University Women Writers Project has been awarded a $250,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support its work of bringing early women’s writing out of the archives and into the electronic age.
News Release   06-078    01/10/2007   Baum
Bell Gallery to Present Multimedia Show: "Faculty Exhibition 2007"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a multimedia showcase of artwork by members of the Brown faculty from Saturday, Jan, 27, through Sunday, March 4, 2007. Faculty Exhibition 2007 includes works in a wide range of media, from drawings and sculpture to computer animation and interactive web projects. A reception for the artists will be held Friday, Feb. 2, at 5:30 p.m. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-079    01/10/2007   Baum
Quesenberry To Lead Cancer Programs at Brown and Hospitals
Peter Quesenberry, M.D., has been appointed director of hematology and oncology at Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital and the Paul Calabresi Professor in Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Brown Medical School.
News Release   06-075    01/03/2007   Lawton
European Union Outpaces United States on Chemical Safety
New stricter European environmental policies may force even U.S.-based electronics makers to change their ways, say policy analysts at Brown University and Boston University. Stacy D. VanDeveer, a visiting fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies, and Henrik Selin, an assistant professor of international relations at Boston University, analyzed the controversial new policies in the December issue of the journal Environment.
News Release   06-074    01/02/2007   Downs
Genomic Variation Easier To Identify With UCSD/Brown Software
Computer scientists at the University of California–San Diego and Brown University have created a software system that more accurately detects “microinversions,” mutations that consist of tiny sequences of reversed DNA. The software gives biologists a powerful new tool to study genomic variation between and within species. The system is explained in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   06-073    12/22/2006   Lawton
Brown University Orchestra to Perform Concert Series in China
Seventy-one student musicians, eight concerts, six cities, 14 days – those numbers sum up the Brown University Orchestra’s China Tour 2006. The Brown ensemble will be the second American college orchestra to present a concert series in China. Its journey begins Sunday, Dec. 24, 2006.
News Release   06-072    12/22/2006   Baum
Sen. Lincoln Chafee Appointed Visiting Fellow at Brown University
U.S. Sen. Lincoln Chafee (R-R.I.) has accepted an appointment as distinguished visiting fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies. Chafee will begin the fellowship in January 2007, serving initially for the spring semester.
News Release   06-068    12/15/2006   Baum
Brown Awarded $2 Million to Expand Entrepreneurship Programs
Entrepreneurship education is about to get a boost at Brown. The University has been awarded a $2-million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to broaden entrepreneurship education, scholarship and activity across campus. The award is part of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative, which is providing a total of $35 million to colleges and universities across the country.
News Release   06-069    12/15/2006   Baum
Nursing Home or Hospital: State Policy Has Big Impact on Elderly
In a groundbreaking national study, Brown University researchers have traced the connections between state nursing home policies and resident hospitalizations rates. The team found that state policies unwittingly create financial incentives for nursing homes to hospitalize their frail elderly residents, even though hospital stays can be disorienting or dangerous. Results are published in Health Services Research.
News Release   06-067    12/13/2006   Lawton
Less Help at Home: Female Support for New Moms on the Decline
How is motherhood different than it was a century ago? In the past, live-in grandmothers, relatives, and other women were frequently available to assist with childcare. But times have changed. New research by Brown University sociologist Susan E. Short shows that today’s mothers with young children are getting substantially less help around the house. Even when other women are living in the household, they aren’t necessarily on hand to help with the kids. This research appears in Demography.
News Release   06-066    12/11/2006   Baum
Brown Scientists Map Structure of DNA-Doctoring Protein Complex
Mobile DNA, which inserts foreign genes into target cells, is a powerful force in the march of evolution and the spread of disease. Working with the lambda virus and E. coli bacteria, Brown University biologists have solved the structure of a six-protein complex critical to performing this gene-grafting surgery. The technique they developed could be used to reveal the structure of other critical protein complexes, landing the work on the cover of Molecular Cell.
News Release   06-064    12/06/2006   Lawton
Hotspots or Not? Isotopes Score One for Traditional Theory
New chemical evidence sheds light on the physical constraints of “hotspots” – locations where upwellings of Earth’s mantle material form seamounts and island chains. Although the existence of hotspots has been debated for the last 30 years, consistent data from uranium isotope decay series at eight island locations supports the idea that concentrated plumes of hot mantle material formed these islands.
News Release   06-065    12/06/2006   Downs
Brown and OTS will jointly manage new ILTER network secretariat
Ecological disturbance drives many pressing global concerns but is often measured at the local scale. A newly established secretariat for the International Long Term Ecological Research (ILTER) network will support long-term multiscale ecological data collection and analysis. The secretariat will be managed jointly by Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) in San José, Costa Rica.
News Release   06-062    12/04/2006   Downs
With Fruit Fly Sex, Researchers Find Mind-Body Connection
The fruit fly gene “doublesex” is responsible for ensuring that male flies look male and females look female. New Brown University research led by biologist Michael McKeown shows that doublesex not only helps shape bodies but also shapes behavior, acting with together with the gene “fruitless” to guide flies’ courtship routines and responses. The finding, published in Nature Genetics, shows that sexual development in flies – and, perhaps, in humans – is a more complicated proposition than previously thought.
News Release   06-063    11/30/2006   Lawton
Brown to Host Daniel Barenboim, West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
World-renowned conductor and pianist Daniel Barenboim and the young musicians of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra will visit Brown University from Thursday, Dec. 14, through Saturday, Dec. 16, 2006, for a series of conversations and workshops leading to a concert at VMA Arts and Cultural Center Saturday afternoon. All events are open to the public. A ticket is required for the concert, free of charge.
News Release   06-060    11/27/2006   Baum
Listening in on the birth pangs of Earth's crust
Geologist Donald Forsyth and students from Brown University on a routine ocean-floor mapping cruise jumped into action when they realized that many of the seafloor seismometers they were supposed to collect had been buried by a recent lava flow. Data from the remaining instruments yielded the first detailed record of seismic vibrations leading up to a seafloor spreading event, published this week in the journal Science.
News Release   06-058    11/23/2006   Downs
AAAS Names Miller Fellow for Science Education and Advocacy
The American Association for the Advancement of Science has elected Kenneth R. Miller, a Brown University professor of biology, a fellow for his leadership role in defending evolution and how it is taught in public schools as well as for his efforts to educate and encourage science teachers across the United States.
News Release   06-056    11/23/2006   Lawton
Brown University Senior Selected as 2007 Rhodes Scholar
Keriann Backus, a member of Brown University’s Class of 2007, has been chosen as a Rhodes Scholar. Backus will head to the University of Oxford next fall to pursue a doctorate in chemical biology.
News Release   06-057    11/20/2006   de Ramel
Brown Symposium Highlights Next Wave in Biology and Business
Biotech entrepreneur J. Craig Venter will speak at the 37th Annual Computer Science Department Industrial Partners Program Symposium held Dec. 6-8, 2006, at Brown University. The symposium, titled “The Genome and the Computational Sciences: The New Paradigms,” brings together experts from academia, business and government to discuss the biological challenges posed by genome sequencing and how those challenges can be met with computational techniques.
News Release   06-055    11/20/2006   Lawton
Speak, Memory: Research Challenges Theory of Memory Storage
During sleep, freshly minted memories move from the hippocampus, part of the “old” brain, to the neocortex, or “new” brain, for long-term storage. This has been the reigning theory for decades. Brown University research provides the strongest proof yet of this interaction between the old and new brains – and offers surprising evidence that challenges critical details of this theory of learning and memory. Results appear in Nature Neuroscience.
News Release   06-054    11/14/2006   Lawton
Sea Urchin Genome Is a Biology Boon and a Computational Feat
Now that the entire DNA map of the sea urchin is complete, it’s clear that these spiny sea creatures are even closer genetic cousins to humans than suspected. Brown University professors Gary Wessel and Sorin Istrail helped reveal the secrets of the urchin – from its powerful immune system to its formidable gene regulatory network – by identifying individual genes and creating the first high-resolution map of genes activated in its embryo. The work appears on the cover of Science.
News Release   06-052    11/09/2006   Lawton
Moon's Escaping Gasses Expose Fresh Surface
A fresh look at Apollo-era images combined with recent spectral data leads researchers to re-examine conventional wisdom about the Earth’s moon. Several lines of evidence suggest that the moon may have seen eruptions of interior gasses as recently as 1 million years ago, rather than 3 billion years ago – the date that had been most widely accepted.
News Release   06-051    11/08/2006   Downs
Brown Issues Report to National Commission for Long-Term Care
Brown University’s Vincent Mor and Edward Alan Miller have issued a report for the National Commission for Quality Long-Term Care outlining six key areas of concern as “the long-term care system in the United States is threatening to collapse under the massive weight of the aging Baby Boom generation.” The commission, co-chaired by former Sen. Bob Kerry and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, was established in 2004 to evaluate the country’s quality of long-term care and to make recommendations about national efforts for sustainable improvement.
News Release   06-049    11/06/2006   Baum
Pamuk, Rushdie, Featured at International Writers Project Festival
The International Writers Project at Brown University presents Strange Times, My Dear: A Freedom-to-Write Literary Festival, from Tuesday, Nov. 14, through Friday, Nov. 17, 2006. This series of readings and discussions, focused on freedom of expression, will feature internationally acclaimed authors, including Salman Rushdie, Iranian novelists Shahrnush Parsipur and Shahryar Mandanipour, and Orhan Pamuk, winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in literature. The festival is free and open to the public, but tickets are required for certain events.
News Release   06-050    11/01/2006   Baum
Brown to Host Community Forum on Slavery and Justice Report
Exactly two weeks after the University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice released its report, Brown University will host a forum for the campus community and general public. The first forum will be held Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2006, from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   06-044    10/30/2006   Baum
Brown to Host Historic Conference on Archaeology of Jerusalem
Brown University will host an historic conference titled “The Jerusalem Perspective: 150 Years of Archeological Research” Nov. 12-14, 2006. Organized by Katharina Galor, the event will be the first time Israeli and Palestinian scholars have come together in an academic exchange and discussion of their archaeological research. All sessions are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-047    10/30/2006   Baum
Modeling the formation of blood clots
New computing tools have allowed Peter Richardson, professor of engineering and physiology at Brown University, to test ideas about blood flow and clotting that he first proposed more than 30 years ago. His collaboration with mathematics colleagues Igor Pivkin and George Karniadakis resulted in a model that integrates fluid dynamics with platelet biochemistry and could provide new insights into the treatment and prevention of strokes and heart attacks.
News Release   06-048    10/30/2006   Downs
Global Security Matrix Launched as Tool to Assess Threats
Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies launched the Global Security Matrix, a web-based analytical and educational tool that visually represents threats to security. The Matrix maps security threats and vulnerabilities around the world and includes interactive features. The Global Security Matrix can be accessed at http://www.globalsecuritymatrix.org.
News Release   06-046    10/26/2006   Lynch
When is a supersolid not quite so super?
Brown University physicist Humphrey Maris and colleagues Satoshi Sasaki and Sebastien Balibar of the l’Ecole Normale Supérieure have narrowed the field of possible explanations for the weird behavior of supersolid helium. Their simple but extremely revealing experiment suggests that movement along grain boundaries is a more plausible explanation than Bose-Einstein condensates.
News Release   06-034    10/24/2006   Downs
Brown Agrees to Purchase Seven Buildings in Jewelry District
Brown University signed an agreement yesterday to purchase seven buildings and other properties in Providence’s Jewelry District. The purchase, one of the largest in University history, is a step forward in the University’s efforts to plan for strategic growth beyond College Hill.
News Release   06-043    10/24/2006   Baum
Racial Disparities Universal in Medicare Health Plans, Study Finds
Blacks do not achieve the same health outcomes as whites in managed care plans under Medicare, the nation’s largest health insurance program, according to a study conducted by Brown Medical School and Harvard Medical School researchers. Published in JAMA, the analysis surprisingly shows that significant racial disparities persist within Medicare plans – even high-performing ones – based on outcomes related to control of diabetes, cholesterol and blood pressure.
News Release   06-039    10/24/2006   Lawton
Cicilline Leads Harrop by Wide Margin in Providence Mayor's Race
A citywide survey of 403 Providence residents conducted Oct. 14-17, 2006, finds Providence Mayor David Cicilline leading Republican challenger Daniel Harrop by 66 to 13 percent. Sixty-two percent of respondents think Cicilline is doing a good job and 64 percent feel the city is headed in the right direction.
News Release   06-040    10/23/2006   Nickel
Amy Cutler Exhibition at the David Winton Bell Gallery
The David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University will present the first traveling museum exhibition of artist Amy Cutler’s work from Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006 through Friday, Dec. 22, 2006. Cutler’s highly detailed paintings have drawn associations with fables and fairy tales, dreams and surrealism, and folk art. An opening reception and gallery talk are planned. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   06-042    10/23/2006   Baum
Researchers Find "ZIP Code" Spurs Cargo Transport in Neurons
Getting molecular cargo from the cell body to the synapse of nerve cells is crucial for learning and memory, even for survival of the cell itself. New research conducted at Brown University and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., shows that a single peptide can load and direct this biological material. This peptide “ZIP Code” comes from amyloid precursor protein, the principal player in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.
News Release   06-041    10/23/2006   Lawton
Brown Releases Report of the Committee on Slavery and Justice
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons has released the report of the University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice. The report, commissioned by Simmons in 2003, outlines the University’s historical relationship to slavery and the transatlantic slave trade and makes recommendations about the ways that the University might fully and accurately acknowledge that past and move forward. The full report and related materials are available on the University’s Web site at www.brown.edu/slaveryjustice.
News Release   06-037    10/18/2006   de Ramel
Brown Students Excavate Site Around First Baptist Church
Providence’s First Baptist Church is the oldest Baptist church in America – but how was the area and its grounds used before The Meeting House was built in 1775? A group of Brown University students enrolled in Anthropology 160 is investigating that question while learning archaeological techniques, as they excavate the property surrounding this historical site.
News Release   06-036    10/11/2006   Baum
Sen. Barack Obama to Deliver Licht Lecture on Public Affairs
Barack Obama, the Democratic junior senator from Illinois, will visit Brown University on Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006, to deliver the Gov. Frank Licht Lecture. “An Evening with Barack Obama,” sponsored by the Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions, begins at 9 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, Room 101. It is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.
News Release   06-033    10/10/2006   Baum
Brown Faculty Inducted to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Geologist James W. Head III, playwright Paula Vogel, and poet Rosmarie Waldrop have been inducted as fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction of excellence in science, scholarship, business, public affairs and the arts. Head and Vogel are professors at Brown; Waldrop is a visiting scholar.
News Release   06-031    10/07/2006   Baum
"Lines of Sight" Installation to Debut at New Life Sciences Building
Artist Diane Samuels’ two-story multilayered glass installation, Lines of Sight, adorns the elevated glass pedestrian bridge connecting sections of the new Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences. It is the first work commissioned under Brown University’s Percent-for-Art program, which designates a percentage of construction budgets for public art displays. An opening reception is planned for Oct. 5, 2006.
News Release   06-029    09/27/2006   Baum
Environmental Artist to Install Sapling Sculpture on Front Campus
“Whimsical,” “fanciful,” and “hobbit-like” have been used to describe world-renowned artist Patrick Dougherty’s installation work. Commissioned by the Public Art Committee at Brown University, Dougherty will spend three weeks on campus in October creating an organic structure on the Front Campus, fashioned from locally harvested saplings. Volunteers are invited to participate.
News Release   06-028    09/26/2006   Baum
Brown University to Dedicate Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences
MIT President Susan Hockfield will deliver the keynote address as Brown University dedicates the new Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences. Events begin at 9 a.m., Friday, Oct. 6, 2006, with the formal dedication ceremony beginning at 5:30 p.m.Brown University to Dedicate Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences
News Release   06-027    09/25/2006   Lawton
Survey: Chafee and Whitehouse in Dead Heat; Carcieri Leads Fogarty
A statewide survey of 578 likely Rhode Island voters conducted Sept. 16-18, 2006, shows Sen. Lincoln Chafee and Sheldon Whitehouse in a dead heat in the U.S. Senate race and Gov. Donald Carcieri leading Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty in the gubernatorial race. The survey also finds a majority of voters opposed to amending the state constitution to build a gambling casino in West Warwick.
News Release   06-026    09/19/2006   Nickel
Paramecia Adapt Their Swimming to Changing Gravitational Force
Using a high-powered electromagnet, Brown University physicists Karine Guevorkian and James Valles have created a topsy-turvy world for the single-celled paramecium. They have managed to increase, eliminate and even reverse the effects of gravity on the tiny protozoan, changing its swimming behavior and indirectly measuring its swimming force.
News Release   06-024    09/18/2006   Downs
Oldest Writing in the New World Discovered in Veracruz, Mexico
A stone block discovered in the Olmec heartland of Veracruz, Mexico, contains the oldest writing in the New World, says an international team of archaeologists, including Stephen D. Houston of Brown University. The team determined that the block dates to the early first millennium B.C.E. – at least 400 years earlier than scholars previously thought writing existed in the Western hemisphere. The findings are published in Science.
News Release   06-021    09/14/2006   Baum
Brown Receives $26.5-Million Gift for University Scholarships
The Frederic N. Schwartz Trust has given $26.5 million to Brown University on behalf of the late Eleanor H. Schwartz, a member of the Pembroke College Class of 1929, and the late Frederic N. Schwartz. The gift will endow University scholarships for women.
News Release   06-023    09/14/2006   Baum
Brown Engineers Build a Better Battery -- With Plastic
It’s thin, light, flexible – and plastic. Brown University engineers Hyun-Kon Song and Tayhas Palmore have created a prototype polymer-based battery that packs more power than a standard alkaline battery and more storage capacity than a double-layered capacitor. Their work, published in Advanced Materials, will be of interest to the energy, defense and aerospace industries, which are looking at more efficient ways to deliver electricity.
News Release   06-022    09/13/2006   Lawton
Brown Team Creates Uncanny Cell Replicas for Treatment, Research
Is that Schwann cell real – or replica? A Brown University biomedical engineer had a tough time telling apart genuine cells from fakes after casting plastic reproductions of these nervous system support cells out of silicon. The rubbery replicas, described in the journal Langmuir, could be used for all sorts of cell types in laboratory research or medical treatments for repairing nerve damage.
News Release   06-020    09/12/2006   Lawton
Asteroids and Meteorites Reveal Family Resemblance
Using data collected by the Japanese space probe Hayabusa in a rendezvous with the 550-meter asteroid Itokawa, researchers have demonstrated that space weathering occurs even on small asteroids. The new data, published in Nature, confirm that the mineral composition of such asteroids is consistent with meteorites fallen on Earth.
News Release   06-019    09/07/2006   Downs
Methamphetamine Use Restricts Fetal Growth, Study Finds
Results from the first large-scale, prospective study of prenatal methamphetamine use show that newborns exposed to the drug are more than three times as likely to be born underweight. Appearing in Pediatrics, the findings mirror those from studies of prenatal cocaine use, says Barry Lester, a professor and researcher at Brown Medical School and Women & Infants Hospital.
News Release   06-015    09/05/2006   Lawton
Death of a Parasite: Stripped, Surrounded, Consumed
For the first time, a group of researchers has shown that a parasite can be eliminated through autophagy, a recycling process that normally occurs inside cells. The team, led by George Yap of Brown University, shows that the immune system destroys and disposes of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii by stripping it naked then gobbling it up.
News Release   06-014    08/28/2006   Lawton
Brown's Remote T.V. Interview Studio Is Up and Running
Broadcast media now have quick and easy access to the expertise and informed critical commentary of Brown University faculty. The University has installed a remote broadcast interview facility that can connect faculty experts quickly with broadcast reporters and anchors anywhere in the world. Brown’s Office of Media Relations operates the facility.
News Release   06-012    08/23/2006   de Ramel
Katherine Bergeron to Address Incoming Students September 5
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons will officially open the 2006-07 academic year at Opening Convocation, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2006. Dean of the College Katherine Bergeron will deliver this year’s keynote address to the 2,061 students beginning undergraduate, graduate, and medical studies at Brown. The ceremony begins at noon on The College Green.
News Release   06-013    08/22/2006   Baum
Ten Artists Present Installations at Bell Gallery and List Art Center
The David Winton Bell Gallery and Brown University’s Department of Visual Art present in TRANSIT: from OBJECT to SITE, from Saturday, Sept. 9, through Sunday, Oct. 22, 2006, at Brown University. The collaborative exhibition features a series of installations displayed throughout List Art Center, transforming the modernist architecture of Philip Johnson’s 1971 building into a lively space of diverse multimedia and site-based projects.
News Release   06-011    08/21/2006   Baum
New Treatment Model for Bipolar Disorder Shows Promise
A new model of treatment for bipolar disorder, similar to care given to diabetics and others with chronic diseases, improved patient outcomes without adding costs, according to new research funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Results appear in Psychiatric Services.
News Release   06-009    08/10/2006   Lawton
The Shape of Life: Research Sheds Light on How Cells Take Shape
Brown University physicists have identified a surprising force in pattern formation – physical force. Results of their work shed important light on how life takes shape inside cells and are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   06-008    08/03/2006   Lawton
Texas and New Jersey Are Best States for American e-Government
In their seventh annual study, researchers at Brown University’s Taubman Center for Public Policy ranked Texas and New Jersey as the two states with the best online government services. On the federal level, FirstGov.com, a Web portal, was rated best, followed by the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
News Release   06-006    08/01/2006   Goldstein
Campus Compact Students Contribute $5.6B in Community Service
Volunteer hours add up. According to an annual study by Campus Compact, students at the coalition's nearly 1,000 member schools contributed an estimated $5.6 billion worth of service to their communities. Based at Brown University, Campus Compact is a national organization dedicated to fulfilling the civic purposes of higher education.
News Release   06-005    07/24/2006   Goldstein
Controlling Movement Through Thought Alone
For the first time, a team led by Brown University researchers is publishing detailed clinical trial results that show a tiny new brain sensor allowed a quadriplegic to open a prosthetic hand, control a robotic limb and move a computer cursor – using thoughts alone. The work, featured on the cover of Nature, offers important insights into the human brain and how to tap its power to improve the lives of people with spinal cord injury and other severe motor impairments.
News Release   06-002    07/12/2006   Lawton
Brown Engineers Use DNA to Direct Nanowire Assembly and Growth
A small but growing number of engineers are using nature’s engineer – DNA – to create nanomaterials that can be used in everything from medical devices to computer circuits. A team from Brown University and Boston College is the first to use DNA to direct construction and growth of complex nanowires. Their work appears in Nanotechnology.
News Release   06-003    07/10/2006   Lawton
Problem: Implant Infection. Solution: Nanotech Surfaces
For the first time, engineers have created surfaces for orthopaedic implants that reduce the presence of bacteria. The research, led by Brown University engineer Thomas Webster, may lead to a new class of artificial joints. That is a big market: More than 750,000 Americans undergo knee, hip or shoulder replacement surgery each year.
News Release   06-001    07/06/2006   Lawton
How Cooperation Can Evolve in a Cheater's World
Whether you’re a free-loading virus or a meat-stealing monkey, selfishness pays. So how could cooperators survive in a cheater’s world? Thomas Flatt, a postdoctoral research associate at Brown, was part of a group that created a theoretical model that neatly solves this dilemma, which has stumped evolutionary biologists and social scientists for decades. The trick: Keep the altruists in small groups, away from the swindling horde, where they multiply and migrate.
News Release   05-145    06/29/2006   Lawton
Chafee, Whitehouse in Dead Heat; Whitehouse Leads Laffey for Senate
A statewide survey of 719 Rhode Island voters conducted June 24-26, 2006, shows Sen. Lincoln Chafee in a virtual tie with Democratic challenger Sheldon Whitehouse. Whitehouse would have a strong lead if Steve Laffey were the Republican candidate. The survey also finds Gov. Don Carcieri with a 5-percentage point lead over Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty and finds voters opposed to amending the state constitution to build a gambling casino in West Warwick.
News Release   05-143    06/27/2006   Nickel
Brown, Oak Ridge Team Up for Materials Science Research
Brown University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have established a formal affiliation to support research and teaching with an emphasis in materials science, an area of strength at both institutions.
News Release   05-144    06/27/2006   Lawton
Katherine Bergeron Named Dean of the College at Brown University
Katherine Bergeron, professor and chair of the Department of Music at Brown University, has been named dean of the College. Bergeron succeeds Paul Armstrong, who has served since October 2000.
News Release   05-141    06/12/2006   Goldstein
Corporation of Brown University Elects Five Trustees
The Corporation of Brown University elected five trustees at its regular spring meeting Friday, May 26, 2006. They will be formally engaged at the next Corporation meeting in October 2006.
News Release   05-139    06/05/2006   Goldstein
Science Team Determines Composition of Asteroid Itokawa
For the first time, a group of scientists have an intimate look at a small asteroid, this one dubbed Itokawa. Using data from the Japanese space probe Hayabusa, the team has determined the mineral makeup and surface characteristics of Itokawa and published their findings in Science. Itokawa and other asteroids contain materials relatively unchanged since the birth of the solar system, offering clues to how the system has evolved over time.
News Release   05-138    06/01/2006   Lawton
Brown to Commemorate 225th Anniversary of the March to Yorktown
This summer marks the 225th anniversary of the march to Yorktown, Va., where French and American forces won a decisive victory over British troops, thus bringing an end to the major battles of the American Revolutionary War. The Brown University campus, which was an encampment site for French soldiers in June 1781, will commemorate the anniversary on Saturday, June 17, 2006, with a symposium organized by the John Carter Brown Library and a procession from The College Green to the Rhode Island State House.
News Release   05-137    05/30/2006   Goldstein
Advisory: Brown to confer 2,245 degrees at 238th Commencement
Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will preside at the University’s 238th Commencement exercises Sunday, May 28, 2006, during which 2,245 degrees will be conferred.
News Release   05-133    05/27/2006   de Ramel
Algae's Protein "Tails" Create Motion -- and Aid Munching
Flagella, the wee whips that set some microorganisms in motion, also help colonies of green algae take in additional nutrients. This finding, made by a team of scientists from University of Arizona and Brown University, may help explain how some organisms make the evolutionary leap to multicellularity.
News Release   05-134    05/26/2006   Lawton
Brown and Affiliated Hospitals Name Zink Emergency Medicine Chief
Brian J. Zink, M.D., is chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Brown Medical School and emergency medicine physician-in-chief at Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital.
News Release   05-135    05/26/2006   Lawton
Pomp and Thermodynamics: Brown Graduates First Teacher-Engineer
The Brown University Class of 2006 will include its first teacher-engineer, who graduates this month with a bachelor’s degree in engineering – and a certificate to teach physics in grades seven to 12. This one-of-a-kind teacher preparation program aims to train students to teach physics in an engaging, hands-on style. The program will also address a national shortage of physics teachers.
News Release   05-132    05/23/2006   Lawton
Juliet V. Garcia Will Deliver Baccalaureate Address on May 27, 2006
University of Texas–Brownsville President Juliet V. García will deliver the baccalaureate address to Brown University’s graduating seniors on Saturday, May 27, 2006, at 3 p.m. in the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   05-130    05/22/2006   de Ramel
Paul Volcker To Deliver Ogden Lecture: "Is the U.N. Up to Its Job?"
Economist and former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, will deliver a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. ’60 Memorial Lecture on International Relations on Saturday, May 27, 2006, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. His address titled “Is the U.N. Up to Its Job?” is part of the annual Commencement Forums, offered during Brown University’s Commencement Weekend. The public is welcome.
News Release   05-131    05/22/2006   Goldstein
Annual Commencement Forum Will Honor Sen. Claiborne Pell
Brown University has established an annual Commencement Forum to honor Sen. Claiborne Pell’s 36 years of distinguished service to the United States Senate. The inaugural Pell Forum, on Saturday, May 27, 2006, will be a panel discussion covering areas of particular interest to the Senator during his political career – higher education, the arts, and foreign relations.
News Release   05-129    05/17/2006   Goldstein
Bell Gallery Displays Retrospective of Friedrich St.Florian's Career
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a retrospective of Friedrich St.Florian’s work, opening Friday, May 26, and running through Sunday, July 2, 2006. The exhibition honors the architect at the time of his retirement from teaching and on the occasion of being awarded an honorary degree during Brown University’s 238th Commencement.
News Release   05-128    05/12/2006   Goldstein
Greta Pemberton and Ari Savitzky To Deliver Senior Orations
Greta Pemberton of Silver Spring, Md., and Ari Savitzky of Providence, R.I., will deliver senior orations to their classmates on Sunday, May 28, 2006, at 12:50 p.m. on The College Green. Pemberton’s address is titled “Consider Play,” and Savitzky’s is titled “Save the Oration (for Tomorrow).”
News Release   05-127    05/09/2006   de Ramel
Clyde L. Briant Appointed Vice President for Research
Clyde L. Briant, dean of engineering and the Otis E. Randall University Professor at Brown, has been appointed vice president for research, effective July 1, 2006. Briant succeeds Andries van Dam, the inaugural vice president.
News Release   05-126    05/08/2006   de Ramel
"Believing Africa" Is Haffenreffer Museum's Second On-Campus Exhibition
Brown University’s Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology will open its second on-campus exhibition, Believing Africa, on Saturday, May 27, 2006, in its satellite gallery at Manning Hall. The exhibition, focusing on the diversity of African spiritual beliefs, was co-curated by Brown graduate and undergraduate students.
News Release   05-117    05/03/2006   Goldstein
Brown University and RISD Honor Colleagues in Awards Ceremony
Members of the Brown and RISD communities recognized faculty and student colleagues for their outstanding commitments to teaching and mentoring at Awards Ceremony 2006.
News Release   05-124    05/03/2006   Goldstein
Fussy Babies and Postpartum Depression Linked, Study Finds
Researchers from Brown Medical School and the Rhode Island Department of Health have found a strong association between mothers with symptoms of postpartum depression and those with colicky infants. The study, the first to show such a link using population-based data, will be presented May 2 at the Pediatric Academic Societies’ 2006 Annual Meeting.
News Release   05-114    05/02/2006   Lawton
Successful Treatment of Alcoholism Found in The Doctor's Office
Attention from doctors, nurses and other health professionals, combined with either the drug naltrexone or specialized counseling, is the most effective way to treat alcohol dependence, according to results of the largest clinical trial ever conducted on drug and therapy interventions for alcoholism. Researchers at Brown Medical School ran the largest clinical site for the trial at Roger Williams Medical Center. Results appear in JAMA.
News Release   05-115    05/02/2006   Lawton
Faculty To Present Highest Honor to Sen. Claiborne Pell
During Brown University Commencement ceremonies on Sunday, May 28, 2006, former U.S. Sen. Claiborne Pell, Rhode Island’s longest serving senator, will be presented with the University faculty’s highest honor, the Susan Colver Rosenberger Medal.
News Release   05-121    05/02/2006   Goldstein
Provost Robert Zimmer To Speak at Graduate School Convocation
Outgoing Provost Robert J. Zimmer will deliver an address at Brown University’s Graduate School Commencement on Sunday, May 29, 2006, on Lincoln Field. Shankar K. Prasad, a doctoral candidate in political science, will present the student address, titled “A Diverse Community of One: Lessons Learned and Experiences Shared.”
News Release   05-122    05/02/2006   Goldstein
Social Pioneer Geoffrey Canada To Address Medical School Graduates
Geoffrey Canada, acclaimed advocate for inner-city children, will address the 32nd Brown Medical School graduating class Sunday, May 28, 2006, in the First Unitarian Church. Colin Harrington, M.D., a clinical associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior, will deliver the faculty address, and Daniel Vázquez, a candidate for the M.D. degree, will deliver the student address. Dean of Medicine and Biological Sciences Eli Y. Adashi, M.D., will preside.
News Release   05-123    05/02/2006   Lawton
Brown University will confer eight honorary degrees on May 28
Brown University will confer eight honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Sunday, May 28, upon children’s advocate Geoffrey Canada; Juliet V. García, president of the University of Texas at Brownsville; business executive Martin J. Granoff; mental health advocate Kay Redfield Jamison; Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, finance minister of Nigeria; Rhode Island architect Friedrich St. Florian; HIV specialist Suniti Solomon; and economist Paul A. Volcker.
News Release   05-116    05/02/2006   Sweeney
Hurricane Katrina Reshaped Political Map of New Orleans, Report Says
As the Big Easy heads into a mayoral runoff this month between incumbent Ray Nagin and Louisiana Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landreiu, the city may elect a white mayor for the first time in nearly 30 years. A report released by Brown University sociologist John Logan says Hurricane Katrina has reshaped the political map of New Orleans. He found the voice of black neighborhoods has been diminished – a result, he says, that should have been foreseen.
News Release   05-118    05/01/2006   Goldstein
Brown University to Hold 238th Commencement on Sunday, May 28
Chief Marshal L. Roger Hale will lead more than 6,000 people down College Hill on Sunday, May 28, 2006, in one of the nation’s largest and most colorful academic pageants. The procession and academic exercises will cap a three-day Commencement/Reunion Weekend on the Brown campus. Brown University’s 238th Commencement will follow a new plan, for the first time in the history of the University. Due in part to the large size of the Class of 2006, graduates will assemble in front of the First Baptist Church in America, rather than inside.
News Release   05-119    05/01/2006   de Ramel
Women's Sports Pioneers to Attend Inaugural Colloquium at Brown
Well-known sports figures Julie Foudy, Mary Carillo and Donna de Varona will take part in Brown University’s inaugural Sports in Society Colloquium, “Changing the Landscape of Women’s Athletics,” on Friday, May 5, 2006. The night before the Colloquium, there will be special screening of Dare to Dream: The Story of the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team. Both events are open to the public.
News Release   05-120    05/01/2006   Goldstein
Two Brown Faculty, One Visiting Scholar Elected Fellows of AAAS
Geologist James W. Head III, playwright Paula Vogel, and poet Rosmarie Waldrop have been elected fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction of excellence in science, scholarship, business, public affairs and the arts. Head and Vogel are professors at Brown; Rosmarie Waldrop is a visiting scholar.
News Release   05-113    04/25/2006   de Ramel
Legacy of Lead Poisoning Detailed at Annual Barnes Lecture
Herbert Needleman, M.D., one of the foremost experts on childhood lead poisoning, will deliver the Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes Jr. Lecture in Public Health on Wednesday, April 26, 2006. The free lecture begins at 4 p.m. in Andrews Hall and is open to the public.
News Release   05-110    04/21/2006   Lawton
"Dead Zone" Summer Killed Billions of Ocean State Mussels
A “dead zone” that formed in 2001 in Narragansett Bay left a lethal legacy, Brown University research shows. In a study of nine mussel reefs, published in Ecology, researchers report that oxygen-depleted water killed one reef and nearly wiped out the rest. A year later, only one of the nine reefs was recovering. The result was a sharp reduction in the reefs’ ability to filter phytoplankton, a process that helps control “dead zone” formation.
News Release   05-108    04/11/2006   Lawton
60 Minutes Correspondent Ed Bradley to Receive Welles Hangen Award
60 Minutes and CBS News Correspondent Ed Bradley will be presented with Brown University’s Welles Hangen Award for Superior Achievement in Journalism on Friday, April 21, 2006, at 4 p.m. in Sayles Hall. The award honors the memory of Welles Hangen ’49, a foreign correspondent and broadcast journalist, killed in 1970 while covering the war in Vietnam. Note: Because of schedule conficts, the award ceremony has been postponed to the fall semester. See update: 05-107p.
News Release   05-107    04/10/2006   Goldstein
Brown University Geologists Create 5-Million-Year Climate Record
Brown University geologists have created the longest continuous record of ocean surface temperatures, dating back 5 million years. The record shows slow, steady cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific, a finding that challenges the notion that the Ice Ages alone sparked a global cooling trend. Results are published in Science.
News Release   05-106    04/06/2006   Lawton
Children's Defense Fund Founder Marian Wright Edelman to Speak
Award-winning author and children’s advocate Marian Wright Edelman will address the Brown community in the sixth annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 11, 2006. Her speech, “Stand Up for Children Now, ” will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The event is free and open to the public.
News Release   05-105    04/03/2006   Goldstein
Friction-Reduction Recipe: Add Two Atoms and Lots of Heat
Get molecules moving, atom bumping against atom, and friction is bound to follow. Or does it? Surprising Brown University and University of Southern California research shows that under certain conditions in liquids, molecular motion destroys – rather than creates – friction. The work, published in Science, may rewrite the rulebook for chemical reactions.
News Release   05-101    03/30/2006   Lawton
Bell Gallery Presents "7 Documentarians" Photography Exhibition
Images by seven American photographers will be shown in the Bell Gallery’s latest exhibition, 7 Documentarians, from April 12 through May 10, 2006. The exhibition takes visitors through a history of 20th-century documentary photography, with subjects ranging from the Depression-era rural south to New York City street life to baseball stadiums of the 1980s.
News Release   05-103    03/29/2006   Goldstein
Brown University To Host 2006 Ivy Film Festival April 5-9
Student filmmakers and film industry professionals will come together for the 2006 Ivy Film Festival at Brown University April 5-9, 2006. The festival will showcase 36 student films and include advance screenings of eight feature films. Michael Showalter, a 1992 Brown graduate, writer and director of The Baxter, will give the keynote address on Friday, April 7. All events are open to the public.
News Release   05-104    03/29/2006   Goldstein
Two Brown Students Named 2006 Truman Scholars
The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation is honoring Te-Ping Chen and Geoffrey Gusoff, both of the Class of 2007, for their exceptional leadership skills, demonstrated academic excellence, and commitment to public service. The Truman Scholarships enable college students to attend graduate school in preparation for careers in government or public service.
News Release   05-102    03/28/2006   Goldstein
Teens and Sleep Poll a Wake-Up Call, Pediatric Sleep Experts Say
New poll data from the National Sleep Foundation shows that only one in five teen-agers gets a full night’s sleep, negatively affecting school performance, driving and mood. Researchers at Brown Medical School and affiliates Bradley Hospital and Hasbro Children’s Hospital are national experts in pediatric sleep and call the results a “wake-up call” for parents.
News Release   05-100    03/28/2006   Lawton
Two Brown Undergraduates Awarded Goldwater Scholarships
Two Brown University juniors, Kartik Pattabiraman and Brenda Rubenstein, have been selected as Barry M. Goldwater Scholars for the 2006-2007 academic year. The scholarship program is designed to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.
News Release   05-098    03/21/2006   Goldstein
Brown, Microsoft To Announce Pen-Based Computing Alliance
Brown University and Microsoft Research will hold a joint press conference at 1 p.m. Monday, March 20, 2006, at the Watson Center for Information Technology to announce the first academic research program in the nation dedicated to pen-centric computing innovation.
News Release   05-095a    03/16/2006   Lawton
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton To Deliver Inaugural Lecture
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton will visit Brown University to deliver the inaugural lecture of the Doherty-Granoff Forum on Women Leaders on Saturday, April 8, 2006. Her address begins at 7:45 p.m. in Meehan Auditorium. Tickets will be available to holders of active Brown IDs beginning Friday, March 17. The Office of Media Relations will issue press credentials for reporters covering the event.
News Release   05-094    03/15/2006   Goldstein
David Winton Bell Gallery to Host 26th Annual Student Exhibition
This year’s best student artwork will be shown in the 26th annual Student Exhibition at the David Winton Bell Gallery from Saturday, March 18, through Sunday, April 2, 2006. An opening reception for the artists will be held Saturday, March 18, from 7 to 9 p.m. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   05-092    03/10/2006   Goldstein
Federal Science Chief to Speak on Basic Research Funding
Raymond L. Orbach, director of the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy, will visit Brown University on Friday, March 10, 2006, to see science demonstrations and discuss federal funding for basic research. Gov. Donald L. Carcieri will accompany Orbach during his visit.
News Release   05-090    03/09/2006   Lawton
Provost Robert J. Zimmer To Become University of Chicago President
The Board of Trustees of the University of Chicago has received a recommendation from its Presidential Search Committee that Robert J. Zimmer, currently provost of Brown University, be elected the University of Chicago’s next president. Chicago’s Board will act on the recommendation at a special meeting Friday, March 10, 2006. President Simmons’ message to Brown’s faculty, staff and students, sent Thursday morning, March 9, follows here.
News Release   05-091    03/09/2006   Nickel
Brown Hosts Conference on Closing School Readiness Gaps
Early childhood leaders will meet at Brown University on March 8 to discuss how to best prepare minority children for success at school. The conference, co-sponsored by Brown’s Center for Human Development and Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, will feature remarks by Columbia University professor Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Providence Schools Superintendent Donnie Evans.
News Release   05-088    03/02/2006   Lawton
New Class of Compounds Promise Better Drugs, Clean Energy
Brown University chemists have created a new class of compounds that promise to produce prescription drugs more cheaply as well as to provide models for hydrogen storage – a key feature for clean energy production and use. The work has landed in top journals, including a cover of Chemical Communications this month, and has prompted two patent filings.
News Release   05-087    02/28/2006   Lawton
Corporation Approves 8.2% FY07 Budget Increase, Sets Tuition and Fees
The Corporation of Brown University has approved a fiscal year 2007 consolidated budget of $664.1 million, an 8.2-percent increase over FY06. Total undergraduate fees will rise 4.7 percent to $43,754, including a 5-percent rise in tuition to $33,888.
News Release   05-083    02/25/2006   Nickel
Brown Votes to Divest from Sudan in Response to Genocide
Brown University's governing board voted to divest the University from companies supporting and facilitating the Sudanese government in its continuing sponsorship of genocidal actions and human rights violations in Darfur.
News Release   05-084    02/25/2006   Goldstein
One Nation Indivisible? Experts to Discuss Persistence of Class in America
Some of the nation’s leading voices on class issues in America will gather at Brown University on March 6 and 7, 2006, for the 26th annual Providence Journal/Brown University Public Affairs Conference, titled “One Nation Indivisible? The Persistence of Class in American Culture.” Author and The New York Times columnist David Brooks will deliver the keynote address, the Michael P. Metcalf–Howard R. Swearer Memorial Lecture. All events are free and open to the public.
News Release   05-082    02/21/2006   Goldstein
Brown Community Invited to Planning Meeting
Brown University will present a review of its Institutional Master Plan, including the University’s role in the Thayer Street Improvement District, to all members of the Brown Community on Wednesday, March 1, 2006. The meeting will be held at Brown Hillel, the Glenn and Darcy Weiner Hillel Center for Jewish Life, from 5 to 7 p.m.
News Release   05-081    02/21/2006   deRamel
Progeria Progress: Studies Show How Mutant Protein Hurts Hearts
Two new research studies on progeria, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, detail the damage a mutant protein does to blood vessel cells of humans and mice. The discoveries offer increased hope for a cure for progeria, a genetic condition fatal in children, but may also provide key insight into the cause of adult heart disease.
News Release   05-079    02/16/2006   Lawton
Sen. Reed To Give Ogden Lecture: President Bush and The Long War
U.S. Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) will visit Brown University to deliver a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lecture on International Affairs on Friday, March 3, 2006. His address, “President Bush and the Long War: Are Slogans Enough?” begins at 6 p.m. in the List Arts Center, 64 College St. It is free and open to the public. Reed will be available for press interviews.
News Release   05-076    02/15/2006   Goldstein
A Surprising Pair of Proteins Help Make Healthy Eggs
Biologists at Brown University and the University of California–Berkeley have discovered that two proteins team up to turn on an assortment of ovarian genes critical to the production of healthy eggs. This finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sheds important light on the biochemical processes underpinning fertility.
News Release   05-075    02/15/2006   Lawton
A Fresh Spin in Quantum Physics: The 'Spin Triple' Supercurrent
For the first time, scientists have created a “spin triplet” supercurrent through a ferromagnet over a long distance. Achieved with a magnet developed at Brown University and the University of Alabama, the feat upends long-standing theories of quantum physics – and may be a boon to the budding field of “spintronics,” where the spin of electrons, along with their charge, is harnessed to power computer chips and circuits. Results are published in Nature.
News Release   05-078    02/15/2006   Lawton
Survey: Chafee Narrowly Leads Opponents; Brown Leads Whitehouse
A statewide survey of 785 Rhode Island voters, conducted Feb. 4-6, 2006, finds Sen. Lincoln Chafee in a close race with his likely Democratic challengers and Gov. Donald Carcieri with an 11-point lead over Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty. A majority of Rhode Island voters say they are unprepared for a major hurricane. Questions and Answers are included.
News Release   05-073    02/08/2006   Nickel
Aging Cells, Aging Body: Fresh Evidence for a Connection
When cells age and stop dividing, how much do they contribute to whole-body aging? Brown University research strengthens the case for a strong connection by providing evidence that non-dividing or “replicatively senescent” cells can be found in large numbers in old animals. The research, led by John Sedivy, is the first to quantify the presence of these cells in any species. Results are published by Science.
News Release   05-071    02/02/2006   Lawton
Brown University Library Collections Annex To Open Officially
The Library Collections Annex at Brown University will officially open on Feb. 3, 2006, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony by President Ruth Simmons. Planning for the high-density storage facility has been in the works for more than a decade and is one outcome of Brown’s billion-dollar Plan for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   05-070    01/30/2006   Goldstein
Intercollegiate Athletics at Brown Undergoes Routine Review by NCAA
Brown University has undertaken a comprehensive study of its intercollegiate athletics program as required every 10 years by the NCAA. President Ruth J. Simmons has appointed a steering committee whose members will collect and review data, gain broad campus input, and produce a report for the NCAA. Brown received a status of certified, without conditions, after its last review in 1997.
News Release   05-069    01/27/2006   Sweeney
Brown Creates First In-Depth Demographic Analysis of Katrina's Impact
The images were accurate: The Gulf Coast’s poor, black residents were hit hardest by Hurricane Katrina, according to findings by a Brown University sociologist. Professor John Logan’s new research is the first of its kind from the disaster zone and raises provocative questions about the future population of New Orleans.
News Release   05-068    01/25/2006   Goldstein
Brown's ArtsLiteracy Project Receives White House Award
The ArtsLiteracy Project, based in the Education Department at Brown University, was nationally recognized at the White House Jan. 25, 2006. The program received the 2005 Coming Up Taller Award, which recognizes outstanding community arts and humanities programs that celebrate the creativity of America’s youth.
News Release   05-067    01/25/2006   Goldstein
HIV Prevention Hope: Yogurt Bugs That Make Antiviral Drugs
A research team lead by Bharat Ramratnam, a Brown Medical School professor, has genetically modified bacteria found in yogurt so that the bugs produce a protein proven to block HIV infection in monkeys. The results offer hope for a microbicide that can prevent the spread of HIV, which now affects about 40 million people.
News Release   05-066    01/23/2006   Lawton
Brown, R.I. Department of Health Team up for Public Health Training
From bird flu to bioterrorism, epidemiology to environmental health, Rhode Island health leaders this year can learn about topics critical to improving public health, through a new training program planned by Brown Medical School and the Rhode Island Department of Health.
News Release   05-063    01/12/2006   Lawton
Edward L. Widmer Named New Director of John Carter Brown Library
Edward L. Widmer has been appointed director and librarian of the John Carter Brown Library, marking the library’s first change in leadership in 23 years. Prior to this, Widmer served as inaugural director of the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and associate professor of history at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. He will begin his new post July 1, 2006.
News Release   05-062    01/10/2006   Goldstein
Bell Gallery To Show Work of Joseph Beuys from New England Collections
Another View of Joseph Beuys: Multiples from New England Collections brings together more than 100 works by “one of the most significant figures in contemporary art” at Brown University’s David Winton Bell Gallery. The exhibition, coinciding with the 20th anniversary of the German artist’s death, runs Saturday, Jan. 28, through March 8, 2005. An opening reception will be held Friday, Jan. 27.
News Release   05-058    01/06/2006   Goldstein
Not So Different After All: Mysterious Eye Cells Adapt To Light
Unlike their cousins, rods and cones, newly discovered retinal cells don’t aid sight in a traditional sense. Instead, they constrict the eye’s pupil and set the body’s circadian clock. But new research from Brown University – where the photoreceptors were discovered by David Berson and colleagues – shows that these cells are sensitive to lighting conditions in a manner similar to rods and cones. Results appear in Neuron.
News Release   05-059    01/04/2006   Lawton
$1.1M of Sidney Frank Gift Will Fund 'Recovery Semester' Scholarships
With the endorsement of philanthropist Sidney E. Frank, Brown University will use $1.1 million of Frank’s $5-million hurricane relief gift to establish “recovery semester” scholarships next semester at Dillard University and Xavier University of Louisiana, both in New Orleans, and Tougaloo College in Jackson, Miss. The scholarships will help students resume or continue their studies and will help provide the schools with sufficient numbers of students to begin the return to normal operations.
News Release   05-056    12/21/2005   Nickel
Brown Sends Avian Flu Advisory as Holiday Travel Season Begins
As students, faculty and staff prepare for holiday travel, senior administrators at Brown University sent an e-mail advisory to the campus community, offering health information and providing a list of information resources about avian flu. The text of that message follows here.
News Release   05-057    12/21/2005   Nickel
Surprising Killer of Southeastern Salt Marshes: Common Sea Snails
From South Carolina to Texas, salt marshes have experienced a massive die-off in recent years, threatening fisheries and leaving coastal areas vulnerable to flooding. The culprit, ecologists have long thought, is degraded soil. But new research, published in Science, points to the periwinkle – cordgrass consuming sea snails – as a major contributor to salt marsh loss.
News Release   05-054    12/15/2005   Lawton
What Can Change In The Brain? Electrical Synapses, Research Shows
Plasticity – the brain’s ability to change based on experience and its own activity – is a key to critical functions such as making memories. Brown University scientists are the first to show that neural activity causes long-lasting changes in electrical synapses in the brains of mammals. Results are published in Science.
News Release   05-055    12/15/2005   Lawton
Study Evaluates Criminal Justice Handling of R.I. Statutory Rape Cases
A study of all statutory rape cases brought before Rhode Island Superior Court from 1985 through 2002 finds evidence of significant leniency. The study, conducted at Brown’s Taubman Center for Public Policy by Ross Cheit, Laura Braslow and Veena Srinivasa, makes recommendations to improve the performance of the criminal justice system in cases of statutory rape.
News Release   05-053    12/08/2005   Nickel
Katrina: From Disaster to Renewal
Brown University will host a colloquium, “Katrina: From Disaster to Renewal,” on Saturday, Dec. 3, 2005, from 12:30 p.m. – 6 p.m. in Sayles Hall. The event is free and open to the public, featuring a conversation with Brown President Ruth J. Simmons and Marvalene Hughes, president of Dillard University; a reading by Brenda Osbey, poet laureate of Louisiana; and panel discussions from Rhode Islanders who were among the first to respond to the catastrophe on the Gulf Coast.
News Release   05-051    11/30/2005   DeRamel
Brown Community Invited to Review of Institutional Master Plan
Brown will present a review of its Institutional Master Plan, including parking and traffic concerns, to all members of the Brown community, Tuesday December 13, 2005, in the Vartan Gregorian Lounge, from 5 to 7 p.m.
News Release   05-052    11/30/2005   Montgomery
The Impossible Is Possible: Laser Light from Silicon
Silicon has made its way into everything from computers to cameras. But a silicon laser? Physically impossible – until now. A Brown University research team led by Jimmy Xu has engineered the first directly pumped silicon laser by changing the structure of the silicon crystal through a novel nanoscale technique. Results appear in an advanced online publication of Nature Materials.
News Release   05-049    11/21/2005   Lawton
Less Sleep, More Struggles for Elementary and Middle School Students
Elementary and middle school students have more learning and attention problems when they sleep eight hours or less at night, according to Brown Medical School and Bradley Hospital researchers. Their study – the first to ask teachers to report on sleep restriction effects – points up the importance of sleep when assessing the causes of, and treatments for, learning difficulties in children. Study results appear in the December issue of the journal SLEEP.
News Release   05-046    11/10/2005   Lawton
NSF Grant Supports Materials Research Science and Engineering Center
The National Science Foundation has awarded Brown University $9.4 million to continue the work of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, a project aimed at creating new or more reliable materials for industries such electronics and aerospace. The center also provides materials science education and training to public school students and teachers as well as undergraduates.
News Release   05-044    11/10/2005   Lawton
Brown University Scientists Testing Toxicity of Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials can be found in everything from cosmetics to concrete to car bumpers. But are these atomic-scale tubes, fibers, spheres, crystals and films safe? A multidisciplinary team of scientists at Brown University is testing nanomaterial toxicity with funding from the National Science Foundation.
News Release   05-045    11/10/2005   Lawton
Bell to Show "Labyrinths" of Mancuska, McGill, Shotz through Dec. 22
Labyrinths, a group exhibition that explores the search for direction, for self, for discovery and for meaning, features work of Jan Mancuska, Domenic McGill, and Alyson Shotz. The exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 12, 2005, and runs through Dec. 22. The exhibit and an opening reception (5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11,) are open to the public without charge.
News Release   05-038    11/07/2005   Nickel
NIH Grants $11 Million to Brown University for Cancer Research
The National Institutes of Health has awarded Brown University a five-year, $11-million Center of Biomedical Research Excellence grant. The funding will allow researchers to explore how healthy cells become cancerous – knowledge critical to finding cures for the second leading cause of death in the United States.
News Release   05-033    10/06/2005   Lawton
Committee To Begin Year with Workshop on Legacies of U.S. Slavery
Brown University’s Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice will offer a workshop and a speaker series as its on-campus program for the fall semester. The committee was charged to investigate the University’s historical relationship to slavery and the slave trade and to organize public events about the historical, legal, political, and moral questions that this history raises. The committee is due to issue its report at the end of the year.
News Release   05-032    09/27/2005   Nickel
Brown Licenses Internet ID Verification Technology to Startup Firm
Brown University has licensed a portfolio of Internet security technology to a group of entrepreneurs that has established IAM Technology Inc. The technology, developed by Brown Computer Science Professor Roberto Tamassia and associates, provides a rapid way to validate identity on Internet domains. Brown will retain an equity stake in IAM Technology.
News Release   05-031    09/20/2005   Nickel
Nozaki Named Associate Dean of the College, Director of Swearer Center
Roger Nozaki, executive director of the General Electric Foundation, has been named an associate dean of the College and director of the Howard R. Swearer Center for Public Service at Brown University. Nozaki, who earned a Master of Arts in Teaching at Brown in 1989, will begin his duties Nov. 1, 2005.
News Release   05-030    09/19/2005   Sweeney
Breast Cancer Screening Trial Shows Digital Mammogram Benefits
Results of one of the largest breast cancer screening trials show that digital mammography detects significantly more cancers than film mammography in younger women and in women with dense breasts. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) conducted the trial in conjunction with the Center for Statistical Sciences at Brown Medical School. The New England Journal of Medicine reports the results.
News Release   05-029    09/16/2005   Lawton
Indian Foreign Minister Will Present Major Public Address Sept. 23
K. Natwar Singh, India’s minister of external affairs, will deliver “The Argument for India,” his only major public address while in the United States, at Brown University on Friday, Sept. 23, at 2:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall, located on The College Green. The lecture is open to the public without charge. [News Release   05-027    09/15/2005   Sweeney
Survey: Chafee Leads Laffey, Whitehouse Leads Brown for Senate Nominations
A statewide survey of 449 Rhode Island voters conducted Sept. 10-11, 2005, finds that U.S. Sen. Lincoln Chafee leads Cranston Mayor Stephen Laffey in the campaign for the Republican senatorial nomination, while former Attorney General Sheldon Whitehouse is ahead of Secretary of State Matt Brown for the Democratic nomination. Only 25 percent of R.I. voters believe President Bush is doing an excellent or good job.
News Release   05-026    09/13/2005   Nickel
MELT Data Sheds New and Surprising Light on Birth of Oceanic Plates
In the first joint interpretation of data from the landmark MELT study, a team of scientists including Donald Forsyth of Brown University has found unexpected changes in the patterns of seismic velocity and electrical conductivity near the East Pacific Rise, changes due to dehydration and cooling. Results are published in Nature.
News Release   05-020    09/08/2005   Lawton
Brown and Cyberkinetics Sign Collaborative Research Agreement
Brown University and Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems Inc. have signed a research and licensing agreement under which eligible neuroscience researchers at Brown will have access to human clinical data gathered during testing of the BrainGate™ Neural Interface System.
News Release   05-012    09/08/2005   Nickel
Bell Gallery Presents the Photography of Kerry Stuart Coppin
Kerry Stuart Coppin’s images of the trans-Atlantic black experience will be on display at the Bell Gallery through October. Coppin, who joined the Brown faculty this fall, has gathered images since 1990 for the exhibit Kerry Stuart Coppin: Materia Oscura/Dark Matter.
News Release   05-017    09/07/2005   Nickel
JAMA Study: Long Hours Equal to Alcohol in Impairing Young Doctors
After long hours on call, medical residents’ performance on attention tests and on a driving simulator was comparable to, or worse than, their performance after consuming moderate amounts of alcohol, according to a study conducted by experts at Brown Medical School and the University of Michigan. Results of the first-ever research are published in JAMA.
News Release   05-018    09/06/2005   Lawton
Sidney Frank Provides $5M To Support Brown's Hurricane Relief Effort
Sidney E. Frank, a 1942 alumnus of Brown University, is providing $5 million in support of the University’s efforts to provide relief for students and faculty at colleges and universities that were damaged by Hurricane Katrina.
News Release   05-021    09/06/2005   Nickel
After Hurricane Katrina: "We are fortunate to be in a position to help"
In an e-mail message to the campus community, Brown President Ruth J. Simmons outlined steps the University is taking in response to the destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina. The text of the President’s message follows here.
News Release   05-016    09/02/2005   Nickel
Biologist Kenneth Miller To Deliver 2005 Opening Convocation Address
Professor of Biology Kenneth R. Miller, known nationally for his support of evolution and the scientific method and for his opposition to creationism or intelligent design in public school science curricula, will deliver the keynote address at Brown University’s 242nd Opening Convocation Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005. The ceremony, in which Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will officially open the 2005-06 academic year, begins at noon on The College Green.
News Release   05-013    09/01/2005   Nickel
Bell Gallery begins year with "Joe Diebes: Song of Transformation"
The David Winton Bell Gallery, located on the first floor of List Art Center, 64 College St., will open its 2005-06 season with two installations by composer and artist Joe Diebes. Joe Diebes: Song of Transformation will run from Sept. 10 through Oct. 30, 2005. An opening reception with a lecture by the artist begins at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9, in the List Auditorium.
News Release   05-011    08/22/2005   Nickel
Brown To Purchase 121 South Main, Former Old Stone Bank Building
Brown University has agreed to purchase 121 South Main Street, the former Old Stone Square. The building, at the foot of College Hill and convenient to University units in the Jewelry District, has 11 floors of commercial space. The University will manage the facility as a fully taxable commercial property and will honor all leases for the foreseeable future.
News Release   05-010    08/12/2005   Nickel
Mesa CC, Brown receive NSF Advanced Technology Education Grant
Supported by a three-year, $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, Mesa Community College (Mesa, Ariz.) and Brown University (Providence, R.I.) will develop pioneering curriculum modules for teaching digital visual literacy. As international culture and commerce become increasingly reliant on visual communications, visual literacy is becoming an essential skill for college graduates. Andries van Dam is co-principal investigator.
News Release   05-009    08/05/2005   Nickel
Researchers Reveal Secret of Key Protein in Brain and Heart Function
Brown University researchers have solved the structure of a critical piece of SAP97, a protein used to keep hearts beating and brains learning. Results, reported by Dale Mierke in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, put science a step closer to understanding how this protein aids in brain and heart function.
News Release   05-006    07/29/2005   Lawton
Brown Grad Student's Seismic Study Shakes Up Plate Tectonics
In a surprising study in Nature, a team led by a Brown University graduate student shows that a sharp boundary exists between the Earth’s hard outermost shell and a more pliable layer beneath, a difference in geological strength underpinning plate tectonic theory. The findings are strong evidence that temperature alone can’t account for differences between the regions, which allow plate tectonics to occur.
News Release   05-005    07/28/2005   Lawton
Op-Ed: Darwin, God, and a Cardinal's Big Mistake
The assertion that the theory of evolution is inherently anti-God is simply wrong. A 2004 document approved by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict, carries a ringing endorsement of the “widely accepted scientific account” of life’s emergence and evolution, describes the descent of all forms of life from a common ancestor as “virtually certain,” and echoes John Paul II’s observation of the “mounting support” for evolution from many fields of study.
News Release   05-004    07/15/2005   Nickel
$1.16-Million Grant Establishes Postdoctoral Program in the Humanities
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has given a five-year, $1.16-million grant to Brown University to establish postdoctoral fellowships in the humanities. In addition to offering professional development to recent Ph.D.s, the program will help establish ties between departments and the University's new Cogut Humanities Center, enrich the curriculum, and promote multidisciplinary research initiatives.
News Release   05-001    07/05/2005   Sweeney
Chafee leads Whitehouse and Brown; Carcieri leads Fogarty
A statewide survey of 470 Rhode Island voters conducted June 25-27, 2005, finds that former Rhode Island Attorney General Sheldon Whitehouse would give incumbent Lincoln Chafee a competitive run in a U.S. Senate race. Additionally, incumbent Gov. Donald Carcieri leads Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty in the governor’s race. The poll also found less optimism about the direction in which the state is headed, compared to a February survey.
News Release   04-150    06/30/2005   Nickel
When It Comes To Cell Entry, Being Average Has Its Advantages
Mid-sized viruses, nanotubes and other bioparticles are more likely to get through receptors, or cellular gates, than smaller or bigger versions. L.B. Freund, professor of engineering at Brown University, and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research have published a model showing an optimal size for cell entry – an idea that can be exploited in drug design – in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   04-149    06/21/2005   Lawton
Corporation of Brown University Elects Nine Trustees
The Corporation of Brown University elected nine trustees at its regular spring meeting Friday, May 27, 2005: Richard A. Friedman, Frederic B. Garonzik, James B. Garvin, Cathy Frank Halstead, Karen M. Levy, Carmen Garcia Rodriguez, Hannelore Rodriguez-Farrar, Charles M. Rosenthal, and William H. Twaddell. The Corporation also accepted major gifts, established three endowed positions and formally approved and adopted the University’s revised policy on intellectual property.
News Release   04-146    06/15/2005   Nickel
Overly Tired Teen? Sleepiness May Signal Serious Health Problem
In a major new report in Pediatrics, doctors who care for young adults are warned that computer games and caffeine may not be the only sources of teen sleep deprivation. Sleep apnea, depression and other medical disorders could be to blame, according to the report by Richard Millman, M.D., and other researchers at Brown University. The report has been endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
News Release   04-145    06/06/2005   Lawton
Five Questions About Intelligent Design
“Intelligent design” is now the subject of constant debate in and around biological circles. Humanists would be happy to help sort things out, if only they could understand what the issues really are. Toward that end, Robert Scholes poses five not entirely rhetorical questions.
Op-Ed   04-142    06/02/2005   Scholes
Bell Gallery Presents Its Summer Exhibition: "in and around us"
Six artists who live and work in New England are represented in the David Winton Bell Gallery’s summer exhibition, in and around us, through July 10, 2005. The exhibition and an opening reception Friday, June 10, at 5:30 p.m. are open to the public without charge.
News Release   04-144    06/02/2005   Nickel
Help Us Find Your Next School Superintendent
A 20-member search committee, chaired by Brown President Ruth J. Simmons, will help find the next superintendent of Providence schools. The committee is asking Providence residents for their best thinking, either through an online questionnaire or at two community forums.
Op-Ed   04-139    05/31/2005   Simmons
Ogden Lecture: “Human Rights and Women’s Rights in Afghanistan”
Dr. Sima Samar, chair of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, delivered a Ste-phen A. Ogden Jr. Ď60 Memorial Lecture on International Relations Saturday, May 28, 2005, in Sayles Hall on the Brown University Campus. The lecture was part of the 35th annual Commencement Forums, offered during the Universityís 237th Commencement. The text of Samar’s address follows here.
News Release   04-143    05/28/2005   Samar
Brown to confer 2,094 degrees at 237th Commencement May 29, 2005
Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will preside at the University’s 237th Commencement exercises Sunday, May 29, 2005, during which 2,094 degrees will be conferred.
News Release   04-141    05/27/2005   Nickel
Sage Morgan-Hubbard and Joshua Wilson To Deliver Senior Orations
Sage Xaxua Morgan-Hubbard of Hyattsville, Md., and Joshua Isaiah Wilson of Haleyville, Ala., will deliver senior orations to their classmates on Sunday, May 29, at 12:20 p.m. in the First Baptist Church in America. Morgan-Hubbard’s address is titled “Story and Voice: Passing on Brown’s Legacy,” and Wilson’s address is titled “Dreams, Diversity and Dixie.”
News Release   04-140    05/26/2005   Montgomery
Exhibition Celebrates Launch of Library’s Public Online Image Database
Imagining America/Imaging America, an exhibition at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, features an eclectic sampling of images newly available to the public through the Archive of Early American Images, the library’s online database of images found in books printed between 1493 and about 1825.
News Release   04-138    05/24/2005   Sweeney
HIV Guidelines Strong Step, But Doctors Need More To Protect Patients
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines for treating patients who have been exposed to HIV through sex or injection drug use are a powerful – but partial – weapon for fighting the spread of the virus, according to a commentary in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   04-135    05/23/2005   Lawton
Harriette Hemmasi Will Join Brown University as University Librarian
Harriette Hemmasi, executive associate dean of libraries at Indiana University–Bloomington, will become the Joukowsky Family University Librarian at Brown University. Hemmasi will oversee the six libraries in the University library system and will provide leadership in supporting the University’s Plan for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   04-133    05/16/2005   Sweeney
Margaret Klawunn to be associate vice president and dean for student life
Margaret Klawunn, who has been serving as interim dean for campus life during the 2004-05 academic year, has been appointed associate vice president and dean for student life. Her appointment is effective July 1, 2005.
News Release   04-136    05/16/2005   Nickel
International Group To Create Clinical Trial Registry Guidelines
On May 23, Brown University professor Kay Dickersin will join a group of international health policy experts in Portland, Ore., to create a blueprint for a global clinical trials registry. Controversy over the effects of antidepressants in children has sparked a move toward registration of drug trials, which could help ensure that research results are complete, accurate and publicly available.
News Release   04-0137    05/16/2005   Lawton
Haffenreffer Museum Opens Permanent Gallery on College Green
A former lecture space in Manning Hall will become a permanent gallery showcasing treasures from the University’s Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology in Bristol, R.I. The gallery opens to the public on May 28 with Warp Speeds.
News Release   04-130    05/12/2005   Sweeney
Anti-Tobacco Advocate To Address 2005 Medical School Graduates
Dileep Bal, M.D., former American Cancer Society president and chief of California’s leading-edge tobacco control program, will address the 30th Brown Medical School graduating class Sunday, May 29, 2005, in the First Unitarian Church. Joseph Diaz, M.D., assistant professor of medicine, will deliver the faculty address, and Robert Gray, a candidate for the M.D. degree, will deliver the student address. Dean of Medicine and Biological Sciences Eli Adashi, M.D., will preside at his first Brown Medical School Commencement.
News Release   04-132    05/12/2005   Lawton
Actress Phylicia Rashad Will Deliver Baccalaureate Address on May 28
Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad will deliver the baccalaureate address to Brown University’s graduating seniors on Saturday, May 28, 2005, at 3:30 p.m. in the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   04-128    05/11/2005   Sweeney
Oskar Eustis Will Speak at Graduate School Convocation May 29
Oskar Eustis, chair of the Brown University/Trinity Repertory Consortium, will deliver “In and of the World,” the Graduate School Commencement address, at 11:15 a.m. Sunday, May 29, 2005, on Lincoln Field. Luk Chong Yeung, a doctoral candidate in physics, will present the student address titled “Our Miracle Year.”
News Release   04-127    05/09/2005   Sweeney
Brown University To Hold 237th Commencement on Sunday, May 29
Brown University’s 237th Commencement will follow a new schedule, with academic exercises taking place on Sunday rather than Monday of Memorial Day Weekend. Chief Marshal Artemis Joukowsky will lead more than 6,000 people down College Hill on Sunday, May 29, 2005, in one of the nation’s largest and most colorful academic pageants. The procession and academic exercises will cap a three-day Commencement/Reunion Weekend on the Brown campus.
News Release   04-124    05/06/2005   Nickel
Researchers Develop Promising New Gene Network Analysis Method
Mapping the interactions between thousands of genes is critical to understanding human development and disease. Leon Cooper and John Sedivy led a research team from Brown University with colleagues at Università di Bologna and Tel Aviv University to develop a sensitive, reliable tool for analyzing these connections, based on an innovative experiment using a notorious cancer protein. The result: potential treatment targets.
News Release   04-125    05/06/2005   Lawton
Could Life Exist on Mars? Answers May Lie in the Otherworldly Environment of a River in Spain
The Rio Tinto is a foul, oozing trickle of a river that muddles its way through southwestern Spain, has the pH of gastric juice, and is awash with pollution, heavy metals, and odd microscopic organisms called extremophiles. It's also where Associate Professor of Geological Sciences John Mustard seeks clues about how and where life might survive on Mars.
   050605h    05/06/2005   Volland
Grant Establishes Brown as Superfund Research Center
The Rio Tinto is a foul, oozing trickle of a river that muddles its way through southwestern Spain, has the pH of gastric juice, and is awash with pollution, heavy metals, and odd microscopic organisms called extremophiles. It's also where Associate Professor of Geological Sciences John Mustard seeks clues about how and where life might survive on Mars.
News Release   050605c    05/06/2005   Lawton
Pierre Mujomba: A Writer in Exile
Pierre Mujomba, Brown's second International Writers Project Fellow, is a writer in exile. "In the Congo, writing is never one's first activity," says the Congolese playwright. "There are no publishers and you won't be published, so most people don't have the courage to write."
   050605e    05/06/2005   Curtis
Sociologist Builds Bridges between Labor, Environmental Activists
Environmentalists, in their zeal to promote ecological health, often alienate the very people who could be their best allies, says Brian Mayer. A doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology, Mayer studies how labor and environmental groups can form lasting alliances.
   050605i    05/06/2005   Whitney
Brown To Host Public Forum on LNG Threat Analysis May 9
Counter-terrorism expert Richard A. Clarke will present his detailed threat analysis of LNG terminals and tanker traffic in Rhode Island waters during a public forum at 3:30 p.m., Monday, May 9, 2005, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The event, sponsored by the Taubman Center for Public Policy and moderated by R.I. Attorney General Patrick C. Lynch, is open to the public without charge.
News Release   04-123    05/04/2005   Nickel
Brown University Will Confer 10 Honorary Degrees on May 29
Brown University will confer 10 honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Sunday, May 29, 2005. Candidates for honorary degrees include artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude, writer David Eggers, philanthropist Sidney E. Frank ’42, astrochemist Wesley Huntress ’64, geneticist Mary-Claire King, actress Phylicia Rashad, financier William Rhodes ’57, human rights activist Sima Samar, and the Rev. Philip Smith, president of Providence College.
News Release   04-126    05/03/2005   Sweeney
Four Brown Faculty Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Poet C.D. Wright, anthropologist David Kertzer, engineer Rodney Clifton and historian Omer Bartov have been elected fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction of excellence in science, scholarship, business, public affairs and the arts.
News Release   04-122    04/28/2005   Lawton
Bill Clinton To Sign Copies of "My Life" at Brown Bookstore April 29
As part of his visit to the Brown University campus, former President William J. Clinton will sign copies of his autobiography, My Life, on Friday, April 29, 2005, from 10:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the Brown Bookstore, on Thayer Street north of Angell Street.
News Release   04-119    04/25/2005   Nickel
Howard Foundation Names Twelve 2005-06 Fellows
The George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation has announced recipients of 12 fellowships for the 2005-06 academic year. The 12 were awarded in literary criticism, film criticism and translation in English. Next year’s fellowships will be awarded in anthropology, sociology and political science. Brown University administers the fellowships on behalf of the Howard Foundation.
News Release   04-120    04/25/2005   Nickel
Brown Summer High School Runs from July 5 through 29
Brown Summer High School, which runs from July 5-29 this year, offers students entering grades 9 through 12 the opportunity to explore a variety of topics. The program costs $100. Enrollment space is limited, and some financial aid is available.
News Release   04-121    04/25/2005   Sweeney
"Works from the Cave II" Immerses Guests into World of Virtual Reality
An interdisciplinary exhibition presented by the David Winton Bell Gallery, the Multimedia and Electronic Music Experiments program, and the Brown Literary Arts program enables guests to stroll through a variety of virtual realities created by students at Brown and the Rhode Island School of Design. The exhibition, Works from the Cave II, runs on two weekends: April 30 and May 1, and May 7 and 8. Reservations are required.
News Release   04-117    04/19/2005   Sweeney
President Clinton To Deliver Policy Address at Brown University April 29
Tickets to President William J. Clinton’s address, “Embracing Our Common Humanity: Security and Prosperity in the 21st Century,” at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 29, 2005, in Meehan Auditorium, will be available to holders of active Brown IDs beginning Monday, April 25. The Brown News Service will issue press credentials for reporters who intend to cover Clinton’s address.
News Release   04-116    04/18/2005   Nickel
Simmons To Host Leadership Alliance Forum on Diversity in Higher Ed
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons will lead a 90-minute briefing and host a Leadership Alliance Presidential Forum Tuesday afternoon, April 19, 2005, at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. During forum sessions after the briefing, college and university presidents will resume structured discussions about diversity trends and challenges in higher education.
News Release   04-114    04/14/2005   Nickel
Pulitzer-winning biographer A. Scott Berg to speak on “Telling Lives”
Biographer A. Scott Berg, winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award for his work, will give the fifth annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture. Berg will speak on “Telling Lives: Writing Biography” Thursday, April 21, 2005, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-115    04/13/2005   Curtis
Brown and Public Health Officials To Test Medical Emergency System
On Friday, April 22, 2005, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Brown University, together with state and city health officials, will conduct an exercise to test the community’s ability to provide emergency medical information, screenings and treatment to large numbers of people. The exercise will take place inside the Pizzitola Memorial Sports Center at the athletic complex, Hope Street at Lloyd Avenue.
News Release   04-113    04/11/2005   Nickel
Brown To Host 2005 Ivy Film Festival and Student Film Competition
Brown University will host the 2005 Ivy Film Festival, featuring entries from student filmmakers throughout the United States and Europe, April 15-17, 2005. Writer/director John Hamburg – maker of such popular films as Meet the Parents and its recent sequel, Meet the Fockers – will give the festival’s keynote address Saturday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The public is welcome.
News Release   04-111    04/06/2005   Curtis
Brown To Present Africana Film Festival at Cable Car Cinema
Brown University will present its second Africana Film festival – featuring 15 films from a dozen countries and an international group of filmmakers, writers and critics – Wednesday through Sunday, April 13-17, 2005, at Cable Car Cinema.
News Release   04-112    04/06/2005   Curtis
Bell Gallery to present photographic exhibits on prison life – and death
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present two photographic exhibitions – One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana and The Omega Suites – April 15 to May 29, 2005. Each exhibition depicts an aspect of U.S. prisons, Photographer Deborah Luster and poet C.D. Wright will discuss their work – One Big Self – during an opening reception Thursday, April 14. Photographer Lucinda Devlin will give a slide lecture on The Omega Suites April 21. Both events and the exhibition are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-110    04/01/2005   Curtis
Max Cleland To Deliver Barnes Lecture at Brown Medical School
Max Cleland, former U.S. senator and decorated Vietnam veteran, will visit Brown University Tuesday, April 5, to deliver the sixth annual Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes Jr. Lecture in Public Health. Cleland will be available for press interviews.
News Release   04-109    03/31/2005   Lawton
Robert Creeley: A major artist in the landscape of American poetry
Faculty colleagues Forrest Gander and C.D. Wright notified students in the Literary Arts Program today of the death of poet Robert Creeley. Creeley had joined the Brown faculty in 2003 as a Distinguished Professor of English.
News Release   04-107    03/30/2005   Nickel
Global Team Member Comments on Landmark Ecosystem Report
Brown University’s Osvaldo Sala, a leading authority on biodiversity and global change, says that the new Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report points up the need for policies that reduce demands on the earth’s resources.
News Release   04-108    03/30/2005   Lawton
Brown Presents "Queer Window: The LGBTQ Film and Video Festival"
Brown University will present Queer Window: The LGBTQ Film and Video Festival April 7 to 10, 2005, at Cable Car Cinema. Headlining the festival will be Brown alumnus Rodney Evans ’93, who will introduce and discuss his film Brother to Brother on Sunday, April 10, at 7:30 p.m.
News Release   04-106    03/29/2005   Curtis
Experts To Discuss ‘Democracy in Middle East: Is It Possible?’
Scholars, journalists and international experts will gather at Brown University April 3 and 4, 2005, for the 25th annual Providence Journal/Brown University Public Affairs Conference titled “Democracy in the Middle East: Is It Possible?” The keynote address, a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. ’60 Memorial Lecture, will be delivered by Saad Eddin Ibrahim, former Egyptian political prisoner and advocate for democracy and human rights. All sessions are open to the public without charge.
News Release   04-104    03/28/2005   Nickel
Sea Skate Experiment Sheds Light on Human Cell Transport
An experiment using the red blood cells of skates – the flat, boneless fish of the sea – has netted a critical finding about how human cells work. Brown University scientist Leon Goldstein and University of Chicago researcher Mark Musch discovered how cellular “gates” are activated to disgorge excess water. The pair believes that the molecular mechanisms that trigger this “release valve” are common to many cells and may provide clues for diabetes and cancer treatment.
News Release   04-105    03/28/2005   Lawton
Luce Scholarship Will Send Mirra Levitt, Class of 2003, to Asia for Year
Mirra Levitt is one of 15 young Americans to receive the Luce Scholarship, an award that will give her the opportunity to live and work in Asia for a year. It is the second time in as many years that a Brown graduate has been selected to receive the prestigious award.
News Release   04-103    03/24/2005   Sweeney
Brown To Host 11th Performance Studies International Conference
Brown University will host Becoming Uncomfortable, the 11th annual Performance Studies international (PSi) conference, March 30 to April 3, 2005. In addition to a full schedule of conference activities for registrants, there will be a wide array of theater, dance and other arts performances in various city venues for the public.
News Release   04-101    03/23/2005   Curtis
Mark Porter Named Chief of Police and Director of Public Safety
Mark J. Porter, currently director of public safety at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, will become Brown University’s chief of police and director of the Department of Public Safety. Porter will begin his duties in April 2005.
News Release   04-098    03/18/2005   Nickel
Brown To Hold Slavery and Justice Conference on “Historical Injustices”
The Brown University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice will host a major academic conference, “Historical Injustices: Restitution and Reconciliation in International Perspective,” Friday, March 18, through Sunday, March 20, 2005. The conference sessions, all free and open to the public, will be held in Smith-Buonanno Hall.
News Release   04-099    03/16/2005   Curtis
Bell Gallery and Visual Art To Present 25th Annual Student Exhibition
The David Winton Bell Gallery and the Department of Visual Art will present the 25th annual Student Exhibition March 19 through April 3, 2005. There will be an opening reception Saturday, March 19, from 8 to 10 p.m. at the gallery. Both the exhibition and the reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-096    03/11/2005   Curtis
The voices of Providence artists: A new oral history exhibition
The John Nicholas Brown Center for the Study of American Civilization is hosting its first exhibition in its new Carriage House Gallery through April 22, 2005. Intimacy and Isolation in Providence: An Installation is a collection of oral histories gathered by students from the city’s artists and institution builders. An opening reception is planned for Thursday, March 10, 2005, from 7 to 9 p.m.
News Release   04-095    03/09/2005   Curtis
University will build 24-hour Friedman Study Center in Sciences Library
A gift from Brown graduates Susan P. and Richard A. Friedman, accepted by the Corporation at its meeting today, will allow the University to move forward with plans to create a 24-hour student study center in the first three levels of the Sciences Library.
News Release   04-093    02/26/2005   Nickel
$20M Gift Will Support Center for Computational Molecular Biology
The Corporation of Brown University has formally accepted a gift that will provide five new pro-fessorships for the Center for Computational Molecular Biology. The Corporation also established new named professorships and accepted other gifts in support of the Plan for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   04-094    02/26/2005   Nickel
Pulitzer-Winning Journalist Seymour Hersh To Give Meiklejohn Lecture
Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter and author Seymour Hersh will give the 39th annual Meiklejohn Lecture Tuesday, March 8, 2005, at 7:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Hersh will speak on “Chain of Command: The Road from 9/11 to Abu Ghraib.” The lecture, sponsored by the Taubman Center, is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-090    02/22/2005   Curtis
Researchers Break New Ground in Their Study of Bacteria
Assistant Professor Jennifer Hughes and graduate student Melissa Lage have found that bacteria follow what ecologists call the "species-area relationship." Their groundbreaking work was published in Nature.
   022005a    02/20/2005   Lawton
Faculty Scholars: Pursuing Knowledge with Passion
A Rhode Island couple will realize their vision of changing people's lives - one mouse click at a time - when a new online philanthropy site created by a handful of Brown students goes live this spring.
   022005c    02/20/2005   Curtis
Public Humanities Initiative, Through Steven Lubar, Pushes Boundaries of Museum Studies
The Public Humanities Initiative, through Steven Lubar, pushes the boundaries of museum studies.
   022005f    02/20/2005   Nickel
Online Philanthropy: From the Clink of a Coin to the Click of a Mouse
A Rhode Island couple will realize their vision of changing people's lives - one mouse click at a time - when a new online philanthropy site created by a handful of Brown students goes live this spring.
   022005d    02/20/2005   Sweeney
Langevin leads Chafee; Carcieri leads all challengers; N.E. Patriots Rule
A statewide survey of 384 Rhode Island voters conducted Feb. 12-13, 2005, finds Rep. James Langevin would lead Sen. Lincoln Chafee in a U.S. Senate race, and Gov. Donald Carcieri leads all challengers for re-election. In sports, one-third of Rhode Islanders expect the Red Sox to repeat as World Series champions; Red Sox fans outnumber Yankees fans six to one; and a majority considers the Patriots a dynasty and expects another Super Bowl victory.
News Release   04-088    02/16/2005   Nickel
JCB Library Presents Exhibition on Native American Origins
The John Carter Brown Library is presenting a new exhibition, Whence Came the Indians? Early European Theories on Native American Origins, through May 1, 2005. The exhibition, prepared by Richard Ring and Dennis Landis, features writings, publications and maps primarily from the 16th and 17th centuries. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-086    02/11/2005   Curtis
President Clinton To Deliver Policy Address at Brown University April 29
Former President Bill Clinton will visit the Brown University campus Friday, April 29, 2005, to deliver a policy address.
News Release   04-084    02/09/2005   Nickel
Brown To Bring Urban Bush Women to PPAC and Black Rep
Brown University will present a performance by the award-winning dance company Urban Bush Women Saturday, Feb. 26, 2005, at 7:30 p.m. at the Providence Performing Arts Center. The troupe will also present a “Hair Party” Friday, Feb. 25, at 6:30 p.m. at the Providence Black Repertory Theatre Company. The public is welcome; tickets are required for both events.
News Release   04-085    02/09/2005   Curtis
Brown offers public events to celebrate Black History Month
Brown University is presenting a series of events, titled What is Black? Addressing Our Divisions, Embracing Our Identities, Unifying Our People, now through March 1, 2005, in observance of Black History Month. All events are open to the public; admission is free, except where a charge is noted.
News Release   04-081    02/04/2005   Curtis
Intermetallic Mystery Solved With Atomic Resolution Microscope
Intermetallics could be the key to faster jets and more efficient car engines. But these heat-resistant, lightweight compounds have stumped scientists for decades. Why do so many break so easily? A team from Brown University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and UES Inc. used the world’s most powerful electron microscope to see, for the first time, atomic details that may provide the answer for the most common class of intermetallics. Their results – which could open the door for new materials for commercial use – are published in the current issue of Science.
News Release   04-080    02/03/2005   Lawton
Creative Arts Council, Hillel to host Caryl Englander photo exhibition
The Brown University Creative Arts Council is joining with the Hillel Project Gallery at the Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center to present Acts of Charity, Deeds of Kindness, an exhibition of photographs by Caryl Englander, Feb. 3 through March 7, 2005. Englander will give a gallery talk on Thursday, Feb. 3 at 5 p.m. at the center; her lecture will be followed by an opening reception at 6 p.m.
News Release   04-079    02/02/2005   Curtis
‘Freedom Now!’ is a rich Web archive of the U.S. struggle for civil rights
Students at Brown University and Tougaloo College have developed a Web-based archive of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the four-decade cooperative exchange between their schools. The “Freedom Now!” project – and the exchange it represents – provides historical documents to help visitors understand and remember a complex history and to see the freedom struggle as ongoing.
News Release   04-077    02/01/2005   Nickel
John Hay Library presents Black Lavender exhibition
The John Hay Library will present Black Lavender: An Exhibit of Writings by Black Gay Men Feb. 8 through March 11, 2005. This exhibition, free and open to the public, features an extensive array of books and periodicals dating from the late 19th century to today, along with photographs, posters and other ephemera. The opening reception, set for Feb. 8 at 5:30 p.m., will feature a lecture by Nigerian poet Julius Sokenu.
News Release   04-078    01/31/2005   Curtis
The need for humanitarian relief in Southeast Asia remains urgent
At the start of the spring semester, Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons urged students, faculty and staff to continue their support for humanitarian relief efforts in Southeast Asia. Brown’s first day of classes was Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2005, one month after the tsunami struck.
News Release   04-075    01/26/2005   Nickel
Bell Gallery to present Long's 'More Like a Dream Than a Scheme'
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition, "More Like a Dream Than a Scheme," featuring the sculptural works of Charles Long, beginning Jan. 29, 2005, and continuing through March 6, 2005. Long will speak at an opening reception that begins at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28. The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-070    01/07/2005   Curtis
Scents and Emotions Linked by Learning, Brown Study Shows
Are we born to love the smell of our mother's skin or do we learn to? A Brown University team has shown that emotional association with scents comes through experience, not genes. The results, published in the International Journal of Comparative Psychology, bolster an increasingly accepted olfaction theory and could be a boon to companies that use scents in marketing.
News Release   04-069    01/05/2005   Lawton
Evolution: You Bet Ė It’s ‘Just’ a Theory
Of course evolution is a theory – the biology textbook already said so. So why did the Cobb County Board of Education order stickers affixed inside the bookís cover, warning students that evolution is a theory? Kenneth Miller, co-author of the textbook and a witness at the trial in federal district court, has a theory ...
Op-Ed   04-073    01/04/2005   Nickel
Shi'aphobia
Widespread fears of gathering Shi'a political strength in Iraq may be unwarranted, writer William O. Beeman. Success for the Iraqi Shi'a could help moderate the more extreme political philosophies of the fundamentalist Iranian regime, contributing to the stability of the region.
News Release   04-068    12/23/2004   Nickel
Electrical Synapses Help the Brain's Master Clock Tick
Many nerve cells in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's master circadian clock, communicate by electrical synapses, according to Brown University research published in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience. The team also found that, in rats and mice, electrical synapses synchronize this critical clock, which helps regulate the daily cycles of sleeping and waking.
News Release   04-065    12/14/2004   Lawton
Manifestations of Shiva: The Burgeoning Indian AIDS Epidemic
India, home to one-sixth of the human race, has an AIDS epidemic, writes Kenneth Mayer. Five million Indians are living with HIV infection. The stakes are high; the government is racing against time.
News Release   04-067    12/14/2004   Nickel
Families Inform Roadmap To Improve Care for Dying in Nursing Homes
End-of-life care in nursing homes often results in unnecessary suffering due mainly to a lack of staff time, training and communication, according to a new AARP study conducted at Brown Medical School. The report lists 15 recommendations to improve care, including more staffing, increased physician presence, additional training and better reimbursement rates.
News Release   04-064    12/13/2004   Lawton
VA Funds Leading-Edge Limb-Loss Research in Providence
The Department of Veteran's Affairs has awarded $7.2 million to the Providence VA Medical Center to establish a broad-based research program to restore natural function to amputees. The chief goal is to create "biohybrid" limbs that meld human tissue with a prosthesis controlled by an amputee's own muscles and brain signals. The Providence VA Medical Center is working with Brown University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to improve the lives of amputees, particularly Iraq war veterans. (A fact sheet on individual research projects is attached.)
News Release   04-061    12/08/2004   Lawton
Free Radicals and Fertilization: Study Reveals Egg Protection Secret
Sea urchin eggs, a common model for human fertility research, create a protein shield just minutes after fertilization. In Developmental Cell, Brown University biologists reveal their discovery of an enzyme that generates hydrogen peroxide, a free radical critical to this protective process. The finding illuminates a survival mechanism shared across species.
News Release   04-063    12/06/2004   Lawton
Nursing Homes Register 41 Percent Drop in Residents' Pain
Pain management for nursing home residents can dramatically improve using a comprehensive, collaborative improvement process – one that quickly changes how staff assess and treat pain. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by researchers at Brown Medical School and Quality Partners of Rhode Island and published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
News Release   04-060    12/03/2004   Lawton
Brown Names Eli Y. Adashi Dean of Medicine and Biological Sciences
Dr. Eli Y. Adashi, currently chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, has been named dean of medicine and biological sciences at Brown University. He will begin his work at Brown Jan. 18, 2005.
News Release   04-058    12/01/2004   Nickel
Brown Lecture Board To Host the Rev. Jesse Jackson
The Brown University Lecture Board will welcome the Rev. Jesse Jackson, civil rights activist and former presidential candidate, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2004, at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Jackson will speak on "The Future of the Democratic Party." Admission requires a Brown ID, but a limited number of seats will be reserved for the press.
News Release   04-059    12/01/2004   Curtis
Mark V. Pauly to speak on health benefits for workers and retirees
Mark V. Pauly, professor of economics, health care systems, business and public policy, insurance and risk management at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, will discuss "Shooting Ourselves in the Foot? Employers and Health Benefits for Workers and Retirees" Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2004, at 5 p.m. in MacMillan Hall. This event, free and open to the public, is the annual Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care Lecture.
News Release   04-056    11/19/2004   Curtis
Controlling movement through thought alone
A 25-year-old quadriplegic is switching on lights, changing television channels and reading e-mail using only his mind, thanks to a neuroprosthetic device called Braingate, developed in the laboratory of John Donoghue.
GSJ Story   29GSJ05c    11/19/2004   Lawton
Antipsychotic Drugs Stop Fatal Viral Infection in Brain Cells
Scientists from Brown University and Case Western Reserve University have discovered a way to prevent brain cells from becoming infected by the JC virus, a common bug that can cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or PML, a fatal nervous system disorder that strikes AIDS patients and others with suppressed immune systems. Their work, published in Science, reveals a surprising cellular defender: antipsychotic drugs.
News Release   04-055    11/18/2004   Lawton
Bogues, Bonde and Fischer Named Inaugural Royce Family Professors
Brown University has appointed Barrymore Bogues, professor of Africana studies; Sheila Bonde, professor of the history of art and architecture; and Karen Fischer, professor of geological sciences, as the inaugural Royce Family Professors of Teaching Excellence. They will serve three-year terms, through June 30, 2007.
News Release   04-054    11/15/2004   Nickel
Eighteen Brown Faculty Members Appointed to Named Professorships
Brown celebrates the appointment of 18 faculty to named chairs and welcomes 16 senior scholars to the faculty ranks. Faculty honored with named chairs include David M. Berson, Barrymore A. Bogues, Sheila Bonde, Stuart Burrows, Alfred E. Buxton, Thalia Field, Karen Fischer, Aaron Friedman, Timothy Harris, Jennifer Hughes, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Rene Nuenlist, Daniel J. Smith, David Sobel, Richard Stratt, Hui Wang, John Edgar Wideman, and George Yap.
News Release   04-053    11/10/2004   Nickel
Pulitzer-Winning Columnist David S. Broder To Speak on U.S. Politics
Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist David S. Broder, a national political correspondent for The Washington Post, will give the Gov. Frank Licht Lecture Monday, Nov. 29, 2004, at 7:30 p.m. in Starr Auditorium in MacMillan Hall. Broder will speak on "American Politics: 2004 and Beyond." The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-052    11/09/2004   Curtis
Alexander Calder's Tripes begins a two-year visit at Brown
The Public Art Committee has arranged to bring Tripes, a sculpture by American artist Alexander Calder, to the Brown campus for public exhibit during the next two years. The sculpture will be installed near Carrie Tower on the University's Front Green Friday, Nov. 5, 2004, weather permitting.
News Release   04-048    11/02/2004   Curtis
Brown to host international Holocaust conference Nov. 4-7, 2004
Brown University will host the eighth biennial Lessons and Legacies international conference on the Holocaust, "From Generation to Generation," Nov. 4-7, 2004, at the Providence Marriott Hotel and on the Brown campus. The media is welcome to attend conference sessions.
News Release   04-050    11/02/2004   Curtis
Sarah Doyle Gallery exhibits Jessica E. Ritter's "Sugar Coated"
The Sarah Doyle Women's Center will host a new exhibition of the work of artist Jessica E. Ritter, titled "Sugar Coated," in its gallery at 26 Benevolent St., beginning Nov. 1 and continuing through Nov. 30, 2004. There will be an artist's reception Thursday, Nov. 4, at 6 p.m. Both the exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-046    10/27/2004   Curtis
NPR's Mara Liasson to speak Nov. 11 on "Election 2004"
Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for National Public Radio, will discuss "Election 2004: A Washington Insider's View," part of the John Hazen White Sr. Lecture Series, Thursday, Nov. 11, 2004, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-047    10/27/2004   Curtis
Geoffrey Stone to speak on "Civil Liberties in Wartime" Tuesday, Nov. 9
First Amendment expert and author Geoffrey Stone will speak on "Civil Liberties in Wartime" Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2004, at 6 p.m. in Starr Auditorium, MacMillan Hall. This lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-045    10/21/2004   Curtis
Bell Gallery to present exhibition of contemporary Chinese art
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present Regeneration: Contemporary Chinese Art from China and the U.S., a traveling exhibition featuring the work of 26 artists, Nov. 6 through Dec. 23, 2004. A lecture and opening reception are scheduled for Nov. 11. A second lecture is set for Nov. 15. The exhibition, reception and lectures are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-044    10/20/2004   Curtis
Katherine Farley Elected to Board of Trustees of the Brown Corporation
Katherine G. Farley, senior managing director at Tishman Speyer Properties, was elected by the Corporation of Brown University to a six-year term as a trustee. Farley and five other new trustees were formally engaged as members of the Board of Trustees during the Corporation's regular fall meeting Saturday, Oct. 16, 2004.
News Release   04-036    10/16/2004   Nickel
John Carter Brown Library hosts 19th-century book collecting exhibition
The John Carter Brown Library is presenting a new exhibition, "A Matter of Taste: Discrimination in 19th-Century Book Collecting," now through Jan. 5, 2005, in the library on The College Green. The exhibition is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-040    10/15/2004   Curtis
Bernstein and Hopmann awarded Fulbright Scholar grants
P. Terrance Hopmann, professor of political science, and Susan Bernstein, associate professor of comparative literature, have been awarded Fulbright Scholar grants for the 2004-05 academic year. The program will also bring two visiting scholars to Brown this year: Talal Wehbe of Lebanon and Luis Nuno Valdez Faria Rodrigues of Portugal.
News Release   04-038    10/14/2004   Curtis
Herschel Grossman, the Merton P. Stoltz Professor in the Social Sciences
Herschel Grossman, professor of economics at Brown University, died suddenly Oct. 9, 2004, while attending an academic conference in France. A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24, at Brown Hillel, 80 Brown St. (corner of Brown and Angell). A reception will follow. Editors: A photograph is available through the News Service.
News Release   04-041    10/14/2004   Nickel
Strict and loose construction: A decent respect to the opinions of mankind
The Declaration of Independence was in part an outreach to nations of the world – an international explanation of actions the Americans were about to undertake. What might a strict constructionist reading of our nation's earliest document tell us about political life in the 21st century?
News Release   04-037    10/13/2004   Nickel
Pilot Study of Mind-to-Movement Device Shows Early Promise
A 25-year-old quadriplegic is switching on lights, changing television channels and reading e-mail using only his mind, thanks to a neuroprosthetic device developed using Brown University research. These initial clinical trial results will be presented today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Phoenix.
News Release   04-035    10/08/2004   Lawton
New Model Shows Calcium Control Is Key for Synapse Homeostasis
When memories are made and learning occurs, the connections between brain cells change. Scientists know that an influx of calcium is critical to this process. A theoretical model developed by a Brown University research team led by Luk Chong Yeung shows that cells’ ability to fine-tune this calcium flow not only sparks changes in synapses but also allows cells to maintain a working state of equilibrium.
News Release   04-034    10/07/2004   Lawton
Poet C.D. Wright named 2004 MacArthur Fellow
C.D. Wright, poet and professor of English at Brown University, has been named a MacArthur Fellow for 2004 by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Wright will receive $500,000 in "no strings attached support during the next five years.
News Release   04-032    09/28/2004   Curtis
E-Government in Denver and San Diego Ranks Among Nation's Best Cities
A study of the 70 largest metropolitan government Web sites shows city governments vary enormously in the extent to which they are placing electronic information and services online and maintaining basic protections for privacy, security and disability access. A ranking urban government Web sites is included.
News Release   04-030    09/27/2004   Nickel
Sarah Doyle Gallery Presents Exhibit by Photographer Deana Lawson
The Sarah Doyle Women's Center will host a new exhibition of work by photographer Deana Lawson, titled "Matters of Grace," in its gallery at 26 Benevolent St. The exhibition opens Monday, Oct. 4, and continues through Friday, Oct. 29, 2004. There will be an artist's reception Thursday, Oct. 7, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Both the exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-031    09/27/2004   Curtis
Spreading the gospel of locally-grown
It started with the apples, crisp Cortlands and Macs from a Massachusetts orchard. Then came the local peaches and peppers, basil and squash. Then the farmer's market arrived on Wriston Quad. Now, there is Roots & Shoots at the Ratty. Want to know about Brown's sustainable food efforts? Recent graduate Louella Hill's got the dirt.
GSJ Story   29GSJ02b    09/24/2004   Lawton
Smoke Interns tackle international issues
A look at the Smoke summer interns. Each received funding to conduct research, advocacy and/or service related to a contemporary global problem. One intern spent his summer working with the UN in an Africal refugee camp; another worked in the Caribbean with young people.
GSJ Story   29GSJ02c    09/24/2004   Curtis
Teaching the arts to Dominican children: an intern's account
Smoke intern Annemarie Guzy '05 spent three months volunteering for the Dominican Dream Project, a nonprofit organization that works to improve the education of poor children in the Dominican Republic by donating supplies, building new facilities and placing volunteers in classrooms. Guzy, a music and English concentrator, taught at the LaColonia School and a summer camp. She shares her experience in this first-person account.
GSJ Story   29GSJ02d    09/24/2004   Freelance
Faculty growth: a new sense of what is possible
When it comes to faculty hiring, the news is good, according to Dean of the Faculty Rajiv Vohra. After a decade of steady-state hiring, where arrivals and departures were roughly equal, the faculty has grown nearly 9 percent in the last three years. The George Street Journal talked with Vohra about the progress.
GSJ Story   29GSJ02e    09/24/2004   Nickel
Brown Research Reveals Key Insight into Memory-Making
Brain cells in the hippocampus make new long-term memories using a synapse-strengthening process called long-term potentiation, or LTP. In the current issue of Science, Brown University and Duke University Medical Center researchers shed new light on this critical brain function, describing where AMPA receptors are stored and how they are activated during LTP.
News Release   04-026    09/23/2004   Lawton
James Garvin and Wen-Hsiung Li to speak, receive alumni awards
Chief NASA scientist James B. Garvin and Balzan Award-winning mathematician Wen-Hsiung Li, both Brown alumni, will be honored by the Brown Alumni Association and the Brown Graduate School with their most prestigious awards Saturday, Oct. 2, 2004. Garvin and Li will each give public lectures that day at 2:45 p.m. -- Garvin in the Salomon Center for Teaching and Li in the List Art Center auditorium.
News Release   04-029    09/23/2004   Curtis
Providence Residents Not Very Worried About Terrorist Attacks
A public opinion survey of 432 adults in Providence indicates that more than two-thirds of city residents are not worried about a terrorist attack harming them or a family member next year. Twenty-eight percent say they keep emergency supplies on hand, and 41 percent say they try to watch out for people who look or act like terrorists.
News Release   04-028    09/22/2004   Nickel
Tennessee, Maine Lead States; Social Security Leads Federal Agencies
A study of digital government in the 50 states and major federal agencies ranks Tennessee and Maine first and second among the states and FirstGov (the U.S. portal) and the Social Security Administration first and second among federal sites. The rankings are based on data gathered by researchers at Brown University during summer 2004. Tables for states and federal agencies are included.
News Release   04-027    09/20/2004   Nickel
Slavery and Justice Committee to host lecture by John Hope Franklin
The Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice will sponsor a lecture, titled "An Open Letter to Jonathan Doe: Reflections on Racial Inequality in America," by distinguished historian John Hope Franklin Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2004, at 7:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching on The College Green. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-021    09/15/2004   Curtis
Taiwan, Singapore lead U.S. and Canada in online government
A study of digital government finds that 198 nations around the world are making steady progress at putting services and information online, but movement forward has been slowed because of budget, bureaucratic and institutional factors. The United States and Canada rank third and fourth behind Taiwan and Singapore. A table ranking the governmental Web efforts of 198 countries follows below.
News Release   04-020    09/13/2004   Nickel
Thomas W. Berry Named Chair of the Brown Annual Fund
Thomas W. Berry, Brown Class of 1969, has been named chair of the Brown Annual Fund. The Brown Annual Fund, which has enjoyed record-setting growth in the last three years, is an important source of support for the University's Plan for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   04-022    09/13/2004   Nickel
Antidepressants and kids: Safety starts with sound health services
The debate about prescribing antidepressants for children and adolescents has raised many good questions about how research is funded and how results are reported. It has also exposed a misplaced preference for a pharmacological "magic bullet" over a more comprehensive approach that includes "talk therapy." The real problem is not the pills but a system of mental health care that does not deliver the careful treatment and follow-up young patients need.
News Release   04-019    09/10/2004   Lawton
Brown Receives $20M in Gifts To Establish Campus Fitness Center
Lead gifts from three Brown alumni will allow the University to establish a campus fitness center. Brown President Ruth J. Simmons announced the gifts and the new center during her remarks at the University's 241st Opening Convocation on Tuesday.
News Release   04-015    09/08/2004   Nickel
Watson Institute To Present Symposium, Exhibit on Global Networks
The Watson Institute for International Studies will host a symposium, "The Power and Pathology of Networks," as part of its Information Technology, War and Peace Project, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 10-11, 2004. Public radio commentator Christopher Lydon will moderate the opening session on Sept. 10 at 1:30 p.m. The symposium is free and open to the public, except where an admission fee is noted.
News Release   04-018    09/08/2004   Curtis
Former Presidential Candidate Howard Dean To Speak Sept. 9
Howard Dean, the former Democratic presidential contender and Vermont governor, will speak on "The Long-Term Implications of the 2004 Presidential Election" when he delivers the 2004 Noah Krieger Memorial Lecture Thursday, Sept. 9, 2004, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   04-014    09/02/2004   Nickel
Welfare-to-Work System Challenged To Serve New Areas of Need
Political Scientist Scott W. Allard found evidence of emerging mismatches between areas experiencing increasing rates of poverty and the locations of social services. Because social services are central to the current welfare system, proximity to providers has never been more critical.
News Release   04-010    08/30/2004   Cole
Bell Gallery To Present InVisible Silence International Group Exhibition
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a new group exhibition titled InVisible Silence Sept. 11 through Oct. 26, 2004, featuring artists from Israel, Brazil, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Japan and the United States. An opening reception is set for Friday, Sept. 10; participating artist Yael Bartana will discuss her work on a date and time yet to be announced. Both events and the exhibition are free and open to the public.
News Release   04-012    08/27/2004   Curtis
Anthropologist Kay Warren To Address New Students Sept. 7
Political anthropologist and Latin Americanist Kay Warren will deliver the Opening Convocation address Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2004, at noon on The College Green. Brown welcomes 1,434 first-year students, 420 graduate students, 77 medical students, 112 transfer students and eight Resumed Undergraduate Education students to the 241st academic year.

The text of Warren's address is now available online.
News Release   04-011    08/26/2004   Cole
Study: In Post-9/11 Atmosphere of War, Voters Favor Male Candidates
When America is waging its war on terrorism, citizens are more apt to vote for male candidates. A survey of 2,119 people completed a year after Sept. 11, 2001, found voters prefer men's perceived leadership traits and characteristics.
News Release   04-006    08/13/2004   Cole
Malaria drug blocks brain conduits, a boon for neuroscience research
A common treatment for malaria shuts down two kinds of connexins, protein "tunnels" that transfer information between nerve cells, according to research conducted at Brown University and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Published in this week's online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the finding will help scientists plumb the secrets of connexins – crucial electrical conduits found in the brain, heart and other organs.
News Release   04-009    08/06/2004   Lawton
Two enzymes key to calorie-burning, Brown research shows
A Brown-led research team has discovered a pair of universal switches in the brain that tell the body to stop eating and start burning calories. Tripped by leptin, these essential enzymes activate other chemical messengers that send metabolism-boosting signals from the brain to the body. The discovery, highlighted in the current issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, can be used to create new treatments for obesity, one of the nation's most pressing health problems.
News Release   04-008    08/02/2004   Lawton
Brown names Neil D. Steinberg as vice president for development
Neil D. Steinberg, chairman and CEO of Fleet Bank--Rhode Island, has been named vice president for development and campaign director at Brown University. As the University's chief development officer, Steinberg will direct the University's next comprehensive campaign, which will support the University's Plan for Academic Enrichment. He will begin his work at Brown on Aug. 23, 2004.
News Release   04-007    07/30/2004   Nickel
Brown and Harvard team identifies potential target for obesity drugs
A quick and potent peptide produced in the base of the brain is the key to revving up metabolism – helping people burn calories and lose weight, researchers at Brown and Harvard medical schools have discovered. Published in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of July 26, the research identifies a new target for drug makers hunting for an obesity pill.
News Release   04-005    07/26/2004   Lawton
Med School team takes part in milestone study on fetal surgery
Brown Medical School faculty members Francois Luks, a pediatric surgeon, and Stephen Carr, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, were the sole US participants in a groundbreaking international research trial aimed at testing the benefit of fetal surgery for a disease or defect.
GSJ Story   28GSJ21c    07/23/2004   Lawton
Leadership Alliance secures grant to suppport symposium
The Leadership Alliance has landed a five-year $1.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to support its National Symposium, an annual event where minority undergraduates from across the country present findings from scientific research projects.
GSJ Story   28GSJ21e    07/23/2004   Lawton
Brown's political scientists study the issues and process of Election 2004
Brown University's political scientists are studying the issues, the media, the money and the political process at the state and national levels during this election year. Faculty experts are available for interview on a wide variety of topics and research areas.
News Release   04-003    07/15/2004   Cole
NLRB decision says graduate students are not statutory employees
The National Labor Relations Board has upheld Brown University's argument on appeal that graduate teaching assistants are students -- not statutory employees -- and are therefore not an appropriate unit for collective bargaining. The NLRB reversed a November 2001 decision by its regional director to order an election and dismissed the original petition filed by the United Auto Workers Union.
News Release   04-004    07/15/2004   Nickel
Donkey mural coming down from library
The photoraphic mural that has been on the side of the Science Library will be removed a bit early to protect it from potential hurricane damage. The reaction to the mural far exceed Brown officials' expectations.
GSJ Story   28GSJ20c    07/09/2004   Curtis
Friedman chairs Medical School's pediatrics department
Aaron Friedman, M.D., is the new Sylvia Kay Hassenfeld Professor of Pediatrics and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the Medical School and the new pediatrician-in-chief at Hasbro Children's.
GSJ Story   28GSJ20d    07/09/2004   Lawton
R.I. prisoners transmit hepatitis B at alarming rate, researcher finds
After two years of study, Grace Macalino, assistant professor of community health, and her research team found that inmates entering Rhode Island prisons have high rates of HIV and hepatitis. Once in prison, male prisoners pass on the hepatitis B virus at alarming rates.
GSJ Story   28GSJ20e    07/09/2004   Lawton
Through Pembroke Center, Turkish scholar probed deeper into honor crimes
As a postdoctoral fellow at Brown's Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Dicle Kogacioglu had the opportunity to further her exploration of the issue of honor crimes - the murder of a woman by members of her family who do not approve of her sexual behavior.
GSJ Story   28GSJ20f    07/09/2004   Sweeney
New MRI machine has research mission
A 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine has been installed at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island's Southeastern Medical Center in Pawtucket for use in osteoarthritis study. Later this year it will accommodate brain research.
GSJ Story   28GSJ20g    07/09/2004   Lawton
Hepatitis B transmission high in Rhode Island prisons, study shows
In the first study to gauge the risks of contracting HIV and hepatitis in Rhode Island prisons, Brown University researchers found that a significant number of men get the hepatitis B virus behind bars – a finding that led the team to call for prison-wide vaccinations. Results are published in the current edition of the American Journal of Public Health.
News Release   04-001    07/02/2004   Lawton
Paola Pivi's donkey mural will leave the Sciences Library July 15
The exhibition of artist Paola Pivi's untitled mural of a donkey riding in a rowboat, currently displayed on the exterior face of the Sciences Library at Brown University, will conclude July 15, 2004. Concerned for the painting's safety, the University decided to remove it prior to the late-summer hurricane season.
News Release   03-158    06/29/2004   Curtis
Aaron L. Friedman, M.D., named chief and chair of pediatrics
Aaron L. Friedman, M.D., is pediatrician-in-chief at Hasbro Children's Hospital and the Sylvia Kay Hassenfeld Professor of Pediatrics and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Brown Medical School.
News Release   03-159    06/29/2004   Lawton
Nursing home quality: Public reporting can't replace public policy
Going public with quality and inspection data isn't a prescription for better nursing home care, write Vincent Mor and Jacqueline Zinn. Proactive public policy is required to improve the lives of the estimated 1.6 million elderly in nursing homes in the United States.
News Release   03-160    06/29/2004   Lawton
AIDS conference in Bangkok will draw on Brown researchers' international focus
Ten Brown faculty members will present research and learn new ways to fight the pandemic, and new international guidelines for antiretroviral treatment, written in part by Charles Carpenter, a physician and professor of medicine, will be released.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19b    06/25/2004   Lawton
Ringing the Commencement Bell has its ups and downs
One of the most coveted posts during Commencement Weekend is not on any stage. It's up in the First Baptist Church in America, where a crew of five rings the bell during Baccalaureate and Commencement processions.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19d    06/25/2004   Cole
Book cover fit for a lab draws truth and beauty from Cooper's lab
This winter, Leon Cooper phoned Richard Fishman and said: "Let's make something elegant." The fruit of that phone call is a pulsing, painterly computer-generated collage used on the latest book by Cooper and colleagues. The image is testament to the connection between science and art - and the bond between two of Brown's best-known faculty members.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19e    06/25/2004   Lawton
Bell Gallery presents "Fabric of Light"
Providence-area artists explore the dynamics of fabric and light in an intriguing exhibition at the David Winton Bell Gallery through July 11. Titled "The Fabric of Light," the exhibit features the recent work of Searles, Nina Cinelli, Esther Solondz and Cynthia Treen.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19g    06/25/2004   Curtis
JCB presents exhibition on Haitian Revolution
The John Carter Brown Library is presenting a new exhibition, titled Haitian Revolution, 1789-1804, from mid-May through Sept. 15. The exhibition features pamphlets, maps and prints that illustrate the story narrated by participants and observers of the revolution.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19h    06/25/2004   Curtis
Take that, Simon Cowell; Brown's "Ivy Idol" delivers CD-load of talent
Hollywood hit campus in "Ivy Idol," the University's true-life takeoff of "American Idol" held on Staff Development Day.
GSJ Story   28GSJ19i    06/25/2004   Lawton
Brown receives major collection of 20th-century literary works
Brown University alumnus Mel B. Yoken has donated his collection of writings by hundreds of late-20th-century American, French, English and Quebecois authors and public figures. Comprising more than 25,000 books, letters, notes and personal papers, the collection is housed in the John Hay Library.
News Release   03-156    06/23/2004   Cole
More African-Americans get poor nursing home care, study finds
In the first comprehensive, national study to investigate race, income and nursing home quality, Brown University researchers found that African-Americans are four times as likely as whites to live in poorly-funded, understaffed nursing homes. The study appears in the current issue of the health policy journal "Milbank Quarterly."
News Release   03-154    06/21/2004   Lawton
Corporation accepts gift, approves planning for new academic building
A $20-million gift from New York businessman Sidney Frank -- the largest single gift for a building ever made to Brown University -- will allow Brown to proceed with planning and construction of a new academic building and a large, landscaped urban green space on Angell Street. At its meeting May 29, 2004, the Brown Corporation accepted the gift and authorized planning for the project to proceed.
News Release   03-150    06/14/2004   Nickel
Ricky A. Gresh named director of student activities at Brown
Ricky A. Gresh, currently assistant dean/assistant director of student life programs at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will begin his duties as director of student activities at Brown University in July. He succeeds David Inman.
News Release   03-152    06/14/2004   Sweeney
Corporation elects five members to six-year terms on Board of Trustees
The Corporation of Brown University has elected five new members to its Board of Trustees: Thomas W. Berry, of Chatham, N.J.; James J. Burke Jr., of New York City; Alison Ressler, of Los Angeles; Charles M. Royce, of Greenwich, Conn.; and Marta Tienda, of Princeton, N.J.
News Release   03-146    06/03/2004   Nickel
Insulin plays central role in aging, Brown scientists discover
The life expectancy of fruit flies increases an average of 50 percent when signals within cells of fat tissue are blocked or altered, new Brown University research shows. Published in the current issue of Nature, results of the study suggest that reduced levels of insulin in one tissue regulates insulin throughout the body to slow aging -- a finding that brings science one step closer to cracking the longevity code.
News Release   03-149    06/02/2004   Lawton
Brown to confer 2,104 degrees at 236th Commencement May 31, 2004
Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will preside at the University's 236th Commencement exercises Monday, May 31, 2004, during which 2,104 degrees will be conferred.
News Release   03-148    05/29/2004   Nickel
Bell Gallery to present work of local artists in The "Fabric of Light"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition titled "The Fabric of Light," featuring the work of local artists Nina Cinelli, Cristin Searles, Esther Solondz and Cynthia Treen, opening June 12 and continuing through July 11, 2004. An opening event Friday, June 11, at 5:30 p.m. will feature a performance of Cinelli's the dance. Both the performance and the exhibition are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-144    05/28/2004   Curtis
Scholarly pursuits: A sampling of students' doctoral theses
A look at the research done by three Ph.D. graduates: Sarah Alexander Chase, Brenda Foley and Brian Zugay
GSJ Story   28GSJ18b    05/28/2004   Curtis
Brown study wins Ecological Society of America prize
A 2001 study written by then-graduate students John Williams and Bryan Shuman, and Professor of Geological Sciences Thompson Webb III, has been awarded the 2004 William S. Cooper Award, the Ecological Society of America's highest honor for book- or paper-length research in plant ecology.
GSJ Story   28GSJ18b    05/28/2004   Howell
Mapping the curriculum: online project helps visualize interdisciplinary relationships
The CRISTALS project (for Context-Rich Interactive Student Teaching and Learning System) is an attempt to find better ways to visualize and explore the full sweep of Brown's curriculum in new ways.
GSJ Story   28GSJ18d    05/28/2004   Freelance
Elmo lives on: Once-mighty elm inspires student artists
Elmo, the tree outside of the Watson Institute that succumbed to Dutch elm disease, is living on through The Elm Tree Project, a collaborative effort between Brown and Rhode Island School of Design that will encompass a series of courses, exhibitions, performances and events - all inspired by Brown's elm and by the larger issues of nature, ecology and the environment.
GSJ Story   28GSJ18g    05/28/2004   Curtis
Brown faculty will grow by more than three dozen
The 2004-05 academic year will bring continued change to the Brown faculty, improving diversity, increasing the size of the faculty, and supporting the University's initiatives in new multidisciplinary centers. As of May 27, according to preliminary information from the Office of the Dean of the Faculty, 40 candidates had accepted faculty appointments.
GSJ Story   28GSJ18h    05/28/2004   Nickel
Brown junior has role in creating city's security plan
By identifying shelter and inoculation sites for Providence residents in case of an emergency, Brown junior Kerry Meath has helped the City of Providence create a Homeland Security plan.
GSJ Story   28GSJ18j    05/28/2004   Cole
Jonathan Doris, M.D., ‘Scrubs' advisor, to address M.D. graduating class
Jonathan Doris, M.D., former resident in internal medicine at Brown and current technical consultant to the NBC sitcom "Scrubs," will address the medical graduating class at 8:45 a.m. Monday, May 31, 2004, in the First Unitarian Church. George Goslow Jr., professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, will deliver the faculty address, and Kerri Nottage, a candidate for the M.D. degree, will deliver the student address.
News Release   03-138    05/20/2004   Nickel
Cell division can be halted in multiple ways, with implications for cancer
Brown University researchers have found that at least two molecular mechanisms trigger senescence, a cellular process associated with aging and a key to understanding cancer and age-related illnesses. Their research is reported in the current edition of the journal Molecular Cell.
News Release   03-141    05/20/2004   Lawton
Summit will explore technology transfer between academia, industry
Leaders from industrial research laboratories, academia and the government will gather at Brown University on Monday, May 24, to address the future of corporate research and the role of universities. This summit, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Department of Computer Science's Industrial Partners Program.
News Release   03-140    05/18/2004   Sweeney
Scents will not rouse us from slumber, says new Brown University study
Smells do not wake people, according to Brown University researchers who studied responses to the scents peppermint and pyridine -- a common byproduct of fire. The findings indicate a significant alteration of perceptual processing as a function of sleep.
News Release   03-139    05/17/2004   Cole
Brown's once-mighty "Elmo" is preserved in artists' projects
"Elmo," the majestic American elm tree that once defined the Thayer Street entrance to the Watson Institute, succumbed last year to an advanced case of Dutch elm disease and was taken down to prevent the disease from spreading. Now, in an innovative exercise in recycling and preservation, wood from the tree is providing inspiration for The Elm Tree Project and a series of courses at Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design.
News Release   03-137    05/14/2004   Curtis
Brown selects two seniors to deliver Commencement orations
Russell Baruffi of Vineland, N.J., and Marian Thorpe of Spokane, Wash., will deliver senior orations during Brown's 236th Commencement, Monday, May 31, 2004, at 10:30 a.m. in the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   03-133    05/10/2004   Montgomery
Four professors in national spotlight for their teaching, research
Four Brown professors have been honored by national organizations this spring for their work: Amy Greenwald of computer science and Ian Dell'Antonio of physics received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers; Thomas Banchoff of mathematics is a recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Scholar Award; Elliot Colla of comparative literature has been selected by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to receive a New Directions Fellowship.
GSJ Story   28GSJ17    05/07/2004   Cole
Spring Dance Concert 2004
Artists-in-residence will bring their cultural traditions and personal talent to the stage when the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance presents it popular annual Dance Ensemble Spring Concert May 6 to 8 at 8 p.m. and May 9 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. in Stuart Theatre.
GSJ Story   28GSJ17c    05/07/2004   Curtis
Six op-ed voices on "The Changing Face of Immigration"
"Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration," a recent public affairs conference at Brown University, focused on immigration in the United States after Sept. 11, 2001. At the University's invitation, several conference speakers prepared op-ed pieces on immigration issues. These are available through the Brown News Service.
News Release   03-127    05/05/2004   Howell
Who does the housework affects whether couples have a second child
In dual-earner couples, the probability of having a second child varies substantially according to the division of housework, says a new Brown University study in Population Development and Review. Researchers studied 265 dual-earner married couples in the United States.
News Release   03-130    05/05/2004   Cole
Brown University will confer nine honorary degrees on May 31
Brown University will confer nine honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Monday, May 31, 2004. The recipients are Fernando Henrique Cardoso, former president of Brazil; philanthropist Malcolm G. Chace; Shirin Ebadi, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize; Paul Farmer, M.D.; playwright Suzan-Lori Parks; journalist Jane Pauley; Brown University Chancellor Stephen Robert; Judith Rodin, president of the University of Pennsylvania; and cartoonist Garry Trudeau.
News Release   03-126    05/04/2004   Sweeney
Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi to deliver baccalaureate address
Iranian lawyer and human rights activist Shirin Ebadi will address graduating seniors at Brown's baccalaureate service on Sunday, May 30, 2004, at 1:30 p.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America. Seating is limited to graduating seniors; the service will be simulcast to The College Green.
News Release   03-128    05/04/2004   Cole
Overview: Brown University to hold 236th Commencement Monday, May 31
More than 6,000 people will march down College Hill on Memorial Day, May 31, 2004, in one of the nation's largest and most colorful academic pageants. The procession and academic exercises cap a four-day Commencement/Reunion Weekend on the Brown campus.
News Release   03-131    05/04/2004   Nickel
Data from deep underground experiment narrows sights on dark matter
Richard Gaitskell, assistant professor of physics at Brown University and head of Brown's particle astrophysics group, is a leading member of a U.S. research collaboration that is trying to directly detect particle "ark matter." The collaboration's detectors, cooled to less than one-tenth of a degree above absolute zero, operate half a mile beneath the earth's surface in an historic iron mine in Northern Minnesota.
News Release   03-129    05/03/2004   Nickel
Banchoff recalls Salvador Dali's friendship for documentary celebrating artist's centennial
The memories of meeting the flamboyant artist Salvador Dali and the ensuing decade-long friendship are particularly fresh in geometer Thomas Banchoff's mind these days as Europe celebrates the centennial of Dali's birth with major retrospective exhibitions, symposiums and other events. Banchoff is working with a crew filming "The Dali Dimension," a documentary to air in Europe this fall.
GSJ Story   28GSJ16b    04/30/2004   Sweeney
Bilingual Brown students act as medical interpreters at RI Hospital
For the past seven years, bilingual Brown students have volunteered in the adult and pediatric emergency rooms of Rhode Island Hospital providing translation at such critical moments.
GSJ Story   28GSJ16c    04/30/2004   Cole
Team Brown helps renovate Providence club, school
Sixty members of the Brown community spent a recent Saturday refurbishing the Fox Point Boys/Girls Club and the Alfred Lima Sr. Elementary School in Providence as part of the national volunteer program Rebuilding Together, formerly known as Christmas in April.
GSJ Story   28GSJ16e    04/30/2004   Montgomery
David A. Greene named VP for campus life and student services
David A. Greene, currently serving as interim vice president, has been named vice president for campus life and student services. His appointment is effective July 1, 2004.
News Release   03-124    04/28/2004   Nickel
Slavery and justice: We seek to discover the meaning of our past
Brown University's Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice will investigate and discuss an uncomfortable piece of the University's -- and our nation's -- history. The Committee's work is not about whether or how reparations should be paid, writes Brown President Ruth J. Simmons. Rather, it will do the difficult work of scholarship, debate and civil discourse, demonstrating how difficult, uncomfortable and valuable this process can be.
News Release   03-103    04/26/2004   Nickel
Brown music ensembles to perform with Grammy winner Joe Lovano
The Brown University Music Department will present the 2004 Sara and Robert A. Reichley Concert -- Viva Jazz! -- featuring the Brown Jazz Band on Friday, May 7, 2004, at 8 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. The program will also feature the Jazz Band and the Brown Wind Symphony performing with Grammy winning musician Joe Lovano and vocalist Judi Silvano. The concert is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-123    04/26/2004   Curtis
Op-Ed: Immigration and labor force participation: Have times changed?
Nationwide, manufacturing jobs, once the mainstay of the middle income, have been shrinking. In 1969 more than 34 percent of working Rhode Islanders were employed in manufacturing. Today that number is 12 percent; low-income service jobs have increasingly replaced manufacturing jobs. If today's immigrants are to become the grandparents of tomorrow's professionals, education and language skills will be a major key, writes Jean Burritt Robertson. Robertson presented her ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-115    04/23/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: Let us leave no immigrant child behind!
Given that educating English language learners requires an investment in special programming -- in a time when resources are shrinking -- programs and services specifically designed for students who are learning English may suffer the deepest cuts. While investments in educating English language learners have a current cost, that cost is small when compared to the future cost of failing to do so, writes Virginia M.C. da Mota. Da Mota presented her ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-116    04/23/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: Safety through immigration control
No matter the weapon or delivery system -- hijacked airliners, shipping containers, suitcase nukes, anthrax spores -- terrorists are needed to carry out the attacks, and those terrorists have to enter and operate in the United States. In a very real sense, the primary weapons of our enemies are not the inanimate objects at all, but rather the terrorists themselves. Thus keeping the terrorists out or apprehending them after they get in is indispensable to victory, writes Mark Krikorian. Krikorian presented his ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-117    04/23/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: In defense of Tom ‘Thumb' Ridge
History says that everyone coming here is a foreigner until proven otherwise. The U.S. immigration authorities have a long, flourishing tradition, beginning in the early 19th century, of treating every would-be immigrant like a criminal. Immigration personnel at Ellis Island changed names that sounded too "foreign" to sound more Amurrican, writes Andrei Codrescu. Codrescu presented his ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-118    04/23/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: America must not close the door to refugees
Immigrants and refugees and their advocates are as shaken by terrorism as the rest of us and want to ensure that terrorists are not given a free pass to enter America. We must enforce and strengthen existing laws and institute new procedures aimed at terrorists and criminals. But we must not let refugees become collateral damage in the process, writes Lavinia Limon. Limon presented her ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-119    04/23/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: Immigrant stories
America still offers immigrant writers a shelter -- a place and a space to write -- and even the occasional rewards of the literary marketplace. For an immigrant writer, the welcoming anonymity of American life is both liberating and stifling, exhilarating and disheartening. America still promises, and gives, much of herself to immigrant writers. But once translated and published, immigrant stories start American lives of their own, write David Shrayer-Petrov and Maxim D. Shrayer. Shrayer-Petrov and Shrayer presented their ideas at the 2004 Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration."
News Release   03-120    04/23/2004   Howell
Hepatitis B vaccination for inmates would protect health of communities
Ninety-three percent of Rhode Island inmates studied said they would agree to receive the hepatitis B vaccine in prison if it were offered, according to new Brown University research. Although vaccination has been available for two decades, 1.2 million Americans have chronic hepatitis B, and the disease continues to spread. Few prison systems offer the vaccine to inmates.
News Release   03-122    04/23/2004   Cole
Howard Foundation announces 12 fellowships for 2004-05 academic year
The George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation has announced 12 creative-writing fellowships of $20,000 each for the 2004-05 academic year. Brown University, which administers the Howard Foundation for the foundation's Board of Administration, also announced that the 2005-06 fellowships will be given in the area of literary criticism.
News Release   03-113    04/21/2004   Nickel
Here there be data: Mapping the landscape of science
In ancient maps of the world, expanses of unknown territory might hold a warning to would-be explorers: Here there be monsters. For today's explorers seeking to navigate and understand the world of science, the monsters are the untamed collections of data that inhabit a largely uncharted landscape, according to the National Science Foundation
GSJ Story   28GSJ15b    04/16/2004   Freelance
Investments set stage for growth in biological sciences, Med School
At a press briefing held on campus April 5, the University expanded upon the Plan for Academic Enrichment's proposals to enhance the Medical School.
GSJ Story   28GSJ15c    04/16/2004   Nickel
Seed Fund Awards go to six multidisciplinary research projects
Six multidisciplinary research proposals will receive financial support totaling nearly $442,000 for projects that will explore the areas of cognitive computer applications, vaccine development, environmental issues along the Israeli-Palestinian watershed, the potential toxicity of nanomaterials, adolescent pregnancy, and neuroproteomics.
GSJ Story   28GSJ15d    04/16/2004   Sweeney
Brown to host AIDS exhibition, documentary and three-day symposium
Now through June 2004, Brown will host a multifaceted project titled "Pandemic: Facing AIDS." Brown is the first U.S. university to host the international exhibition, "Pandemic: Imaging AIDS," which will be on display at Brown's Watson Institute through June 12. The University will also present "Provoking Hope: A Brown University HIV/AIDS Symposium" April 23-25, 2004, in Starr Auditorium in MacMillan Hall. All events in this project are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-109    04/14/2004   Curtis
Ted Turner to be honored for lifetime achievement in entrepreneurship
Philanthropist and cable news pioneer Ted Turner will be honored May 1, 2004, at 5 p.m. at the conclusion of a two-day Entrepreneurial Extravaganza that invites aspiring entrepreneurs from East Coast colleges and universities to compete for cash. The event is a joint collaboration by Brown University and Bryant College.
News Release   03-112    04/13/2004   Cole
Unmarried women say they feel misunderstood in doctors' offices
Inhibitions about doctor visits was a main reason unmarried women said they did not seek routine cancer screening tests, according to initial findings from a five-year study of women ages 40 to 75. Change is needed to ensure the 20 million women in this population undergo tests that detect cancer in its early stages. Researchers are recruiting 600 women for the next phase of the project.
News Release   03-110    04/12/2004   Cole
Sportscaster Chris Berman to give Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture
ESPN anchor and sportscaster Chris Berman, a member of the Brown class of 1977, will give the fourth annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture Thursday, April 15, 2004, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. Berman will speak on "Sports: America's Last Melting Pot." Following the lecture, Berman will conduct an ESPN-style interview with special guest Bill Belichick, head coach of the World Champion New England Patriots. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-111    04/12/2004   Curtis
Adrien Brody, Wes Craven to speak at third annual Ivy Film Festival
Brown University will host the third annual Ivy Film Festival April 8-11, 2004. The festival will feature student film entries from the United States and abroad, as well as lectures and panel discussions with Academy Award-winning actor Adrien Brody, directors Wes Craven and Brett Ratner, and others. The festival is open to the public; tickets are required for all events.
News Release   03-104    04/08/2004   Curtis
Mexican presidential candidate Jorge Castaneda to give Ogden Lecture
Jorge Castaneda, former Mexican secretary of foreign affairs and now a candidate for Mexico's 2006 presidential election, will give a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lecture on International Affairs titled "Mexico: Democracy in Progress." Castaneda will speak on Tuesday, April 13, 2004, at 6:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-107    04/08/2004   Curtis
Op-Ed: Should presidents lie?
In many cases where strong national interests are at stake, a deliberate deception may be called for. But the decision to go to war is among the most fundamental questions the state faces, writes Corey Brettschneider. For this reason, Article I of the Constitution grants the power to declare war to Congress, our deliberative body, and an agent of the people's consent. Can people give their informed consent if they have been deceived?
News Release   03-108    04/08/2004   Nickel
Meissner to open 24th Brown/Providence Journal conference April 25
U.S. immigration policy expert Doris Meissner will deliver the Michael P. Metcalf-Howard R. Swearer Memorial Lecture to open the 24th annual Brown University/-Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference. The conference, "Homeland Insecurity: The Changing Face of Immigration," runs April 25 through April 28, 2004. Meissner will give her address, titled "Immigration and Security: A Post-9/11 Report Card," on Sunday, April 25, at 5 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green.
News Release   03-105    04/07/2004   Howell
Brown announces investments in biological sciences, new hospital agreements
As part of the Plan for Academic Enrichment, the Corporation of Brown University has approved proposals that will bring significant new investments to the Division of Biology and Medicine. New laboratories and an expanded faculty are already under way in the basic biological sciences. The University is committed to expanding its Program in Public Health and providing it a new home. The Medical School and its hospital partners will be working under new agreements.
News Release   03-106    04/05/2004   Nickel
Brown's Department of Public Safety to begin reaccreditation process
As part of the national reaccreditation process for Brown University's Department of Public Safety to be conducted this summer, the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies will conduct a special public meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, April 26, in MacMillan Hall, Room 117. Community members may also submit written comments. DPS received its initial accreditation in July 1998, and was reaccredited in July 2001.
News Release   03-121    04/03/2004   Nickel
Public Art Committee will bring Paola Pivi mural to Brown
Brown's Public Art Committee is bringing a 33-by-40-foot photographic mural by Italian artist Paola Pivi to campus. The untitled work, on loan to Brown, will be installed on the western exterior of Brown's Sciences Library on Thayer Street.
News Release   03-102    04/01/2004   Curtis
What might have been: Bell Gallery to exhibit "Unbuilt Providence"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition, titled "Unbuilt Providence: Architectural Visions, 1856 to 2000," April 14 through May 31, 2004. A reception and a lecture by guest curator Dietrich Neumann are set for Friday, April 23, at 5:30 p.m. in the List Art Center, 64 College St. Both events are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-101    03/31/2004   Curtis
Brown to host Cochrane Collaboration Meeting on health care April 1-2
Brown University will host the United States Cochrane Collaboration Meeting, titled "Building the Foundation: Creating Greater Awareness and Use of Evidence-based Health Care," April 1 and 2, 2004, in MacMillan Hall, 167 Thayer St.
News Release   03-100    03/30/2004   Curtis
David C. Lewis: Stop perpetuating the "crack baby" myth
After 16 years of research and more than a decade of following the development of children thought to have been at serious risk, medical experts have not identified a recognizable condition, syndrome or disorder that should merit the label "crack baby." With no basis in science, the term serves only to stigmatize and slander children and their mothers and should be eliminated from public discourse.
News Release   03-099    03/29/2004   Nickel
Committee on smoke shop raid must comply with Open Meeting Act
The Independent Review Committee, appointed by G. Carcieri to study the State Police raid on a tax-free smoke shop operated by the Narragansett tribe, is subject to Rhode Island's Open Meeting Act, according to an opinion released today by the Rhode Island attorney general.
News Release   03-098    03/26/2004   Nickel
At Brown
Sheridan Center teaching awards; On the Road; research note on Milankovitch Theory
GSJ Story   28GSJ13b    03/26/2004   Sweeney
LaVigne ready to wrangle volunteers for Rebuilding Together
Brown volunteers will hoist paintbrushes, hammers and shovels to refurbish the Fox Point Boys and Girls Club on April 24
GSJ Story   28GSJ13c    03/26/2004   Cole
New LGBTQ Resource Center offers information, meeting space
The new Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgendered and Questioning Resource Center in Faunce House "is a demonstration that diversity is respected and celebrated," said Angela Mazaris, who serves as LGBTQ Resource Center part-time coordinator.
GSJ Story   28GSJ13d    03/26/2004   Cole
Laser-wielding students explore ways to jump-start nerve growth
Six undergraduate students participating in a Group Research Project (GRP) under the direction of Assistant Professor of Medical Science and Engineering Diane Hoffman-Kim are using sophisticated laser techniques to determine what makes nerves grow. The research eventually may help scientists develop treatments for people with spinal cord injuries, as well as developmental neurological disorders.
GSJ Story   28GSJ13e    03/26/2004   Freelance
Brown faculty, staff, students to refurbish Fox Point Club April 24
As Rebuilding Together, formerly called Christmas in April, marks its 10th anniversary rehabilitating homes and community buildings throughout the state, volunteers from Brown University will pitch in to refurbish one of the largest Boys and Girls Clubs in the city. The project is sponsored by Brown.
News Release   03-097    03/25/2004   Cole
Presidential election campaign platforms impact the stock market
Each fluctuation in public opinion about candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore during the 2000 presidential election led to corresponding changes in equity prices of firms aligned with the two candidates, according to a new study by a Brown University economist Brian G. Knight. Bushs ultimate victory in the election resulted in a $100-billion shift in value from Gore-favored to Bush-favored firms.
News Release   03-093    03/22/2004   Cole
Education faculty member receives Wriston Fellowship for 2004-05
Wilbur Johnson, lecturer and clinical professor of social studies and history in the Department of Education, recently received the Wriston Fellowship, one of the highest awards the University bestows upon its teaching faculty. Johnson will use the fellowship to create a new undergraduate seminar course that examines issues surrounding the concept of "white privilege."
News Release   03-094    03/22/2004   Cole
Brown and RISD to present joint exhibit of Buonanno Rome collection
Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design will jointly present "The Theater That Was Rome: 16th-18th Century Views and Maps," a simultaneous exhibition of objects from the collection of Vincent J. Buonanno, April 9 through July 11, 2004, at the RISD Museum of Art and Brown's John Hay Library. In conjunction with the exhibit, Brown will host a symposium, titled "Rome in Print," on Saturday, April 24, 2004, at the List Art Center.
News Release   03-095    03/22/2004   Curtis
Newsweek columnist Howard Fineman to give Licht Lecture
Newsweek magazine chief political correspondent Howard Fineman will give the inaugural Governor Frank Licht Lecture on Tuesday, March 23, 2004, at 7:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall on The College Green. Fineman will fill in for the previously-announced Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David S. Broder, who has canceled due to illness.
News Release   03-096    03/22/2004   Curtis
David Winton Bell Gallery to host 24th annual "Student Exhibition"
The David Winton Bell Gallery and the Department of Visual Art will present the 24th annual "Student Exhibition" March 20 through April 4, 2004. An opening reception for the artists is scheduled for Saturday, March 27, 2004, from 6 to 9 p.m. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-089    03/18/2004   Curtis
President Simmons to welcome Donald C. Eversley back to Providence
Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will host a reception to welcome Brown alumnus Donald C. Eversley back to Providence as president of the Providence Economic Development Partnership. Gov. Donald L. Carcieri and Mayor David N. Cicilline will also attend. The reception, by invitation only, begins at 5:30 p.m. in the John Carter Brown Library.
News Release   03-092    03/16/2004   Nickel
Pulitzer-winning journalist David S. Broder to give first Licht Lecture
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David S. Broder will give the inaugural Gov. Frank Licht Lecture when he speaks on "American Politics: 2004 and Beyond" on Tuesday, March 23, 2004, at 7:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall on The College Green. The lecture, sponsored by the Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions, is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-091    03/12/2004   Curtis
15,268 seek admission to the Class of 2008
Women make up 58 percent of those vying to walk through the Van Wickle Gates in the fall as members of the Class of 2008 - 8,854 applications compared to 6,414 applications from men. Letters to applicants accepted from the total applicant pool of 15,268 will be mailed April 1.
GSJ Story   28GSJ12c    03/12/2004   Cole
A look at Faculty Scholars for 2003-04
Each year, faculty are asked to nominate students for the Faculty Scholars Program, which was created by faculty in 1982 to provide scholarship and fellowship aid to undergraduate or graduate students, particularly those who have demonstrated academic excellence. Seven Brown students have been named Faculty Scholars for 2003-04. Here is a brief look at each.
GSJ Story   28GSJ12d    03/12/2004   Cole
Joukowsky's work on exhibit at American Museum of Natural History
Seldom is there a major exhibit of an archaeologist's work in his or her lifetime, but Brown's Professor Martha Sharp Joukowsky is now among the few who have been so honored. Since 1993, Joukowsky has led a team of Brown archaeologists and students in excavating the Great Temple of Petra. Now their work is on display in "Petra: Lost City of Stone," a special traveling exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City through July 6.
GSJ Story   28GSJ12e    03/12/2004   Curtis
Archaeologists' work on exhibit at American Museum of Natural History
The work of a team of Brown archaeologists led by Martha Sharp Joukowsky, director of the Center for Old World Archaeology and Art, is being displayed in "Petra: Lost City of Stone," a traveling exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City through July 6, 2004. On Sunday, March 14, 2004, at the museum, Joukowsky will present a slide-illustrated lecture on her work at the Great Temple of Petra.
News Release   03-087    03/05/2004   Curtis
John Carter Brown Library hosts exhibit on college foundings
The John Carter Brown Library is hosting a new exhibition, "The Establishment Of Colleges In The English Colonies," through May 1, 2004. The collection features documents relating to the founding of Harvard University, the College of William and Mary, Yale University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University, Brown University and Dartmouth College.
News Release   03-090    03/05/2004   Curtis
Chinese democracy activist Wang Youcai to arrive in Providence tonight
Chinese democracy activist Wang Youcai, one of the leaders of the 1989 student demonstrations in Tiananmen Square will arrive in Providence, R.I., tonight (Thursday, March 4, 2004). Wang, who was first imprisoned in 1998, was given medical parole earlier today. Wang's stay in the United States will be sponsored by Chinese dissident Xu Wenli, visiting senior fellow at Brown University's Watson Institute.
News Release   03-086    03/04/2004   Howell
Royce Professorships will recognize teaching excellence of Brown faculty
A $5.5-million gift from Brown alumnus and trustee emeritus Charles M. Royce, will fund six professorships to honor Brown faculty for excellence in teaching. Royce's gift was one of seven major gifts presented to and accepted by the Brown Corporation at its regular winter meeting Saturday, Feb. 28, 2004.
News Release   03-085    03/02/2004   Nickel
Corporation approves historic 15-year Plan for Academic Enrichment
The Plan for Academic Enrichment, approved by the Brown Corporation at its regular meeting Saturday, Feb. 28, 2004, outlines more than a decade of investments in Brown's faculty, academic programs, core academic facilities, environment for student living, and the physical campus -- a program that could transform the University.
News Release   03-082    02/28/2004   Nickel
Corporation sets tuition and fees, approves budget for 2004-05
Overall charges for undergraduates at Brown University will rise to $39,808 for the 2004-05 academic year, an increase of 4.9 percent. That figure includes tuition of $30,672, an increase of 5 percent.
News Release   03-084    02/28/2004   Nickel
First students join Brown/MBL graduate program
In the past year, both April Shiflett and Justin Widener have followed Steven Hajduk, their doctoral advisor from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, to the MBL in Woods Hole, where Hajduk is now director of the center's Global Infectious Diseases program. When Brown created an institutional affiliation with the MBL last July to foster cutting-edge research in biology, biomedicine and environmental sciences, the students saw a golden opportunity – and this semester they officially transferred to the Brown-MBL graduate program in pathobiology
GSJ Story   28GSJ11a    02/27/2004   Curtis
MBL scientist brings his interest in genomics to Brown
Giardia lamblia is a protozoa that can cause severe cases of diarrhea known as giardiasis. To Mitchell L. Sogin, director of the Bay Paul Center at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Giardia is also a link to the past, providing insights into the evolution of life on earth. His lab works to sequence the entire Giardia lamblia genome. This data will be made available for medical use, as well as for the evolutionary research that fascinates Sogin. Thanks to the MBL partnership with Brown, he also looks forward to assisting with joint courses about genomics – the study of an organism's entire DNA sequence – and molecular evolution.
GSJ Story   28GSJ11b    02/27/2004   Freelance
New online employment system goes live Feb. 29
Brown University's Human Resources Department is introducing a new online employment system designed to make the employment process more efficient and accessible for job seekers and hiring managers.
GSJ Story   28GSJ11f    02/27/2004   Freelance
Burton and Pereira headline Boyer's ‘Ellis Island' concert at VMA
Immigration is an experience shared by nearly all American families at some point in their history, and for many, Ellis Island plays a central role in that experience. On March 6 the Brown University Orchestra will celebrate the immigrant journey when it moves from College Hill to downtown Providence to perform Peter Boyer's multimedia composition "Ellis Island: The Dream of America" at Veterans Memorial Auditorium Arts and Cultural Center.
GSJ Story   28GSJ11h    02/27/2004   Curtis
Brown University to open LGBTQ Resource Center March 2
A grand opening celebration for the LGBTQ Resource Center will be held Tuesday, March 2, 2004, from 5 to 7 p.m., in Rooms 321 and 323 of Faunce House on The College Green. The center will serve as a meeting place for a variety of student groups and as a hub for academic activity and administrative programs.
News Release   03-080    02/25/2004   Cole
Brown Chorus to perform Bach's Passion According to St. John March 5
The Brown University Chorus will perform Bach's "Passion According to St. John" on Friday, March 5, 2004, at 8 p.m. at Central Congregational Church, 296 Angell St. Proceeds from the performance will support the choir's concert tour of Russia and Finland in June.
News Release   03-077    02/20/2004   Curtis
Brown Orchestra, Kate Burton to perform Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island"
The Brown University Orchestra, conducted by Paul Phillips, will perform "Ellis Island: The Dream of America," composer Peter Boyer's multimedia concert celebration of immigration, on Saturday, March 6, 2004, at the VMA Arts and Cultural Center. Noted actress Kate Burton, a member of the Brown Class of 1979, and violinist Juliana Pereira '04, a three-time Concerto Competition winner, will be among the featured performers.
News Release   03-075    02/16/2004   Curtis
Brown University and Black Coaches Association to honor Fritz Pollard
Brown University and the Black Coaches Association will co-sponsor an annual Fritz Pollard Award, to be presented to the college or professional coach chosen by the BCA as coach of the year. The award honors Frederick Douglass ďFritzĒ Pollard of Brownís Class of 1919, the first African American to play in a Rose Bowl Game (for Brown, in 1916), first to quarterback an NFL team, and first to coach in the NFL. (See also background on Fritz Pollard.)
News Release   03-078    02/16/2004   Nickel
Privacy protections for children often fail in sexual abuse cases
Violations of privacy protections often occur in the most intensely publicized child abuse cases, says Ross E. Cheit, associate professor of political science and public policy. As a result, children can be further victimized by false reports about their testimony. Cheit presented his findings Sunday, Feb. 15, 2004, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting.
News Release   03-076    02/15/2004   Cole
Bonus program honors 225 staff members
The bonus program announced by President Simmons last fall culminated during the last week of January with 225 staff members – 187 individuals and 13 teams totaling 38 members – receiving bonus checks.
GSJ Story   28GSJ10b    02/13/2004   Freelance
17 faculty members receive Salomon research awards
The Office of the Vice President for Research has announced this year's recipients of Richard B. Salomon Faculty Research Awards. This program was established to support excellence in scholarly work by providing funding for faculty research projects deemed to be of exceptional merit.
GSJ Story   28GSJ10f    02/13/2004   Freelance
Spolaore explores economics of a nation's size
For the most part, economists have left unexplored how political borders are formed and redrawn, assuming that national borders are fixed much like geographical features such as mountains or coasts, said Enrico Spolaore, Kutayba Alghanim Assistant Professor of Political Economy. However, when borders are viewed as human-made institutions, as Spoloare and Alberto Alesina of Harvard do in a new book "The Size of Nations," the importance of studying the economics of country size becomes apparent: Nations are some of the world's most powerful organizations.
GSJ Story   28GSJ10g    02/13/2004   Cole
Team's findings enhance understanding of rock friction
A group of researchers led by Professor of Geological Sciences Terry Tullis has discovered a gel-like substance – forming when samples of quartz rock rub against each other – that may help explain the weakening of friction that occurs between geologic faults during certain earthquakes.
GSJ Story   28GSJ10h    02/13/2004   Unassigned
Why don't women run for office? Less confidence and encouragement
Women have as much success being elected as men but they are not as likely to consider running for office. A groundbreaking study to be published in the American Journal of Political Science found two major factors at work: Women are not as likely as men to view themselves as qualified to hold office, and women are not as likely to receive encouragement from party leaders to become candidates.
News Release   03-074    02/12/2004   Cole
A conversation between a physician and an anthropologist sheds light on aging
Stanley M. Aronson, professor emeritus of medical science, and co-author Renee Rose Shield, clinical associate professor of community health, set out to examine the complex issues facing the older person in today's society in their new book, "Aging in Today's World." Aronson, a physician, tackled the subject from a medical perspective. Shield, an anthropologist, provides the view of a careful observer.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09a    01/30/2004   Ferguson
Seeking factors that prevent some from getting health care
A community-driven group research project investigates "functional disenfranchisement," which the student participants and faculty leader suspect prevents residents in underserved communities from getting the health care they need.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09c    01/30/2004   Ferguson
At Brown
Office moves; new Corporation member; obituaries; awards and honors; more
GSJ Story   28GSJ09d    01/30/2004   Sweeney
Inquiring Minds: James Head on the exploration of Mars
For several decades, Professor of Geological Sciences James Head has played a significant role in both U.S. and international space missions. Head is involved in the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Express mission, both orbiting the planet, and worked in astronaut training, site selection and mission operations during the Apollo Lunar Exploration Program, among other efforts. He spoke recently about the current Mars missions and President Bush's recently announced new vision for NASA.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09e    01/30/2004   Howell
Festival offers 'Modern Exposure' for graduate playwrights
Three first-year MFA candidates will offer workshop productions of their new plays during part one of the festival Feb. 4-8 in the McCormack Family Theatre. Part two, scheduled for April 28 through May 2, will showcase the thesis projects of three second-year MFA playwriting students.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09g    01/30/2004   Curtis
Largest multistate study finds end-of-life care still ‘woefully inadequate'
In a national study on end-of-life care, Brown researchers found that the physical and emotional needs of the dying continue to be unmet, particularly for those who die in institutions. According to the study, Americans who die in nursing homes and hospitals often receive inadequate pain control, too little emotional support, a lack of respect from staff, and poor communication with physicians.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09i    01/30/2004   Ferguson
New online calendar of events debuts on Brown Web site
The University has a new online calendar of events located at http://calendar.brown.edu. The new service, updated regularly and searchable by date, event category or keyword, makes information about lectures, concerts, athletic contests, club meetings, exhibitions and other events available throughout campus and to the extended Brown community of alumni, parents, campus neighbors and friends.
GSJ Story   28GSJ09k    01/30/2004   Sweeney
Diploma or not, high school students who learn more will earn more
Even in an economy that has moved from an industrial to a technologically advanced base, basic skills matter. High school dropouts who scored higher on a standardized test earned more when they entered the labor market than high school dropouts with lower scores, according to a new Brown University study.
News Release   03-072    01/21/2004   Cole
New online calendar of events debuts on Brown Web site
The University's new online calendar of events calendar.brown.edu offers a variety of user-friendly features and enables members of the Brown community to post events directly into the calendar database.
News Release   03-072    01/21/2004   Sweeney
New online calendar of events debuts on Brown Web site
The University's new online calendar of events -- at calendar.brown.edu -- offers a variety of user-friendly features and enables members of the Brown community to post events directly into the calendar database.
News Release   03-073    01/21/2004   Sweeney
Bell Gallery to exhibit artist Bill Seaman's "Exchange Fields"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a multisensory interactive exhibition, "Bill Seaman: Exhange Fields," featuring the work of award-winning video artist and RISD Professor Bill Seaman, Jan. 24 through March 10, 2004. The exhibit is free and open to the public, as is the opening reception and artist's lecture on Friday, Jan. 23, at 5:30 p.m.
News Release   03-068    01/12/2004   Curtis
Largest multistate study finds end-of-life care still "woefully inadequate"
In a national study on end-of-life care in the United States, Brown University researchers find the physical and emotional needs of the dying continue to be unmet, particularly for those who die in institutions. With baby boomers about to reach retirement age, the need for reform becomes increasingly urgent, according to Joan Teno, lead author of a paper to be published Jan. 7, 2004 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   03-066    01/06/2004   Ferguson
Brown planetary geologists play major role in space exploration
During the last several decades, geological scientists from Brown University have played significant roles in space science, participating in the design and implementation of voyages to Mars, the Earth's moon, Venus, Jupiter and its moons, and asteroids.
News Release   03-067    01/06/2004   Howell
Op-Ed: Saddam's capture may either heal or hurt
Providing Saddam with an open speaker's platform in court will undoubtedly be uncomfortable, but it is the right way to proceed. The world will then see the real Hussein, rather than the symbolic villain the United States has been fighting for the last two years.
News Release   03-063    12/15/2003   Nickel
Study finds that fungus farming by snails causes marsh grasses to wither
A new study led by a Brown University biologist reveals that a species of marine snail uses a unique method of agriculture. According to the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the snail cultivates the growth of fungus, its preferred food, on live marsh grass, leading to a fungal infestation that suppresses marsh grass production. Fungal farming was previously thought to occur only in terrestrial insects.
News Release   03-060    12/01/2003   Howell
Galor leads Wadi Arabah gathering
Katharina Galor, visiting assistant professor at the Center for Old World Archaeology and Art, has organized a symposium that will bring together some 40 scholars from Israel, Jordan, Europe and North America to discuss their research on the Wadi Arabah.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08a    11/21/2003   Curtis
At Brown
Obituary, food drives, more
GSJ Story   28GSJ08b    11/21/2003   Sweeney
Steve Hajduk's mentoring messengers
Stephen Hajduk, a researcher at the Marine Biological Laboratory, has found a kindred spirit in the chromosomes of African Trypanosomes, single-celled parasites which use a mentoring process to fix typo-like errors in messenger molecules. Hajduk, who will be a guest lecturer in two Brown courses next semester, directs the Molecular Pathogenesis and Molecular Infectious Disease Program and is an active mentor to his students, firmly engaged in their development as researchers.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08f    11/21/2003   Whitney
Love, marriage and HIV
Daniel J. Smith, assistant professor of anthropology and a faculty member in the Population Studies and Training Center, is on the team of researchers from various universities who won a $1.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health for the three-year collaboration.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08g    11/21/2003   Cole
Smoking heavily during pregnancy
The offspring of mothers who smoke heavily during their pregnancy are far more likely to develop nicotine dependence once they themselves try cigarettes.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08h    11/21/2003   Ferguson
Nurmikko at helm of project to develop advanced materials for energy program
A group of research scientists from Brown and Yale, led by Arto Nurmikko, professor of engineering and physics, recently received $900,000 from the Department of Energy to develop advanced materials for energy-efficient lighting applications.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08i    11/21/2003   Howell
Student's internship in Tanzania
Allison Whitney's internship in Tanzania united her interest in development issues and biology with her interest in science writing.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08k    11/21/2003   Ferguson
On the horizon for research at Brown
Vice President for Research Andries van Dam talks about the direction of Brown's research efforts.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08l    11/21/2003   Nickel
Van Dam's staff makes sure research effort is supported
In the year since being named to lead the University's new Office of the Vice President of Research, Andries van Dam has hired a team of individuals to help him advocate for the University's research community on and off campus.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08m    11/21/2003   Sweeney
Freund wins 'honor of lifetime'
Engineering Professor L. Ben Freund has received one of applied mechanics' highest honors - the Stephen P. Timoshenko Medal.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08n    11/21/2003   Howell
De Groot makes Esquire's "Genius Edition"
Of the 38 men and women listed in Esquire magazine's "Genius Issue," two have ties to Brown: Assistant Professor Anne De Groot is recognized for her pioneering efforts to develop a vaccine for AIDS; Bobby Jindal '92, who narrowly missed becoming Louisiana's governor earlier this month, was presented as "the new face of southern politics."
GSJ Story   28GSJ08o    11/21/2003   Ferguson
Op-Ed: What is killing our kids?
It is no longer disease that poses the biggest threat to young lives, but behavioral misadventures of poorly understood origins, writes Lewis P. Lipsitt. We need an effort on the scale of a Manhattan Project to create a solution that would end the behavior that is killing our children. That we are so limited in our knowledge at this stage in human history about the origins and nature of human behavior is unacceptable.
News Release   03-056    11/18/2003   Nickel
"What's Killing Our Kids?" Experts discuss behavior that ends young lives
Experts will explore the behaviors killing this country's youth -- including suicide, substance abuse, self-mutilation and bullying -- Nov. 21 and 22, 2003, in Starr Auditorium of MacMillan Hall at Brown University. The national symposium titled "What's Killing Our Kids?" is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-055    11/14/2003   Cole
Herpes research uncovers possible clue to Alzheimer's disease
Investigating the transport mechanisms of the herpes simplex virus, researchers at Brown University and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., discovered, for the first time, a physical connection between the herpes virus and amyloid precursor protein (APP). A byproduct of APP -- beta-amyloid -- is a major component of the amyloid plaques that are found consistently in the brains of persons with Alzheimer's disease.
News Release   03-050    11/07/2003   Ferguson
Brown and RISD team up to offer Performance Art Series
Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design have teamed up to offer the first annual RISD-Brown Performance Art Series through April 2004. The collaborative presentations -- all free and open to the public -- will include separate performances by playwright/actor Eric Bogosian and performance artist Julia Mandle on Nov. 13, 2003.
News Release   03-052    11/07/2003   Curtis
Brown, RISD partner to offer art performance series
Audiences will be hiking College Hill on Nov. 13 when playwright/actor Eric Bogosian and performance artist Julia Mandle appear in separate venues as part of the first RISD-Brown Performance Art Series.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07d    11/07/2003   Curtis
R.I. agency honors environmental studies class
Students in ES126, "Public Perception of the Environment," have received the Rhode Island American Planning Association Journalism Award for their 2002 research project that examined the experiences and perspectives of a northern Rhode Island community in relation to a local water crisis.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07e    11/07/2003   Howell
Ready, set, scream!
Brown student athletes have been known to strike fear in the hearts of their formidable opponents on occasion, but this Halloween they turned those fear-provoking tactics elsewhere. The Brown students volunteered their time and talents to decorate, disguise, spook and haunt their way into the hearts of hundreds of young goblins and ghouls at the Fox Point Boys/Girls Club in Providence during the club's annual "Halloween Fun Night."
GSJ Story   28GSJ07f    11/07/2003   Montgomery
Economist Aizer explores after-school childcare issues for older children
Her findings suggest childcare programs should be expanded beyond the historic focus of programs for preschool-age children to include older children who stand to gain considerably from greater adult supervision in the hours after school.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07g    11/07/2003   Cole
New phase transition diagram confirms nobelist's theory, reveals new superconductor behavior
A team of scientists from Brown University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a new understanding of the phase transition in type-II superconductors. The development, reported in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, confirms the work of a Nobel Prize-winning physics theorist and reveals behavior long thought to exist in these materials.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07h    11/07/2003   Howell
Parsipur, Soyinka headline "Freedom to Write"
"Freedom to Write" is a two-day series of readings and panel discussions celebrating Brown's International Writers Project.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07j    11/07/2003   Curtis
Turcotte aids Isabel's victims as Red Cross volunteer
As part of Red Cross disaster teams since 1985, Suzanne Turcotte has provided aid to victims of Hurricanes Hugo, Andrew and Bob, as well as those of countless other national and local catastrophes. On her most recent assignment just this semester, she spent two weeks in Virginia with four other local Red Cross volunteers assisting the victims of Hurricane Isabel.
GSJ Story   28GSJ07k    11/07/2003   Curtis
GRP seeks answers to obesity in Samoa
Group Research Projects (GRPs) are small teams of undergraduate students who work with a faculty member - in this case, community health Professor McGarvey, on a project that contributes to the faculty member's research.
GSJ Story   28GSJ08j    11/07/2003   Ferguson
Brown computer science course seeks city teachers' ideas for software
"The Educational Software Seminar," a unique undergraduate course taught at Brown University for the last decade, produces software for use in elementary, secondary and post-secondary classrooms. Providence teachers are invited to submit proposals for software that would be developed by undergraduates during spring semester 2004 for use in the teachers' classrooms.
News Release   03-051    11/04/2003   Sweeney
Simmons, administrators address staff forum
The University closed fiscal year 2003 with a 1 percent overall surplus, the endowment returned 6.5 percent, and significant progress has been made on the Initiatives for Academic Enrichment. Those were some of the facts shared by President Simmons, Provost Robert Zimmer and Executive Vice President for Finance and Administration Beppie Huidekoper at a forum sponsored Oct. 21 by the President's Staff Advisory Committee.
GSJ Story   28GSJ06c    10/31/2003   Sweeney
Gallery features Korean installation artist
Three installations by the critically acclaimed contemporary artist Do-Ho Suh will be shown Nov. 8 through Dec. 21 at the Bell Gallery.
GSJ Story   28GSJ06d    10/31/2003   Curtis
New phase transition map confirms Nobel laureate's 50-year-old theory
A team of researchers from Brown University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a new phase diagram for type-II superconductors. The research, reported in a recent issue of "Physical Review Letters," confirms the seminal theory of type-II superconductors predicted by one of the winners of this year's Nobel Prize in physics, and unravels behavior long suspected to exist in these materials.
News Release   03-048    10/30/2003   Howell
International Writers Project hosts "Freedom to Write" Nov. 7-8
Brown will celebrate its new International Writers Project with a two-day event titled "Freedom to Write," on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 7 and 8, 2003, in Starr Auditorium in MacMillan Hall. This series of readings and panel discussions will feature Iranian novelist Shahrnush Parsipur, the University's first International Writing Fellow, along with Nigerian Nobel Prize Laureate Wole Soyinka, poet Kamau Brathwaite and others. The events are open to the public without charge.
News Release   03-047    10/28/2003   Curtis
John Carter Brown Library hosts exhibition of new acquisitions
The John Carter Brown Library is presenting "In JCB: Acquisition Highlights of the 21st Century," an exhibition featuring some of the most recent additions to the library's unique collection, through Jan. 31, 2004. The exhibit is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-046    10/27/2003   Curtis
Watson Institute's trademark elm has Dutch elm disease, will be removed
The American elm tree outside the Thayer Street entrance to the Watson Institute has been found to have Dutch elm disease. It will be removed in November.
News Release   03-045    10/23/2003   Nickel
Research Notes
Climate variations, sleep, grants
GSJ Story   28GSJ05c    10/17/2003   Howell
Tibetan temples' artwork preserved in Lieberman photos
To accomplish their goal of photographing Tibetan Buddhist wall paintings, faculty members and avid hikers Philip and Marcia Lieberman received a grant of $65,000 from the Getty Foundation to capture on film the wall paintings in three monastery temples of Mustang, an ethnically and culturally Tibetan district in northwestern Nepal.
GSJ Story   28GSJ05e    10/17/2003   Cole
Brown and Tulsa to work jointly on Modernist Journals Project
Faculty at Brown University and the University of Tulsa will join forces to work on the Modernist Journals Project. That project, which originated at Brown, seeks to produce digital editions of important modernist journals and to make its work available to scholars on the Web. Faculty at both institutions already have similar but complementary scholarly projects underway.
News Release   03-044    10/15/2003   Nickel
Bell Gallery to present work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a new exhibition of works by contemporary Korean artist Do-Ho Suh from Nov. 8 through Dec. 21, 2003, in conjunction with Brown's Korean centennial celebration. An opening reception and lecture by the artist are scheduled for Friday, Nov. 7, at 5:30 p.m. in the List Art Center Auditorium.
News Release   03-042    10/14/2003   Curtis
Career Week to cover looking for work in a tough economy and more
Career Week, a four-day series of programs for undergraduates about exploring employment options, will include discussion of such timely topics as searching for a job in a tough economy and while facing record-high cost of living.
News Release   03-043    10/14/2003   Cole
Corporation adopts Strategic Framework for Physical Planning
The Corporation of Brown University has accepted a sweeping report and adopted its set of principles to guide the University's growth for the next half century. The "Strategic Framework for Physical Planning" offers three key recommendations: Develop a circulation infrastructure to unify and enhance the campus; consolidate the core; and move beyond College Hill.
News Release   03-039    10/11/2003   Sweeney
Brown Corporation introduced to leadership for next capital campaign
As part of a strategic discussion of the University's future, members of the Brown Corporation were introduced to three co-chairs and two honorary co-chairs of the University's next comprehensive campaign. That campaign will provide crucial support for the long-range Initiatives for Academic Enrichment.
News Release   03-040    10/11/2003   Nickel
Brown to design and build, buy and retrofit two new research facilities
At its Saturday, Oct. 11, meeting, the Corporation of Brown University received a report from its Facilities and Design Committee which included an approved design for a new $95-million Life Sciences Building and information on the purchase of a building at 70 Ship St. in the Jewelry District of Providence, which the University will retrofit for use as a biomedical research laboratory. Taken together, the two facilities will increase the University's life sciences research space by 75 percent.
News Release   03-041    10/11/2003   Nickel
Independent Review Committee releases report on Smoke Shop raid
The Independent Review Committee which reviewed the July 14 State Police raid on the Narragansett Tribe's Smoke Shop has presented its final report to Gov. Donald L. Carcieri, with additional copies to the Chief Sachem of the Narragansett Tribe, the superintendent of the Rhode Island State Police, and the Rhode Island attorney general. The executive summary of the report follows here.
News Release   03-037    10/07/2003   Nickel
Former President Cardoso to speak on "Brazil: The Awakening Giant"
Former President of Brazil and Professor-at-Large Fernando Henrique Cardoso will discuss "Brazil: The Awakening Giant" on Friday, Oct. 17, 2003, at 5 p.m. in Starr Auditorium in MacMillan Hall. This lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-038    10/07/2003   Curtis
Grant funds workshops for graduate students writing dissertations
Brown University has received a $224,936 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to establish a program that will support graduate students during the intense and often isolating dissertation-writing experience.
News Release   03-036    10/03/2003   Cole
Graduate School size could be boon to multidisciplinary research
Brown's graduate department got its start a century ago. Though the department expanded and in 1927 became the Graduate School, it has remained small. That characteristic now proves beneficial in fostering interdisciplinary work and independent thinking across departmental lines
GSJ Story   28GSJ04b    10/03/2003   Cole
Research Notes
Crib death; depression and smoking
GSJ Story   28GSJ04d    10/03/2003   Cole
Russian librarians to meet with Brown counterparts
Five Russian library managers will spend Oct. 5-12 examining the role of libraries in American communities with Brown counterparts.
GSJ Story   28GSJ05e    10/03/2003   Sweeney
Brown/Trinity Consortium "running on all cylinders"
Just a year after it began, the Brown/Trinity Theater Consortium is already "running on all cylinders." "We succeeded immediately out of the gate in establishing ourselves as one of the most attractive programs in the country," said Oskar Eustis. "We can tell by the number of applications, the yield and the quality of the students we're attracting.
GSJ Story   28GSJ05f    10/03/2003   Curtis
Russian librarians to meet with Brown counterparts Oct. 5-12
Five Russian library managers will spend Oct. 5-12 with counterparts from Brown University to examine the role of libraries in American communities. Their visit is sponsored by the Open World Program.
News Release   03-034    10/01/2003   Sweeney
Worldwide, most governmental Web sites offer no online services
Governments around the world are using Web sites and the Internet to provide information and services to their citizens. The third annual Global e-Government Survey suggests that actual online services are not as widespread as they could be and that governments have a long way to go toward realizing the promise of Internet communications. A table ranking the governmental Web efforts of 198 countries is included.
News Release   03-032    09/29/2003   Nickel
Construction, renovation projects generate new academic, research space
Since last spring the University has undertaken more than 40 building and renovation projects, at a price of about $26 million. One of the largest projects is the new Life Sciences Building.
GSJ Story   28GSJ03a    09/26/2003   Curtis
Tobacco, investing and social responsibility
The University's Advisory Committee on Corporate Responsibility in Investing, which has recommended that Brown exclude tobacco manufacturers from the University's investment portfolio, is sponsoring a lecture series on socially responsible investing.
GSJ Story   28GSJ03b    09/26/2003   Sweeney
Brown participiates in statewide medical emergency drill
You rarely hear the words "pneumonic plague" and "enjoyment" in the course of the same conversation, but Terrie Wetle, associate dean of medicine and professor of community health, managed to combine them in her description of a bioterrorism exercise she participated in late last month.
GSJ Story   28GSJ03c    09/26/2003   Sweeney
At Brown
Memorial service; research note; more
GSJ Story   28GSJ03d    09/26/2003   Sweeney
Disability access problems plague city government Web sites
Most Web sites maintained by the governments of America's 70 largest cities fail standard tests for access by users with vision and hearing impairments, according to a new study by researchers at Brown University. Most urban government Web sites are also written at a higher reading level than the average urban American user has achieved.
News Release   03-030    09/22/2003   Nickel
Hitch a ride with safeRIDE
Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design have collaborated to provide shuttle service to faculty, staff and students through a program called safeRIDE.
GSJ Story   28GSJ02a    09/19/2003   Cole
Cape Verde Prime Minister Neves to give Ogden Lecture Oct. 2
Prime Minister Jose Maria Neves of the Republic of Cape Verde will give a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lecture on International Affairs on Thursday, Oct. 2, 2003, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. Neves will speak on "New Horizons for African Leadership in a Globalizing World." The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-029    09/18/2003   Curtis
Voters support Narragansett casino but worry about political corruption
A statewide survey of 367 voters conducted Sept. 13-15, 2003, finds that a majority of Rhode Island voters would support a gambling casino built by the Narragansett Tribe, but many worry about political and gaming industry corruption. The survey also finds a dead heat between Howard Dean, John Kerry and Joseph Lieberman in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.
News Release   03-028    09/17/2003   Nickel
Readability is a problem for state and federal government Web sites
The fourth annual "e-government" survey, conducted at Brown University, finds that most state and federal government Web sites are written at too high a grade level for average American users. About one-third of sites examined satisfied recognized standards for accessibility by users with vision or hearing impairment. Tables ranking state and federal Web sites are included.
News Release   03-025    09/15/2003   Nickel
Mikhail Gorbachev to receive honorary degree and give Ogden Lecture
Former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev will give a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lecture on International Affairs, titled "Democracy's Impact on Globalization," on Monday, Sept. 29, 2003, at noon on Lincoln Field on the Brown University campus. Gorbachev will also receive an honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from the University.
News Release   03-026    09/15/2003   Curtis
Brown to offer two-day conference on global corporate governance
Corporate leaders, elected officials and management scholars will meet at Brown University Sept. 19 and 20, 2003, for a conference on corporate governance in the 21st century. The Friday evening keynote panel, featuring many of the conference presenters, is open to the public without charge. It begins at 6:30 p.m. in C.V. Starr Auditorium in MacMillan Hall, Thayer and George streets.
News Release   03-027    09/15/2003   Nickel
Concerts, master class to celebrate centennial of Hutchings-Votey organ
Brown will celebrate the 100th birthday of its Hutchings-Votey organ in a concert featuring University Organist Mark Steinbach and the Brown University Chorus on Friday, Sept. 19, 2003, at 8 p.m. in Sayles Hall. The centennial observance will continue on Sunday, Sept. 21, when noted British organist David Briggs will give a recital at 3 p.m. and a master class at 5 p.m. in Sayles Hall. All three events are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-022    09/09/2003   Curtis
Fixing Iraq Bush's way won't make America safer
Americans should not fool themselves into thinking that the $87 billion President Bush will request for Iraqi reconstruction is being spent for national defense, writes William O. Beeman. The only way to stop terrorism is for the United States to stop being a magnet for terrorist operations. That means, among other things, internationalizing military operations and treating Muslim people and Islamic culture with the respect accorded to other peoples and nations.
News Release   03-019    09/08/2003   Nickel
Independent Review Committee to resume public meetings Sept. 9
The fourth public interview session conducted by the Independent Review Committee will begin at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2003, in the main lounge of the Gregorian Quadrangle, 101 Thayer St. on the Brown University campus.
News Release   03-020    09/08/2003   Nickel
Brown University revises its non-academic discipline system
Brown University's newly revised system for non-academic discipline, which is in effect beginning with the 2003-04 academic year, provides additional options for disposition of cases. It is based on a new statement of principles that applies to all members of the University community -- faculty and staff as well as students.
News Release   03-021    09/08/2003   Nickel
For the nation's gay high school students, separate will never be equal
New York's Harvey Milk School opened this fall to serve a student body consisting of gay students, writes Laura Szalacha. Over the long haul, separate is never equal, and separation does not necessarily serve the best interests of students, gay or straight. But for now, safety is the primary concern; a separate school can end the hazing and attacks many gay students face.
News Release   03-018    09/05/2003   Nickel
Carol Moseley Braun to give Krieger Memorial Lecture Sept. 10
Former U.S. senator and current presidential candidate Carol Moseley Braun (D-Ill.) will give the 2003 Noah Krieger Memorial Lecture Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2003, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   03-017    09/03/2003   Curtis
Brown's faculty to begin academic year 2003-04 at largest size ever
Following an unusually successful year of recruiting, the Brown University faculty will begin the 2003-04 academic year at its largest size ever -- 601 regular faculty members. (See also brief profiles of new faculty in 03-015a (humanities), 03-015b (social sciences) 03-015d (physical sciences) and 03-015c. (life sciences.)
News Release   03-015    09/02/2003   Nickel
Most R.I. quasi-public agencies do not comply with public access laws
A study of the 23 Rhode Island quasi-public agencies that were included in the governor's budget for fiscal year 2004 shows that more than one-third submitted incomplete minutes of their meetings during 2002 to the secretary of state and more than one-quarter submitted no minutes at all. The study, conducted by the Taubman Center for Public Policy at Brown University, also found that no agency submitted all of its minutes within the statutory deadline.
News Release   03-016    09/02/2003   Nickel
Bell Gallery to present Faculty Exhibition 2003
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present its tri-annual exhibition of works of art by members of the Brown faculty beginning Sept. 6 and continuing through Oct. 26, 2003. An opening reception for the artists is set for Friday, Sept. 5, at 5:30 p.m.; several of the artists will also discuss their work on Thursday, Oct. 17, from 5 to 7 p.m. All three events are free and open to the public.
News Release   03-014    08/28/2003   Nickel
Brown moves to protect its network servers, e-mail and Internet access
Brown University is sending more than 50 members of its computing staff into dormitories in an effort to protect the University's network servers and maintain an acceptable level of service.
News Release   03-012    08/26/2003   Nickel
Independent Review Committee concludes first round of public hearings
The Independent Review Committee studying the incident at the Narragansett Smoke Shop concluded its first round of public hearings today. Further interviews, if required, will likely be scheduled after Labor Day.
News Release   03-011    08/21/2003   Nickel
Independent Review Committee questions elected officials, State Police
The Independent Review Committee will resume its public hearings at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20, in Room 120 of List Art Center, 64 College St. on the Brown campus.
News Release   03-009    08/19/2003   Nickel
Libya is a case study in fighting state-sponsored terrorism
Libya's agreement to take responsibility for the Lockerbie Pan Am bombing, to renounce terrorism and to set up a $2.7-billion fund for families of the victims did not receive the attention it deserved, writes Brent Stuart Goodwin. It was part of a successful campaign against state sponsored terrorism that produced measurable change in an individual and a nation's foreign policy.
News Release   03-007    08/18/2003   Nickel
Why file-sharing doesn't feel like stealing
Americans are more likely to obey laws they perceive to be morally right, laws they believe were enacted through an impartial legislative process, writes Marc Perlman. The Recording Industry Association of America, among the wealthiest and most influential of industry lobbyists, has a long way to go to convince Americans that laws governing file-sharing were enacted for the good of the general public. It's easier to sue.
News Release   03-008    08/18/2003   Nickel
Independent Review Committee sets hearings for Aug. 19-21
The Independent Review Committee established by Gov. Donald L. Carcieri to review the incident at the Narragansett Smoke Shop and events that led up to it has scheduled a series of public meetings on the matter on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 19, 20 and 21, 2003, in the auditorium of Brown University's List Art Center, 64 College St., Providence, R.I.
News Release   03-006    08/15/2003   Curtis
Smoke Shop: Statement by the Independent Review Committee
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons, who chairs the Independent Review Committee established by R.I. Gov. Donald L. Carcieri to review the incident at the Narragansett Smoke Shop, issued the following statement on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2003.
News Release   03-005    08/14/2003   Nickel
At Brown
Marisa Quinn to work for Simmons; awards and honors; off the shelf
GSJ Story   27GSJ31a    07/11/2003   Sweeney
Few pediatricians feel comfortable addressing patients' weight issues
Elissa Jelalian, assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior, surveyed more than 1,000 pediatricians practicing in Southern New England. One-fourth reported that they were not at all or only slightly competent, and 20 percent reported feeling not at all or only slightly comfortable.
GSJ Story   27GSJ31d    07/11/2003   Cole
Financial factors play part in nursing homes' use of feeding tubes
Money may be at the root of the common practice of inserting feeding tubes into nursing home residents with end-stage dementia, even though the treatment neither delays death nor improve quality of life in the patients. That was one of several chilling findings of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Four of the five authors of the study are based in Brown's Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research.
GSJ Story   27GSJ31e    07/11/2003   Turner
Brown and MBL create an alliance for teaching and research
Brown University and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., today established a formal institutional affiliation that will support the joint programs of education and research in biology, biomedicine and environmental sciences.
News Release   03-001    07/07/2003   Turner
Brown University to hold 12th annual college fair Thursday, July 10
Brown University's Pre-College Summer Program will present its 12th annual college fair Thursday, July 10, 2003, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Free and open to the public, the event is the largest summer college fair in New England and draws more than 100 colleges and 1,000 aspiring college students to campus each year.
News Release   02-158    06/27/2003   Howell
Voters back greater health care and pension contributions by state workers
When asked about possible means of dealing with the state budget deficit, a majority of 389 voters surveyed June 21-22, 2003, favor requiring state workers to pay a portion of their health care premiums and a larger share of their pension costs. They also favor ending subsidies to dog owners at Lincoln Park. The survey also finds strong support for the job performances of Gov. Don Carcieri and Providence Mayor David Cicilline.
News Release   02-157    06/23/2003   Sweeney
Marisa Quinn named assistant to the President at Brown University
Marisa A. Quinn, currently director of community and government relations, will become assistant to the President at Brown University on Aug. 1, 2003.
News Release   02-155    06/19/2003   Nickel
Op-Ed: Occupational hazards
If in the coming months Americans begin to notice cutbacks in schools, libraries and public transportation, writes Elliott Cola, remember this: Our leaders decided to fund military occupation in Iraq rather than vital services here. And what's worse: If we fail to provide services in Iraq -- services that will be expensive -- we should expect nothing but chaos and violence from the occupation.
News Release   02-153    06/18/2003   Nickel
Op-Ed: What academia means to me
Sometimes dropping a tiny piece of information into position allows the larger picture to snap into sharper focus, writes Timothy Chambers. The hunt for that tiny piece of information and for the deeper understanding it makes possible is a major satisfaction of the academic life.
News Release   02-154    06/18/2003   Nickel
Op-Ed: Wisdom from Phil: Bush is in trouble
A San Diego barber and one of the world's most famous anthropologists both understand Americans' unspoken rules for the use of force and their strong preference for straight talk and a square deal. While they might follow different lines of reasoning, William O. Beeman writes, the barber and anthropologist would end up at the same conclusion: Bush is in trouble.
News Release   02-152    06/12/2003   Nickel
Corporation of Brown University elects eight new trustees
At its Commencement Weekend meeting May 24, 2003, the Corporation of Brown Uni-versity elected eight new members to its Board of Trustees: Alain J.P. Belda; Cornelia Dean; Galen V. Henderson, M.D.; Bobby Jindal; Samuel M. Mencoff; Kenneth J. O'Keefe; Eileen M. Rudden; and Laurinda Hope Spear.
News Release   02-146    06/11/2003   Sweeney
New agreement nurtures and sustains Brown's relationship with city
On Thursday, June 5, 2003, Mayor David Cicilline and the presidents of Brown University, Johnson & Wales University, Providence College and Rhode Island School of Design announced an unprecedented financial agreement which will provide the City of Providence nearly $50 million in voluntary contributions over 20 years. The agreement includes a 15-year process whereby colleges can convert commercial properties to tax-exempt educational uses by making declining annual contributions based on the property tax. The text of President Ruth J. Simmons' announcement to the campus community follows here.
News Release   02-148    06/07/2003   Nickel
Brown Corporation approves budget, adopts new governance plan
At its regular meeting May 24, 2003, the Corporation of Brown University approved a $512-million operating budget, authorized issuance of tax-exempt bonds, authorized several major campus planning initiatives, and adopted a proposal for restructuring the Corporation's own governance procedures.
News Release   02-149    06/06/2003   Nickel
Nicotine changes newborn behavior similar to heroin and crack
For the first time, researchers report that nicotine exposure in the womb produces behavioral changes in babies similar to those found in newborns of women who use crack cocaine or heroin during pregnancy. The study by Brown Medical School researchers appears in the June issue of Pediatrics.
News Release   02-143    06/02/2003   Turner
Novelist Shahrnush Parsipur named first International Writing Fellow
The Program in Creative Writing and the Watson Institute for International Studies have named Shahrnush Parsipur, an Iranian novelist, as the recipient of the inaugural International Writers Project Fellowship.
News Release   02-147    06/02/2003   Curtis
Brown, Providence, merchants announce plans for improvements
Brown University has joined with the City of Providence and property owners and merchants along Thayer Street to improve conditions in the area by establishing the Thayer Street Improvement District.
News Release   02-145    05/29/2003   Sweeney
Brown to confer 2,123 degrees at 235th Commencement May 26, 2003
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons will confer 2,123 degrees during the University's 235th Commencement Monday, May 26, 2003. (News advisory with degree counts by category.)
News Release   02-144    05/23/2003   Nickel
Brown University will confer seven honorary degrees on May 26
Brown University will confer seven honorary degrees during Commencement exercises Monday, May 26, 2003. The recipients are actress Laura Linney; RISD President Roger Mandle; former U.S. Sen. Sam Nunn; Lowery Stokes Sims of the Studio Museum in Harlem; genetic researcher Joan Argetsinger Steitz; Brian Urquhart, former undersecretary-general of the U.N.; and Chinese dissident Xu Wenli.
News Release   02-138    05/15/2003   Sweeney
Bell Gallery to present work of four artists in "Obsessive Patterns"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present the work of Rhode Island artists Tayo Heuser, Jane Masters, Dean Snyder and Neal Walsh in a new group exhibition titled "Obsessive Patterns," opening June 7 and continuing through July 6, 2003. The artists will speak about their work during a 5:30 p.m. opening reception Friday, June 6. The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.
News Release   02-139    05/14/2003   Curtis
Xu Wenli to deliver baccalaureate address May 25
Xu Wenli, who spent 16 years in Chinese prison for his pro-democracy activities, will address graduating seniors at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 25, 2003, in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America. He will speak about "My Journey to Brown: A Personal Odyssey."
News Release   02-136    05/13/2003   Sweeney
Events planned for Commencement/Reunion Weekend 2003
In addition to reunion events and formal academic exercises, the University offers campus guests a variety of opportunities, from theater and music performances to forums and historical exhibitions, during Commencement/Reunion Weekend 2003. Most offer free admission and are open to the public.
News Release   02-137    05/13/2003   Curtis
John Carter Brown Library Medal awarded to Jose Amor y Vazquez
Jose Amor y Vasquez, professor emeritus of Hispanic studies, has received the John Carter Brown Library medal for his service as an advisor, author, editor, translator and long-time supporter of the library. The medal was presented during a ceremony on Friday, May 9, 2003, at the library.
News Release   02-133    05/09/2003   Curtis
Seth Berkley, M.D., to speak at Medical School Convocation
Seth Berkley, M.D., founder and president of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, will speak at the Brown Medical School Commencement Convocation Monday, May 26, 2003, in the First Unitarian Church of Providence. Medical graduates will also hear talks by Angela Anderson, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics, and Giridhar Mallya, a member of the graduating class. The convocation will begin at 8:45 a.m.
News Release   02-134    05/09/2003   Turner
Graduate School will begin centennial celebration at Commencement
The Brown University Graduate School will begin the celebration of its centennial during the University's 235th Commencement, Friday, May 23, to Monday, May 26, 2003. Brown's original "Graduate Department"was established in 1903.
News Release   02-135    05/09/2003   Howell
New sensor bares faults in smallest possible, most advanced circuits
Scientists at Brown University have created a magnetic-sensing microscope that allows them to watch electricity flow through the world's tiniest components. They are using the device to find defects in integrated circuits and micromachinery. The design opens the door to wider application of magnetic-sensing technology for imaging electrical current flow. The microscope is described in the May 12, 2003, issue of Applied Physics Letters.
News Release   02-125    05/07/2003   Turner
Use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia is common, study finds
Although guidelines do not exist for the use of medication to treat pediatric sleep disorders, about 75 percent of pediatricians surveyed had recommended some type of medication for that purpose within the previous six months. Pediatric sleep disturbances are among the most common and challenging complaints, and a set of clinical experience-based guidelines needs to be developed, according to a study in the May Pediatrics.
News Release   02-126    05/05/2003   Cole
Upholding Brown tradition, two seniors will address graduating class
Martha Lackritz of San Antonio, Texas, and Onyekachukwu Iloabachie of Queens, N.Y., will deliver orations during Brown's 235th Commencement, Monday, May 26, 2003, at 10:30 a.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   02-132    05/05/2003   Curtis
Sleep loss and driving do not mix for medical residents, study finds
In a driving simulation, fatigued pediatric residents performed equally or worse than they did when moderately intoxicated, according to a pilot study presented at the 2003 Pediatric Academic Societies' meeting by Brown Medical School researchers.
News Release   02-100    05/03/2003   Turner
Residents often feel unprepared to break bad news to kids and parents
Medical residents have not had enough education or experience in sharing bad news with younger patients and their families, suggests a new study by researchers at Brown Medical School and Dartmouth Medical School. Their research appears in the May-June issue of Ambulatory Pediatrics.
News Release   02-124    05/03/2003   Turner
Self-esteem as a social dilemma
"Perhaps self-esteem is a self-limiting commodity," writes Joachim Krueger, associate professor of psychology who served on a task force charged with determining the facts about self-esteem gleaned from more than two decades of scientific research. The task force reviewed 15,000 published papers, and reported its findings in this month's journal of the American Psychological Society.
GSJ Story   27GSJ26c    05/02/2003   
Research fails to support link between high self-esteem, positive behavior
Many of the positive outcomes attributed to high self-esteem are not substantiated by research, according to Brown psychologist Joachim I. Krueger. Krueger and faculty from three other universities formed that conclusion after reviewing more than two decades of objective research studies on self-esteem at the invitation of the American Psychological Society. Their report appears in this month's issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a supplement to Psychological Science.
GSJ Story   27GSJ26e    05/02/2003   Cole
Demand for wood may lead to forest growth, not decline, study says
Increased demand for forest products was a cause of increased forest cover in India during the last three decades, according to a joint study by researchers at Brown and Harvard University in the May 2003 Quarterly Journal of Economics. The finding contradicts the idea that economic development inevitably leads to deforestation.
News Release   02-127    05/01/2003   Cole
Senators' approval ratings influenced largely by factors beyond their control
Senators' own attempts to influence approval ratings have less effect than factors beyond their control, according to a new study. Researchers examined eight factors related to senatorial approval ratings over a 17-year period, from 1981 to 1997. Their findings are published in the May "Legislative Studies Quarterly."
News Release   02-121    04/30/2003   Cole
Newport Art Museum hosts JCB Library exhibit on maritime history
The Newport Art Museum is hosting a new exhibit of books, maps and manuscripts from the holdings of the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University. Those materials -- all related to maritime history -- are on display as "The Boundless Deep ...: The European Conquest of the Oceans 1450 to 1840," through July 27, 2003.
News Release   02-122    04/29/2003   Howell
Brown University Library plays key role in "Rhode Island Treasures"
The Brown University Library is lending a variety of historically significant items from its collection for display in "Rhode Island Treasures," a Smithsonian exhibition tracing more than 350 years of Rhode Island history. The exhibit will open May 10 and continue through June 15, 2003, at the Rhode Island Convention Center.
News Release   02-123    04/29/2003   Curtis
At Brown
Wriston Fellowships; Faculty Teaching Awards; announcements from Human Resouces, Financial Services; Off the Shelf; more
GSJ Story   27GSJ25a    04/25/2003   Sweeney
Brown brings "Annie Junior" to Providence Schools
In the culmination of a collaboration among Brown, Trinity Repertory Company and the New York-based Broadway Junior program, students from Asa Messer, Robert L. Bailey IV and Charles Fortes schools in Providence and the Gordon School in East Providence will each perform "Annie Junior," a one-hour version of the award-winning Broadway musical "Annie," on May 3 at Trinity Rep.
GSJ Story   27GSJ25b    04/25/2003   Curtis
Cave painting for the 21st century
The University's newest art exhibition has a decidedly 21st century flavor: Its works are three-dimensional and interactive. "Works from the Cave" features artworks created within the University's virtual reality lab, called the Cave. When entering the Cave, visitors remove their shoes and don special shutter glasses to synchronize the vision with alternating stereo projections on the walls; special hardware and software keep track of visitors' positions and movements, changing the images in a way that allows them to feel immersed in the virtual space.
GSJ Story   27GSJ25c    04/25/2003   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Deborah Cohen on troops' return from war
Deborah A. Cohen, assistant professor of history, recently answered questions from Kristen Cole about the reception of veterans returning home after war, and what the veterans of the war with Iraq may face. Cohen is author of the book "The War Come Home: Disabled Veterans in Britain and Germany, 1914-1939," in which she analyzed the different ways in which two nations cared for their disabled after World War I.
GSJ Story   27GSJ25e    04/25/2003   Cole
Brown University is monitoring one possible case of SARS
Brown University administrators and public health officials are monitoring a possible case of SARS involving a faculty member who recently traveled to Toronto. All members of the campus community are being notified about that case and are receiving information about SARS.
News Release   02-120    04/24/2003   Nickel
Brown receives two-year, $750,000 grant for advancing innovation
The Atlantic Philanthropies has awarded Brown University a two-year, $750,000 grant in support of academic innovation -- particularly pedagogical and curricular initiatives -- and to recognize President Ruth J. Simmons' distinguished campus leadership.
News Release   02-113    04/23/2003   Nickel
Sportswriter Frank Deford to speak on "Hype and Hypocrisy" April 30
Award-winning journalist, author and sports commentator Frank Deford will speak on "Sports: The Hype and Hypocrisy" Wednesday, April 30, 2003, at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Deford's lecture, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Brown Lecture Board.
News Release   02-119    04/23/2003   Curtis
Thomas Friedman to give Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture May 1
New York Times columnist and award-winning author Thomas L. Friedman will deliver the third annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture Thursday, May 1, 2003, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The evening's program, free and open to the public, will include presentation of the annual Casey Shearer Memorial Awards for Excellence in Creative Nonfiction.
News Release   02-116    04/18/2003   Curtis
Howard Foundation announces 13 fellowship recipients for 2003-04
The Board of Administration of the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation has announced recipients of fellowships for the 2003-04 academic year, all of them in history, history of science, or political science. Fellowships for the 2004-2005 academic year will be awarded in the field of creative writing. The Howard Foundation is administered by Brown University.
News Release   02-115    04/17/2003   Nickel
Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan to speak April 15 on death penalty
The Brown University Lecture Board will welcome former governor of Illinois George Ryan and Lawrence Marshall, the legal director for the Center on Wrongful Convictions, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The pair will speak on the death penalty.
News Release   02-112    04/14/2003   Curtis
Bell Gallery and Creative Arts Council to exhibit "Works from the Cave"
The David Winton Bell Gallery and the Creative Arts Council will present "Works from the Cave" in limited exhibition on April 26 and May 3, 2003, in the University's virtual reality lab at the Technology Center for Advanced Scientific and Computing Visualization. This exhibit is free and open to the public, but advance reservations are required.
News Release   02-114    04/14/2003   Curtis
Odors summon emotion and influence behavior, new study says
Psychologist Rachel S. Herz found that college students stymied by a computer game exhibited their frustration during a later word test when they were in a room with the same scent. Herz will present her study at the annual meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS) April 13, 2003, at 8 a.m.
News Release   02-090    04/13/2003   Cole
Master plan offers suggestions for the campus decades down the road
How might the Brown campus grow and change over the next several decades to accommodate its ambitious strategic and academic goals? That question was posed to the architectural firm of Kliment & Halsband, which was hired to develop a master plan for campus that would support the Initiatives for Academic Enrichment. Architect Frances Halsband led an analysis of existing buildings, land use, open space, campus history and zoning provisions, and arrived at some preliminary findings, which she shared with members of the Brown community during two meetings held April 8.
GSJ Story   27GSJ24b    04/11/2003   Sweeney
Brown begins national search for senior institutional diversity officer
Brown University has established a new position with overall responsibility for all programs of institutional diversity. The new position -- associate provost and director of institutional diversity -- will be part of the president's cabinet and will work closely with the president, provost and other senior officers. President Ruth J. Simmons is chairing the 17-member selection committee.
News Release   02-109    04/10/2003   Nickel
Op-Ed: Meanwhile across the border, Iran's war apprehension is growing
What effect might the American military action in Iraq have next door in Iran? Iranians may be overly cautious, writes William O. Beeman, but the signs are everywhere that Iran is seriously concerned about a U.S. military threat.
News Release   02-111    04/10/2003   Nickel
Two Brown faculty receive Wriston Fellowships for 2003-04
Brooke Harrington, assistant professor of sociology and public policy, and David H. Laidlaw, assistant professor of computer science, recently received Wriston Fellowships, one of the highest awards the University bestows upon its teaching faculty.
News Release   02-110    04/09/2003   Cole
Internet weight loss program effective among adults at risk for diabetes
In a 12-month study of an Internet weight loss program, overweight adults at risk for type 2 diabetes lost enough weight to reduce their chances of getting the disease. Those who received regular e-mail counseling from a therapist experienced the greatest success. The study, led by Deborah F. Tate of the Brown Medical School, is in the April 9, 2003, Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   02-105    04/08/2003   Cole
Oscar nominee Todd Haynes to speak at Brown April 11 and 12
Writer/director and Academy Award nominee Todd Haynes, a 1985 graduate of Brown University will speak about his work on Friday, April 11, 2003, at 3 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching and again on Saturday, April 12, 2003, at the Cable Car Cinema, following a 4:15 p.m. screening of his film "Far from Heaven."Both events are free and open to the public.
News Release   02-108    04/08/2003   Curtis
New study documents domestic violence by race, income in R.I.
Although black and Hispanic women comprised 6 percent of Rhode Island's 1990 population, they represented more than 17 percent of victims in police reports documenting domestic violence and sexual assault, according to a Brown University study published in the journal Public Health Reports.
News Release   02-106    04/07/2003   Turner
Creative Arts Council to sponsor gala performance of "Grease" April 30
The University's Creative Arts Council will host a one-night gala performance of the Broadway musical hit "Grease" on Wednesday, April 30, 2003, at 7:30 p.m. in the Providence Performing Arts Center. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Creative Arts Council programs.
News Release   02-107    04/07/2003   Curtis
English Department dedication set for April 7-8
Noted historian and author Henry Louis Gates Jr. will give a keynote lecture in a series of events set for April 7 and 8 to celebrate the dedication of the new English Department.
GSJ Story   27GSJ23c    04/04/2003   Curtis
Policy paper examines effects of delayed childbearing in Europe
Putting the brakes on the ever-increasing age of childbearing in Europe would greatly moderate the continent's trend toward population aging and decline. That's according to a policy paper in the March 28 issue of "Science" co-written by Brian O'Neill of the Watson Institute
GSJ Story   27GSJ23d    04/04/2003   Turner
Last Word: Our Choice: VIP or RIP
The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) prevents potential problems for drug-exposed babies by intervening early in the infant's life – and it saves money. In this case it is actually cheaper to prevent problems than to wait for them to occur (by Barry Lester and Jeremiah S. Jeremiah Jr.).
GSJ Story   27GSJ23e    04/04/2003   
Braun, Joukowsky will receive Sheridan Awards April 30
Lundy Braun, associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, and Martha Sharp Joukowsky, professor of anthropology and Old World art and archaeology, have been selected to receive the Harriet W. Sheridan Award for Distinguished Contribution to Teaching and Learning.
GSJ Story   27GSJ23f    04/04/2003   Sweeney
Henry Louis Gates Jr. to speak on "Encyclopedia Africana" April 7
Noted scholar and teacher of African and African-American history and culture Henry Louis Gates Jr. will speak on "W.E.B. Du Bois and the Encyclopedia Africana" Monday, April 7, 2003, at 5 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This lecture is the keynote address in a series of events planned to celebrate the dedication of the English Department's new academic home.
News Release   02-104    03/31/2003   Curtis
Medical devices may benefit from Brown fuel cell technology
Two new tiny fuel cells developed at Brown may make long-running medical implants more of a reality. The cells offer features sought by manufacturers hoping to provide long-term power for medical devices such as implants that monitor glucose levels in diabetics. The lead scientist on the project is Tayhas Palmore, associate professor of engineering, biology and medicine.
GSJ Story   27GSJ22b    03/28/2003   Turner
Second Ivy Film Festival to feature Tim Robbins, original films
Critically acclaimed actor and director Tim Robbins will share his cinematic expertise with budding filmmakers when Brown hosts the second annual Ivy Film Festival April 4-6.
GSJ Story   27GSJ22c    03/28/2003   Curtis
23 receive Salomon Faculty Research Awards
The Office of the Vice President for Research has announced this year's recipients of Richard B. Salomon Faculty Research Awards. This program was established to support excellence in scholarly work by providing funding for faculty research projects deemed to be of exceptional merit. From 1995-99, the program was funded by the bequest of the late Richard B. Salomon, chancellor of the University. Brown has funded the continuation of the program since 1999.
GSJ Story   27GSJ22e    03/28/2003   Sweeney
A brave new world in live performance comes to campus April 4-6
Audiences will get a preview of the future of stage performance when the University's arts departments present their seventh annual Festival of Art and Technology, "Video, Technology and Performance," April 4-6.
GSJ Story   27GSJ22g    03/28/2003   Curtis
Julie Sedivy analyzes advertising and its effect on society
Julie Sedivy, a cognitive and linguistic researcher, says science holds the answers to ques-tions about the impact of advertising on society. Sedivy teaches some 150 undergraduates each spring about "Language, Truth, and Advertising."
News Release   02-096    03/27/2003   Cole
New advance in fuel cell technology may help power medical implants
With designs that hurdle several scientific barriers, two new fuel cells developed at Brown University are models for power sources that may one day energize medical implants or remote sensors. Brown engineers discussed the new cells Thursday March 27, 2003, in New Orleans at the 225th national meeting of the American Chemical Society.
News Release   02-098    03/27/2003   Turner
Bell Gallery to exhibit "Walter Feldman: The Work of Five Decades"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition, "Walter Feldman: The Work of Five Decades," April 12 to May 26, 2003, celebrating the artistic and educational endeavors of a long-time faculty member. An opening reception is scheduled for April 11, 2003, at 5:30 p.m. in the gallery. The reception and the exhibit are free and open to the public.
News Release   02-102    03/26/2003   Curtis
Arts collaborators present "Video, Technology and Performance" April 4-6
"Video, Technology and Performance," the seventh annual Festival of Art and Technology, April 4-6, 2003, brings together a multidisciplinary group of innovators exploring new concepts and interactive technologies for live performance. The festival begins with a free presentation of "Falling Up" and "Future of Memory" April 4 at 8 p.m. in Stuart Theatre.
News Release   02-101    03/25/2003   Curtis
NBC's Andrea Mitchell to receive Welles Hangen Award March 30
Andrea Mitchell, chief foreign affairs correspondent for NBC News, will receive Brown's Welles Hangen Award for Superior Achievement in Journalism on Sunday, March 30, 2003, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. Mitchell will also give the keynote lecture titled "Pax Americana." The public is welcome.
News Release   02-095    03/20/2003   Curtis
High school students travel to state capitols for civic education program
High school students from Connecticut, Illinois, Nebraska, Rhode Island, and Utah, will travel to their state capitols March 21 through April 18 to debate the role of the U.S. in the world, the war with Iraq, and critical international concerns on the environment, immigration, trade, and conflict resolution. The students are participating in the Capitol Forum on America's Future, designed by Brown University's Choices for the 21st Century Education Program.
News Release   02-097    03/20/2003   Cole
Valerie Petit Wilson named executive director of Leadership Alliance
Valerie Petit Wilson, currently deputy director of the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research and clinical associate professor of environmental health sciences at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, has been named executive director of the Leadership Alliance at Brown University. Wilson will begin her work at Brown July 1, 2003.
News Release   02-080    03/19/2003   Nickel
Brown hosts second annual Ivy Film Festival and actor Tim Robbins
Brown will host the second annual Ivy Film Festival April 4-6, 2003. The festival features filmmaking and screenwriting competitions, as well as a keynote lecture by actor/director Tim Robbins and a series of film screenings, lectures and panel discussions. The Robbins lecture is reserved for students, but the remainder of the festival is open to the public.
News Release   02-094    03/19/2003   Curtis
Andrea Mitchell to open 23rd Brown/Providence Journal conference
Acclaimed foreign affairs reporter Andrea Mitchell will deliver the Michael P. Metcalf-Howard R. Swearer Memorial Lecture to open the 23rd annual Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference. The conference, "A Time of Great Consequence: America and the World," runs March 30 through April 4, 2003. Mitchell will give her address, titled "Pax Americana," on Sunday, March 30, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green.
News Release   02-092    03/17/2003   Howell
Brown to host ASEH conference, Pulitzer winner Jared Diamond
Brown University will host the annual meeting of the American Society for Environmental History, titled "Frontiers in Environmental History: Mainstreaming the ‘Marginal,'" March 26-30, 2003, at the Providence Biltmore Hotel. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jared Diamond will open the conference when he speaks Wednesday, March 26, at 7:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green.
News Release   02-091    03/14/2003   Curtis
Brown teams with Trinity Rep and local schools for "Annie Junior"
Brown University and Trinity Repertory Company are collaborating to launch a pilot program that will introduce students from four local schools to the theater arts. The students and their teachers will mount productions of "Annie Junior," a product of Music Theatre International's Broadway Junior program. The project is sponsored by Brown's Creative Arts Council.
News Release   02-089    03/13/2003   Curtis
Brown helps Hope High establish much-needed computer laboratory
Brown University's donation of 30 new desktop computers to Hope High School helps establish a new computer lab and bolster the high school's technology resources. Hope principal Nancy Mullen and Brown President Ruth J. Simmons celebrate the formal opening of the lab on March 11, 2003, at 9:30 a.m. at Hope High.
News Release   02-084    03/11/2003   Howell
The success of colleges and universities is crucial to R.I. cities and towns
As part of his budget, presented Wednesday evening, March 5, 2003, Gov. Donald Carcieri proposed that cities and towns be allowed to tax nonprofit private colleges and universities, eliminating a tax-exempt status that dates to the 18th century. Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons has issued the following statement in response.
News Release   02-086    03/07/2003   Nickel
Abraham Verghese, M.D., to speak on meaning in medical life
Abraham Verghese, M.D., author of "My Own Country--A Doctor's Story," will give the 11th annual Harriet W. Sheridan Literature and Medicine Lecture when he speaks on "The Search for Meaning in a Medical Life" on Wednesday, March 19, 2003, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-087    03/07/2003   Curtis
Survey finds many hospitals dispense alcohol to patients
Two Brown researchers and colleagues have found that many hospitals prescribe alcohol for medicinal purposes, yet clinical studies find alcohol uneffective for such uses.
GSJ Story   27GSJ20a    03/07/2003   Turner
New IT security chief keeping tabs on copyright infringement
CIS's new security officer, Connie Sadler, hopes to educate Brown community regarding the legality of downloading copyrighted material
GSJ Story   27GSJ20c    03/07/2003   Montgomery
Athletic trainers help save fan's life
The new automated external defibrillators that were installed recently in Brown athletic facilities come to the rescue at a recent women's basketball game after two Brown trainers notice a fan in trouble.
GSJ Story   27GSJ20d    03/07/2003   Unassigned
Janine Bempechat looks at poor students who succeed, those who don't
Education researcher Janine Bempechat is leading a two-year study in the United States, Great Britain and Russia, attempting to learn why some teens from low-income backgrounds are motivated to achieve academically and others are not. The project is an offshoot of Bempechat's study of achievement differences between Catholic and public school students in the United States.
News Release   02-085    03/06/2003   Cole
Collector of rare books Maury Bromsen to receive President's Medal
The President's Medal, the highest award a Brown University president may bestow, will be presented to Maury A. Bromsen, March 12, 2003, at 5:30 p.m., during a ceremony in the John Carter Brown Library. The award recognizes Bromsen's lifetime dedication to collecting and preserving historic books and manuscripts.
News Release   02-083    03/05/2003   Cole
Former Sen. Gary Hart to speak on "Restoration of the Republic"
Former senator and presidential candidate Gary Hart will speak on "Restoration of the Republic" Tuesday, March 18, 2003, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This John Hazen White Sr. Lecture, sponsored by the Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions, is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-081    03/03/2003   Curtis
Former Attorney General Janet Reno to speak on terrorism March 17
Former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno will deliver a Meiklejohn Lecture Monday, March 17, 2003, at 7:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall. Reno will speak on "Freedom and Terrorism." This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-082    03/03/2003   Curtis
Op-Ed: Coalition the Unwilling falters as European leaders battle populace
In America, the president stays in office for four years unless impeached, writes William O. Beeman. In a parliamentary system, the prime minister can be removed anytime on a vote of no confidence. If the United States is in the middle of an attack on Baghdad when an ally suddenly changes leadership, the war effort will revert, by default, to the unilateral action Americans fear.
News Release   02-078    02/28/2003   Nickel
Scientists and artists partner to create virtual Petra
Supported by a grant of more than $2 million from the National Science Foundation, Prof. Martha Joukowsky is receiving some unusual and innovative assistance from a team of engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists and artists. Together they are using technology to capture and restore aspects of the Great Temple of Petra for future generations. The multi-faceted project bridges research in the physical sciences and humanities.
GSJ Story   27GSJ19a    02/28/2003   Curtis
Research notes
Visual cues and hearing; gay and lesbian high school students
GSJ Story   27GSJ19c    02/28/2003   Cole
Former president of Brazil to serve as professor-at-large at Brown
Fernando Henrique Cardoso, former president of Brazil, has been appointed to a five-year term as professor-at-large at Brown University. Cardoso's appointment, based in the University's Watson Institute for International Studies, will begin July 1, 2003, and continue through June 30, 2008.
News Release   02-071    02/25/2003   Nickel
Corporation considers plans, strategic direction for University's future
At its winter meeting, Feb. 21-22, 2003, the Brown Corporation reviewed plans for the University's future. The plans and the strategic direction they represent grow out of the Initiatives for Academic Enrichment, approved by the Corporation last year.
News Release   02-072    02/25/2003   Nickel
R.I. voters rate Cicilline and Carcieri highly, disagree on Iraq war
In a statewide survey of 479 Rhode Island voters conducted Feb. 22-23, 2003, approximately two-thirds of respondents gave Mayor Cicilline and Gov. Carcieri high marks. Seventy-four percent of voters said the state is headed in the right direction. Voter responses varied widely on the advisability and timing of pursuing war in Iraq.
News Release   02-076    02/24/2003   Nickel
Randall Kennedy to speak on politics of race and marriage March 3
Noted Harvard Law School Professor Randall Kennedy will give the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture when he speaks on "Marriage and the Politics of Race in America" Monday, March 3, 2003, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching on The College Green. This lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-073    02/21/2003   Curtis
Pulitzer-winning writer N. Scott Momaday to speak March 6
Pulitzer Prize-winning author N. Scott Momaday will speak on "Native American Oral Traditions: The Stories and Storytellers" on Thursday, March 6, 2003, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-074    02/21/2003   Curtis
Brown and seven universities file amicus brief in U-Michigan cases
Brown University joined seven other academically selective universities in filing an amicus curiae brief today supporting the University of Michigan in cases pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. The brief supports the right of colleges and universities to consider race and ethnicity as part of an individualized admission process.
News Release   02-070    02/18/2003   Nickel
Eye movements indicate initial attempts to process what humans hear
Even before a speaker completes a sentence, a listener attempts to interpret what he or she is hearing by searching out visual cues, according to new research at Brown University. Julie Sedivy, assistant professor of cognitive and linguistic sciences, will discuss her findings Feb. 17, during the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting in Denver.
News Release   02-063    02/17/2003   Cole
John Carter Brown Library hosts "Plants and Publications exhibition"
The John Carter Brown Library is hosting a new exhibition, "Plants and Publications from the New World: 1492-1825," through May 1, 2003, in the library's MacMillan Reading Room. The display features botanical observations made by some of the earliest European travelers to America. The exhibit is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-069    02/17/2003   Curtis
Op-Ed: History lessons about God and war
America's past crusades offer three great lessons about God and arms. First, remember humility. Second, wartime anxieties spill over to domestic suspects. Finally, fighting for our ideals abroad can remind us to take them more seriously at home.
News Release   02-065    02/13/2003   Nickel
Brown researchers pioneer first-principles modeling of microbubble drag reduction
Brown applied mathematicians George Karniadakis and Martin Maxey are creating the first first-principles computational models of microbubbles in action. "Most of the people involved in studying microbubbles, even today, are experimentalists. We're doing the only direct numerical simulations of microbubbles in turbulent flows," says Karniadakis. Their team includes Suchuan Dong, a visiting postdoctoral research associate, and Jin Xu, a graduate student.
GSJ Story   27GSJ17b    02/07/2003   Sweeney
Lecture series on race, poverty and environment opens Feb. 10
The Center for Environmental Studies and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America will co-sponsor The Provost's Lecture Series on Race, Poverty and Environmental Justice, a semester-long program that will open Feb. 10 with a lecture by University of Michigan Professor Dorceta Taylor.
GSJ Story   27GSJ17c    02/07/2003   Curtis
Provost's lecture series on environmental justice opens Feb. 10
The Center for Environmental Studies and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America will co-sponsor The Provost's Lecture Series on Race, Poverty and Environmental Justice, a semester-long program that will open Feb. 10, 2003, with a lecture by University of Michigan Professor Dorceta Taylor. The lectures are free and open to the public.
News Release   02-061    02/05/2003   Curtis
Scholars often complicit in perpetration of mass violence, historian says
New research by Brown University historian Omer Bartov calls into question actions of academics throughout the last century. At various times, scholars legitimized and supported acts of ethnic cleansing, genocide and terrorism, Bartov writes in the current International Social Science Journal.
News Release   02-062    02/05/2003   Cole
Op-Ed: Clipping the "Barbershop" controversy
Critics charge that the film "Barbershop" is disrespectful to civil rights leaders Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Defenders say the film carries an important message about freedom of speech. In either case, news that one of the film's stars will emcee the NAACP's Image Awards show suggests that the controversy might be at an end.
News Release   02-060    01/31/2003   Nickel
PIK: A picture worth a thousand breaths
Supported by a grant from the EPA, a Brown team worked with children with asthma at Hasbro Hospital to develop a novel way to educate them about their disease and its triggers. The children have taken a series of photos portraying their environments.
GSJ Story   27GSJ16a    01/31/2003   Curtis
At Brown
Legislative Institute; calling all singers; three obituaries; more
GSJ Story   27GSJ16c    01/31/2003   Sweeney
Huidekoper discusses University's finances
In mid-December, the University announced both a nonfaculty hiring freeze and the immediate implementation of a policy for reviewing all vacant staff positions. These steps, together with ongoing savings from vacancies, are designed to help keep the budget in balance and avoid more dramatic steps. Elizabeth Huidekoper, executive vice president for finance and administration, spoke recently with the GSJ about the University's financial affairs.
GSJ Story   27GSJ16e    01/31/2003   Nickel
Video offers lessons on recovery and living
Professor Emeritus Peter Wegner beat the odds when he recovered from life-threatening injuries he suffered when he was struck by a bus. Now a new video,"Peter Wegner is Alive and Well and Living in Providence," is being used to teach students about the physical and emotional process of recovery.
GSJ Story   27GSJ16h    01/31/2003   Cole
Bell Gallery hosts "Katarzyna Kozyra: Bathhouses" exhibition
The latest Bell Gallery exhibition, two video installations filmed in a Budapest bathhouse by noted Polish artist Katarzyna Kozyra, raises questions about privacy, voyeurism, narcissism, beauty and aging.
GSJ Story   27GSJ16j    01/31/2003   Curtis
Professor's recovery from near-fatal crash the focus of teaching video
A new video about Brown computer scientist Peter Wegner's recovery from a 1999 bus accident will be used to spark discussion of ethical questions surrounding the treatment of patients with catastrophic injuries. Wegner was given a 5-percent chance of survival.
News Release   02-054    01/23/2003   Cole
Chinese dissident Xu Wenli to serve as visiting senior fellow at Brown
Xu Wenli, the Chinese pro-democracy activist whose Christmas Eve medical release from prison allowed him to emigrate to the United States, has been appointed a visiting senior fellow at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies.
News Release   02-052    01/22/2003   Nickel
Op-Ed: Who can stop the White House warriors? Only the American public
With public opinion so crucial in shaping the actions of the Bush administration, it seems certain that Americans will get a war in Iraq unless they say emphatically that they don't want it. The militants in the White House are champing at the bit. Only their fear of the voters holds them in check.
News Release   02-053    01/22/2003   Nickel
Bell Gallery to present "Katarzyna Kozyra: Bathhouses"through March 9
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present work by one of Poland's leading contemporary artists in a new exhibition titled "Katarzyna Kozyra: Bathhouses." The exhibit opens Jan. 25, 2003, and will continue through March 9, 2003. An opening reception and slide lecture on Kozyra's work are scheduled for Friday, Jan. 24, 2003, at 5:30 p.m. Both the exhibit and the reception are free and open to the public.
News Release   02-050    01/15/2003   Curtis
Pulitzer winner Paula Vogel named to creative writing professorship
Paula Vogel, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and professor of English, has been appointed the inaugural Adele Kellenberg Seaver '49 Professor of Creative Writing at Brown University.
News Release   02-049    12/17/2002   Curtis
Two recent Brown graduates win scholarships toward further study
Sasha Polakow-Suransky '01 has won a Rhodes Scholarship, and Eric Tucker '02 has won a Marshall Scholarship. Both will pursue advanced degrees at the University of Oxford next fall.
News Release   02-047    12/16/2002   Cole
DHHS designates Brown as national site for Cochrane Collaboration
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $2.3 million to Brown University for the establishment of the U.S. Cochrane Center. It is part of the Cochrane Collaboration, a global network with centers in 13 countries that promotes evidence-based healthcare.
News Release   02-045    12/12/2002   Cole
Talan Memmott awarded Brown's first electronic writing fellowship
Award-winning writer and multimedia artist Talan Memmott has been named as the University's first graduate fellow in electronic writing. The fellowship, which provides tuition and a stipend for its recipient, includes teaching opportunities that will add new course offerings in the digital arts to the University curriculum.
News Release   02-046    12/12/2002   Curtis
Brown renovates 1960s-era dining hall to create an inviting student eatery
Daily student diners increased 74 percent after a renovation to the Verney-Woolley Dining Hall at Brown University, one of two campus dining facilities for students on the meal plan. The $3-million project exchanged dark and dated decor for bright space with a skyroof where the chefs work in view of the students.
News Release   02-044    12/11/2002   Cole
At Brown
Library hours during break; EEP reminder; research note; more
GSJ Story   27GSJ14a    12/06/2002   Sweeney
Brownbrokers present a musical ‘Anna Karenina'
The Brownbrokers will bring the classic Tolstoy epic "Anna Karenina" to the stage of Stuart Theatre Dec. 5-8, in a musical adaptation written by Jillian Tucker '04.
GSJ Story   27GSJ14b    12/06/2002   Curtis
New theory explains economic growth in terms of evolutionary biology
It took an evolutionary leap in the human species to help trigger the change from centuries of economic stagnation to a state of sustained economic growth, according to the first theory that integrates evolutionary biology and economics. This research by Brown economist Oded Galor and Omer Moav from the Hebrew University is the lead article in the current Quarterly Journal of Economics.
GSJ Story   27GSJ14c    12/06/2002   Turner
Last Word
Proposals that would have the Medical School implement an across-the-board ban of gifts from the pharmaceutical industry go overboard and discount the integrity of those in the medical profession, writes Patrick Sweeney, M.D., associate dean of medicine for continuing medical education.
GSJ Story   27GSJ14d    12/06/2002   Sweeney
Scholarship organization founder donates papers to Brown library
Dr. Irving A. Fradkin, founder of Citizens'Scholarship Foundation of America, will donate to the Brown University libraries his collection of papers, tapes and other artifacts documenting the founding and growth of the organization. The papers, which will be housed at the John Hay Library, will be donated during a ceremony at Fradkin's home in Fall River, Mass., on Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2002, at noon.
News Release   02-042    12/05/2002   Curtis
New theory explains economic growth in terms of evolutionary biology
The struggle for survival that characterized most of human existence stimulated a process of natural selection that conferred an evolutionary advantage on humans who had a higher genetic predisposition for a careful rearing of the next generation. This evolutionary change permitted the Industrial Revolution to trigger a change from an epoch of stagnation to an age of sustained economic growth, according to the first theory that integrates the fields of evolutionary biology and economic growth. This research by Brown University economist Oded Galor and Omer Moav from the Hebrew University is the lead article in the current Quarterly Journal of Economics.
News Release   02-040    12/02/2002   Turner
ormer Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak to speak Dec. 10
Ehud Barak, former prime minister of Israel, will be the guest of the Brown Lecture Board on Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2002, at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   02-041    12/02/2002   Curtis
At Brown
Suuberg appointment, food drive, more
GSJ Story   27GSJ13a    11/22/2002   Sweeney
Brown-RISD course unites two disciplines, two institutions
Interdisciplinary Scientific Visualization, taught by Brown Professor David Laidlaw and RISD Professor Fritz Drury, pairs artists and programmers. The two universities have named a joint faculty committee to explore further collaboration.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13b    11/22/2002   Unassigned
Brown has hand in landmark HIV protocol
Rhode Island recently became the first state to create guidelines for treating non-healthcare workers exposed accidentally to the HIV virus. Principal author of the guidelines was research fellow Roland Merchant, M.D., of Rhode Island Hospital. Co-authors were professor Kenneth Mayer, M.D., of The Miriam Hospital and Carol Browning of the Rhode Island Department of Health. The voluntary procedures apply to people who come in contact with HIV-infected fluids, such as through sexual activity, sharing needles or by exposure to a needle or other object. The guidelines detail what antiretroviral drugs should be administered and under what circumstances.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13c    11/22/2002   Turner
Research notes
Beta-blockers; hostility and heart disease; perimenopause
GSJ Story   27GSJ13d    11/22/2002   Turner
Fathers want it all, too, anthropologist reports in new book
Brown anthropologist Nicholas Townsend's latest book, "The Package Deal: Marriage, Work and Fatherhood in Men's Lives," describes the conflicting pressures of work and home in the lives of a very familiar portion of the population: the all-American dad.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13e    11/22/2002   Cole
Decameron web reaches across the globe
An NEH grant to Italian Studies powers the "Decameron" Web site, as successive generations of students add to a mini-library of resources related to this classic collection of stories of medieval life during the Great Plague.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13f    11/22/2002   Curtis
Politics and food in Plymouth colony
Just in time for Thanksgiving, John Carter Brown Library Fellow Michael A. Lacombe is examing the ties between food and political authority in the American colonies.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13i    11/22/2002   Curtis
Newman takes cities class to Paris
Professor Karen Newman has received an NEH grant to offer a seminar on modern urban woes for teachers this summer – in Paris.
GSJ Story   27GSJ13j    11/22/2002   Sweeney
Metal baseball bats outperformed wooden bats in Brown study
Metal bats consistently outperformed wooden bats in an analysis of 502 hits off 19 baseball players at the professional minor league, collegiate, and high school level. Researchers attributed the metal bats' greater batted ball speeds to faster swings and greater elastic performance.
News Release   02-037    11/18/2002   Cole
Dean shapes curriculum for virtual medical school
Stephen R. Smith, M.D., associate dean for medical education, has devoted most of his current sabbatical to this project. He drafted a prototype for the virtual school's curriculum. He structured it around a virtual medical practice, based on the type of electronic medical charts used in the offices of real doctors.
GSJ Story   27GSJ12a    11/15/2002   Turner
Bears' linebacker tackles mycobacteriophages and comes up with new variety
Heavily recruited as a football player by MIT, Penn State, and Carnegie Mellon, Bill Brucker '04 makes most of his plays in the lab as a bio-chemistry major. In his freshman year, he became one of the youngest recipients ever to receive the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship, during which he isolated several new mycobacteriophages. (He even got to name one – "corndog" – for its shape.)
GSJ Story   27GSJ12b    11/15/2002   Montgomery
Brown has its first graduate fellow in electronic writing
Although the average reader may not have seen Talan Memmott's work, it's attracting an impressive amount of attention. Last year he was awarded the trAce/Alt-X New Media Writing Award for his piece "Lexia to Perplexia," and he was one of five finalists for the most prestigious prize yet offered in the field, the Electronic Literature Organization's prize in fiction writing. Memmott is Brown's first graduate fellow in electronic writing.
GSJ Story   27GSJ12c    11/15/2002   Curtis
At Brown
Risen on the road; funding notes
GSJ Story   27GSJ12d    11/15/2002   Sweeney
Don't kill the messenger
To tweak a cliché: Instant Messaging doesn't kill language, lack of engagement kills language, writes Brown lecturer Selma Moss-Ward. "I am delighted that Instant Messaging, e-mail and other bells and whistles of computer communication have captivated tomorrow's college students. A rising generation now views writing as a normal and enjoyable aspect of daily life, not merely as assignments to be periodically turned in," she says.
GSJ Story   27GSJ12e    11/15/2002   Cole
WebCT replaces Course Publisher
This semester, Brown introduced WebCT (Web Course Tools), a commercial product aimed at creating an online community in the classroom. Nearly 50 faculty are piloting the product, with plans to offer it to the entire faculty for the spring semester.
GSJ Story   27GSJ12g    11/15/2002   Howell
Wind Symphony to perform Brudner Memorial Concert Nov. 22
The Brown University Wind Symphony, directed by Matthew McGarrell, will present the 16th annual Eric Adam Brudner '84 Memorial Concert on Friday, Nov. 22, 2002, at 8 p.m. in Sayles Hall. The concert, which is free and open to the public, will feature the Brass Venture quintet and the music of guest composer Eric Ewazen of The Juilliard School.
News Release   02-034    11/13/2002   Curtis
Former SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt to speak Nov. 18
Former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey Pitt, who resigned his position on Nov. 5, will give a Noah Krieger '93 Memorial Lecture Monday, Nov. 18, 2002, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-033    11/08/2002   Curtis
Choices program has role in grant to teach foreign policy in high school history
Throughout the next three years, Brown will collaborate with history teachers from nearly 50 secondary schools nationwide on a program aimed at bringing extensive consideration of foreign policy into the core American history curriculum.
GSJ Story   27GSJ11c    11/08/2002   Cole
Athletes kick off 12th year of volunteering at Fox Point School
Cheering fans are nothing new for Brown's athletes, but the cheers the athletes got at the Vartan Gregorian Elementary School at Fox Point may be the sweetest. One, chanted by the students in Mrs. Teixeira's resource class, goes like this: Water polo water polo/You're our team/You stay drug free/And so do we/Heroes, heroes come from Brown/The best school in all the town. The cheering took place Oct. 30 to kick off Brown Athletics'12th year of partnership with the elementary school.
GSJ Story   27GSJ11d    11/08/2002   Montgomery
Drug company gifts: marketing technique poses ethical questions for some
Research has shown that accepting gifts and hospitality from pharmaceutical companies affects prescribing patterns to benefit drug companies, often to the detriment of the patient. To fourth-year medical student Jaya Agarwal, drug company marketing is "bribery" and " bad medicine." She would like to see the school adopt an across-the-board ban of industry gifts.
GSJ Story   27GSJ11e    11/08/2002   Turner
Off Hours: Christopher Bizzaco '03.5, campaign manager
Christopher Bizzacco '03.5, a political science and public policy major, took a leave of absence last September to accept the position of campaign manager for David Cicilline '83, the Democratic candidate for mayor of Providence.
GSJ Story   27GSJ11h    11/08/2002   Montgomery

Student Security and Safewalk. Thanks to Bratton report, these student-run groups received money to implement changes that they came up with themselves. They're a dedicated bunch. What drives their interest in students safety? Why drive a van around?
GSJ Story   27GSJ11i    11/08/2002   Sweeney
"The Green Bird" opens Nov. 7
Brown University Theatre will present Carlo Gozzi's "The Green Bird" Nov. 7-10 and 14-17 in Leeds Theatre. Translated by Albert Bermel and Ted Emery, "The Green Bird" is a comedy about the rites of passage; a fable in which the supernatural, the demonic and the Machiavellian harmoniously intertwine in a land where apples sing and statues speak.
GSJ Story   27GSJ10b    11/01/2002   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Wendy Schiller on midterm elections
On Tuesday, Nov. 5, voters will head to the polls. The George Street Journal's Kristen Cole spoke with Wendy J. Schiller, associate professor of political science and public policy, about what is at stake on Election Day.
GSJ Story   27GSJ10c    11/01/2002   Cole
Debris on Mars hints that it once had "cold-based" glaciers like those at Earth's poles
Professor Jim Head presents research suggesting something new about Mars: The equally spaced bands of rocks and similar debris found across the Martian equator are signs of former "cold-based glaciers." On Earth, cold-based glaciers occur near the poles.
GSJ Story   27GSJ10d    11/01/2002   Turner
Conference scholars to consider mysteries of Qumran Nov. 17-19
Brown's Center for Old World Archaeology and Art will host "Qumran: The Site of the Dead Sea Scrolls" on Nov. 17-19, 2002. This is the first international conference on the Qumran, and it will bring together some of the world's leading archaeological scholars to consider the many unanswered questions about the settlement.
News Release   02-031    10/29/2002   Curtis
Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. to speak on education as a human right Nov. 11
U.S. Rep. Jesse L. Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) will speak on "Education as a Human Right" at 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11, 2002, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This John Hazen White Lecture, sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions, is free and open to the public.
News Release   02-030    10/28/2002   Curtis
Determination, inspiration, guidance: sophomores' tools for selecting a major
how sophomores go about declaring a major; the advising process that leads to this declaration; etc. Will interview three (or so) students and their advisors about how each approaches what can be a very hard decision
GSJ Story   27GSJ09c    10/25/2002   Howell
Inquiring Minds: Col. Verrecchia on campus safety initiatives
Last spring, the University hired The Bratton Group, an international security consulting firm, to gather information about campus safety and to make recommendations for improvements. The group made a number of recommendations. The George Street Journal recently asked Col. Paul Verrecchia, head of Brown's Department of Public Safety, about them.
GSJ Story   27GSJ09e    10/25/2002   Sweeney
From the Faculty Bookshelf: Celebrity Politics
As we head into mid-term elections, Professor of Political Science Darrell West examines how celebrities are influencing the American political process both as candidates and lobbyists.
GSJ Story   27GSJ09f    10/25/2002   Curtis
Visiting scholars to consider mysteries of Qumran
Brown's Center for Old World Archaeology and Art will host a major conference next month when archaeologist Katharina Galor gathers her international colleagues to discuss the mysteries of Qumran – the site where the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered a half-century ago.
GSJ Story   27GSJ09g    10/25/2002   Curtis
Bell Gallery to host Italian artists
The Bell Gallery will host "Toward Uncertainty," a new exhibition featuring some of the best established and emerging artists of Italy. The exhibit opens Nov. 9 and continues through Dec. 29.
GSJ Story   27GSJ09h    10/25/2002   Curtis
Uhry brings 'Edgardo' to stage
Award-winning playwright Alfred Uhry '58, the author of "Driving Miss Daisy," premieres his newest play at the Hartford Stage this week. Titled "Edgardo Mine," the play is based on Professor David Kertzer's book, "The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara."
GSJ Story   27GSJ09i    10/25/2002   Curtis
Voters want Harwood out as speaker, are divided about military in Iraq
A survey of 418 statewide voters conducted Oct. 19-21, 2002, finds a majority of voters want John Harwood to step down as speaker. The survey also finds Democrat Myrth York leading Republican Don Carcieri in the race for governor. A majority of voters feel the state is headed in the wrong direction.
News Release   02-028    10/22/2002   Nickel
On the 40th anniversary, George Bush hijacks the Cuban Missile Crisis
If the historical John F. Kennedy had done in October 1962 what the Bush administration says he did -- asserting a doctrine of "preemptive defense" -- the likely outcome would have been a nuclear holocaust. The historical evidence, write James G. Blight and janet M. Lang, is now unambiguous.
News Release   02-027    10/21/2002   Nickel
Stars aligned for ethnic studies center, says Hu-DeHart
Evelyn Hu-DeHart, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, believes the program is on the verge of national distinction. "We want to work across disciplines as they re-examine and broaden their curriculum," she says. "My hope is to involve all departments and to build an excellent, credible ethnic studies concentration. I hope not to proceed as one lonely, separate unit, but to build bridges and alliances [across departments] so we can share and maximize our resources and energies."
GSJ Story   27GSJ08b    10/18/2002   Curtis
Research notes
Education reform by district; minorities in Providence; global e-government
GSJ Story   27GSJ08c    10/18/2002   Cole
Middle Eastern students bear witness to conflict
Brown students who grew up in Palestine, Israel, Jordan and Syria are working with Brown graduate student Michael Burch to help educate high school seniors at Rocky Hill School about life in the Mideast and issues that have cost the lives of some of their friends.
GSJ Story   27GSJ08d    10/18/2002   Cole
Hospital's simulation center trains medical staff to prevent ER errors
A computer-controlled, anatomically correct rubberized mannequin is the centerpiece of the new Rhode Island Hospital Simulation Center. The state-of-the-art facility hopes to help medical professionals and those still in training learn to minimize the possibilities of medical error.
GSJ Story   27GSJ08e    10/18/2002   Turner
Teens who witness domestic violence are more likely to engage in risky sex
Witnessing violence between parents has the same detrimental effect on teen-age girls as being a victim of abuse themselves, according to a new study by Brown sociologists: The teen-agers are more likely to engage in risky sex.
GSJ Story   27GSJ08f    10/18/2002   Cole
Peers appear to be a big factor in teen-age smoking
A study by five Brown investigators shows that teens with at least two friends who smoke are six times more likely to become regular cigarette users compared to those whose circle of friends does not include smokers.
GSJ Story   27GSJ08g    10/18/2002   Turner
Bell Gallery to present work of award-winning Italian artists
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present works by two masters of modern Italian art, along with the prize-winning work of five emerging Italian artists, in the exhibition Toward Uncertainty, opening Nov. 9 and continuing through Dec. 29, 2002. An opening reception for the artists is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, 2002.
News Release   02-024    10/17/2002   Curtis
Teens who witness or experience violence at home take risks with sex
Teen-age girls are three times more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior if they live in a family afflicted by physical violence -- whether they are victims of abuse or witness it between parents, according to a new study by Brown sociologists.
News Release   02-025    10/16/2002   Cole
Van Dam aims for impact: top faculty grad students, research awards, visibility
Andries van Dam, the Thomas J. Watson Jr. University Professor of Technology and Education and professor of computer science at Brown and the new vice president for research, discusses the process that led to his taking the job, and the vision he has for research at Brown.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07a    10/11/2002   Nickel
Sponsored funding rises 13 percent to $115 million
For the fifth year in a row, external funding rose significantly. When the books closed last June 30, grants awarded to campus faculty had topped $115 million, up 13 percent over the previous fiscal year and $49 million more than the $66 million in external funding received in fiscal year 1997-98. The majority of outside grants to Brown support research in the sciences, social sciences, and medicine.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07b    10/11/2002   Turner
Negotiations: the price for private funding
Brown pays a price for financial support from private foundations and nonprofit agencies. In the last few years, such funds have arrived packaged in restrictive terms and conditions on patents, inventions and other intellectual property.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07c    10/11/2002   Turner
The sleepyheads of summer
One of the more intensive investigational enterprises at Brown is the Sleep Research Lab's academic-research summer apprenticeship. This three-month program unites Brown students with others from universities around the world to receive instruction in human sleep and circadian rhythms and learn firsthand the techniques of behavioral sciences research.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07d    10/11/2002   Turner
For East Asian Studies, a wish list fulfilled
The East Asian Studies Department received a four-year $1,995,775 grant from the Freeman Foundation. Much of the grant will be spent on the University's East Asian collection – mostly Chinese and Japanese vernacular material. The size of the grant is a rarity in the humanities.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07f    10/11/2002   Curtis
Where are they now? Cedric Jennings '99
After graduating from Brown nearly four years ago, Cedric Jennings, featured in the best-selling book "Hope in the Unseen," spent two years working in the private sector before returning to school. He also speaks around the country about his odyssey from a Washington, D.C., ghetto to Brown.
GSJ Story   27GSJ07i    10/11/2002   Cole
Former U.S. ambassador to Nigeria receives top alumni award
The Brown Alumni Association presented its highest honor, the William Rogers Award, to William H. Twaddell '63, U.S. ambassador to Nigeria from 1997 to 2001, during the 19th annual Alumni Recognition Ceremony Saturday, Sept. 28, 2002.
News Release   02-023    10/04/2002   Curtis
From the Faculty Bookshelf: "Insurgent Images"
"Insurgent Images: The Agitprop Murals of Mike Alewitz" is a new book co-written by the artist and American civilization Lecturer Paul Buhle. Alewitz has used his art to lobby for pro-labor causes. Buhle, who has had a long involvement with the labor movement, met Alewitz several years ago when both became active with Scholars, Artists and Writers for Social Justice. "I was charmed by his effusive character and sense of humor, and I was overwhelmed by the strength and nondidactic character of his work," said Buhle. "It teaches you, but it doesn't hit you over the head."
GSJ Story   27GSJ06b    10/04/2002   Curtis
Road scholars
For the students of Brown's Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (FSAE) racecar design team, a journey that begins each September ends, if only temporarily, in May at the annual FSAE design competition in Pontiac, Mich. This past May, Brown's FSAE team finished 10th among an international field of more than 130 collegiate teams, ahead of formidable engineering schools Rochester Institute of Technology, North Carolina State University, and University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign.
GSJ Story   27GSJ06c    10/04/2002   Howell
"Hot Comb" takes its cue from African-American entrepreneur
"An independent woman is what I planned for me, to be as free and safe as I could be," says the character Madam Dessaline in "Hot Comb," a new musical drama which Rites and Reason Theatre presents Oct. 3-6 and 10-13 at Churchill House.
GSJ Story   27GSJ06d    10/04/2002   Howell
Brown takes first steps toward integrating data systems
The University has embarked upon a selection of an enterprise system that has the potential to affect Brown's business practices in the coming decade. Oracle, Peoplesoft and SCT/Banner will demonstrate enterprise systems beginning Oct. 28.
GSJ Story   27GSJ06f    10/04/2002   Sweeney
Simmons briefs staff about long-term planning
In a noontime forum attended by hundreds of staff members, President Simmons outlined a variety of steps her administration is taking to ensure Brown's position among the top research institutions in the coming decade. Her remarks included information about campus expansion, safety, and diversity.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05a    09/27/2002   Sweeney
Putting down roots: Immigrants tend to settle within existing segregated areas
Immigrants arriving in the nation's cities are not changing the existing, somewhat segregated, neighborhoods in which people of different races and ethnicities reside, according to a new study by Brown sociologists.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05c    09/27/2002   Cole
Inquiring Minds: Paul Kellstedt on presidents and the economy
Do voters blame stagnant wages, rising unemployment and accounting scandals on President Bush? Kristen Cole asked Paul Kellstedt, assistant professor of political science and public policy, how voters form conclusions about a president's ability to manage the economy and how much power a president has to influence those opinions.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05d    09/27/2002   Cole
Researchers discover substance in brain that acts like chemical that gives chilies fire
An international group of researchers led by a Brown graduate student recently identified a substance in the brain similar in structure and function to the active ingredient in hot chili peppers. Although they do not yet know exactly what drives the body's production of the compound, researchers think its release in tissues would likely cause burning pain, much like the sensation caused by the chemical capsaicin in chili peppers.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05e    09/27/2002   Cole
Student shows influence on Native American art
Sunil Kapila '03 was pleased when he received an UTRA grant to travel to New Mexico to study the influence of white culture on Native American art this past summer, but not all of the lessons he learned were quite what he expected.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05f    09/27/2002   Curtis
Contagion and controversy
A new exhibition at the John Carter Brown Library and a newly published essay by Stanley Aronson, M.D., examine the history of smallpox in America – and the pain and controversy it generated.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05g    09/27/2002   Curtis
From classroom to stage: Making it real
As Brown Theatre gets ready to present Chekhov's "The Seagull," Professor Lowry Marshall teaches a new crop of young actors the basic skills they must bring to the stage.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05h    09/27/2002   Curtis
Diagnostic imaging at center of lung screening trial
A host of Brown faculty and staff are involved in a new national trial to evaluate the effectiveness of using diagnostic imaging to prevent lung cancer deaths. The researchers helped assemble the study, and they will help conduct it.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05j    09/27/2002   Turner
Activist/author Derrick Bell to speak Sept. 28
Harvard professor and prominent African-American attorney/ethics expert Derek Bell will speak on ethics and ambition Sept. 28 in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
GSJ Story   27GSJ05k    09/27/2002   Howell
Voters favor Cicilline as mayor; minorities feel they have too little power
A survey of 688 Providence voters conducted Sept. 14–22, 2002, finds a big margin for David Cicilline over his general election rivals. Minorities feel they have too little political power in Providence.
News Release   02-020    09/24/2002   Nickel
City government Web sites improve but rely more heavily on user fees
Brown University's second annual analysis of government agency Web sites in America's 70 largest cities shows that cities have made dramatic improvements over last year. De-spite improvements in online services, however, cities are relying to a greater extent on revenue-generating Web user fees and premium services.
News Release   02-018    09/23/2002   Nickel
Op-Ed: Specialists on Iran-Iraq region see U.S. action in Iraq as a mistake
U.S. interventions in Afghanistan and its contemplated interventions in Iraq will demand a depth of non-military historical, social and political expertise that the United States currently does not have. The author reports from an international conference in Tajikistan.
News Release   02-021    09/23/2002   Nickel
Op-Ed: False-conviction chic in the Berkshires
Robert Halsey was convicted in 1993 of sexually abusing two boys on his school van route in Lanesboro, Mass. There was a mountain of evidence against him, and he was sentenced to two consecutive life terms. Now a growing movement is trying to suggest that Halsey was unjustly convicted. A country that cherishes the presumption of innocence still needs to learn something about the presumption of guilt.
News Release   02-009    09/20/2002   Nickel
Where are they now: Jonathan Mooney '00
A few months after Jonathan Mooney collected his Brown diploma in 2000, he purchased a bus ticket to tour the country and talk to people. Mooney's book with classmate David Cole, "Learning Outside the Lines," had just been published. The book chronicled the friends' experiences as learning-disabled students. Now Mooney, 25, travels around the world speaking to students with disabilities about celebrating their differences, and students in medical school about caring for patients with disabilities.
GSJ Story   27GSJ04a    09/20/2002   Cole
Faces of Brown: Emil Fioravanti
"Making the community safe." "Working in partnership with the community." Capt. Emil Fioravanti uses such phrases repeatedly in describing his objectives as the new second-in-command of Brown's Department of Public Safety. Hired this past August, Fioravanti will be heavily involved in implementing the recommendations made by the Bratton Group.
GSJ Story   27GSJ04c    09/20/2002   Sweeney
Brown students to perform in city opera's "Cinderella"
David T. Cohen '03 and Spyridon Antonopoulos '03 won't get to dance with Cinderella at the ball, but they will add valuable experience to their resume by performing in a fully staged opera production of the beloved fairy tale this weekend.
GSJ Story   27GSJ04d    09/20/2002   Curtis
John Carter Brown Library hosts exhibition on history of smallpox
The John Carter Brown Library will host the exhibition "Smallpox in the Americas, 1492 to 1815: Contagion and Controversy" through Jan. 15, 2003. The collection of books, pamphlets and broadsides has been developed in conjunction with the publication of an essay on the history of smallpox by Stanley Aronson, M.D., dean of medicine emeritus, and Lucile Newman, professor emerita of community health.
News Release   02-017    09/17/2002   Curtis
Governments improve Web security but offer more restricted areas
The third annual survey of state and federal "e-governments" conducted at Brown University shows that government Web sites have improved their security and privacy provisions over last year. However, there has been a proliferation of Internet services and Web sites that offer access only to registered users or in some cases only to users who pay fees. Top e-government states this year include Tennessee, New Jersey, California, Connecticut and Pennsylvania.
News Release   02-016    09/16/2002   Nickel
Andries van Dam named vice president for research
Andries van Dam, a computer graphics pioneer and member of the Brown faculty since 1965, has been appointed the University's first vice president for research. He will begin his work Oct. 1, 2002.
News Release   02-013    09/03/2002   Nickel
Voters favor York over Whitehouse and Pires, Brown over Inman
A survey of 437 likely Rhode Island Democratic primary voters conducted Aug. 31-Sept. 2, 2002, finds voters favor Myrth York over Sheldon Whitehouse and Antonio Pires in the race for governor. In the race for secretary of state, voters favor Matt Brown over incumbent Ed Inman, with more than half the voters undecided.
News Release   02-015    09/03/2002   Nickel
University will observe first anniversary of Sept. 11 attacks
The Brown University community will observe Sept. 11 with a variety of events commemorating the victims of last year's terrorist attacks and reflecting upon the lessons learned in the intervening months.
News Release   02-012    08/30/2002   Curtis
First-years choose among nearly two dozen new seminars just for them
Brown introduces a slate of small seminars for freshmen to give incoming students an immediate opportunity for an intimate learning experience and to avoid the danger that they will be swallowed up by large courses. The seminars are part of President Simmons' Initiatives for Academic Enrichment.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01a    08/30/2002   Cole
The advising partnership: Grant enables enhancements to advising system for first- and second-year students
Funds from a five-year $250,000 grant presented to Brown last year to examine and support the advising system have been directed at efforts surounding students' first two years at the University. The grant has made possible new written materials, a revamped Web site about advising, training and orientation sessions for all groups involved, and a new advising coordinator.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01b    08/30/2002   Cole
Med students travel to Caribbean on an AIDS/HIVeducation mission
With a mixed bag of talks, skits and small group chats, eight medical students and one newly fledged physician from Brown recently carried out a 12-day HIV/AIDS education mission to high school and college students across the Caribbean nation of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01c    08/30/2002   Turner
From the Faculty Bookshelf: "Scandal in a Small Town"
Anthropology Professor Marida Hollos sees eery similarities between Providence Mayor Vincent Cianci and the disgraced Hungarian mayor she chronicled in her latest book, "Scandal in a Small Town."
GSJ Story   27GSJ01f    08/30/2002   Curtis
Coover's class brings text to (virtual) life in the Cave
Adjunct Professor Robert Coover and his writing students are collaborating with artists and computer programmers to explore the new frontiers of literature – in 3-D.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01g    08/30/2002   Curtis
Schneider to help launch performance studies program
New faculty member Assistant Professor Rebecca Schneider brings her expertise in performance studies and feminist theater to Brown's graduate and undergraduate students this fall.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01j    08/30/2002   Curtis
Seven-year project will explore the biology of osteoarthritis
Brown researchers recently launched a seven-year project to help uncover the biological markers that predict who will develop the most common form of arthritis.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01k    08/30/2002   Turner
Fourth-quarter surge helps annual fund set records
A total of 22,665 donors raised more than $17 million for the Brown Annual Fund (BAF) this past fiscal year. Notable, too, was the surge of fourth-quarter giving. While the stock market experienced its worst turmoil in years, the BAF raised $8 million between April and June, $3.3 million in June alone.
GSJ Story   27GSJ01l    08/30/2002   Sweeney
Computer science pioneer Andries van Dam to deliver address Sept. 3
Andries van Dam, co-founder of Brown's Department of Computer Science, will deliver the Opening Convocation address Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2002, at 11 a.m. on The College Green. President Ruth J. Simmons will declare the 239th academic year officially open.
News Release   02-010    08/22/2002   Cole
Parenthood is an increasingly isolated job, Brown sociologists say
As the 20th century progressed, parents shouldered the care and financial burdens of raising children with less and less help, say Brown sociologists. Frances K. Goldscheider and colleagues analyzed census data from 1880 to 1990 and presented their findings at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association.
News Release   02-007    08/19/2002   Cole
Op-Ed: For peace in the Middle East: A two-state solution?
Palestinian Arabs often take the colonial experiences of Algeria and South Africa as models for their conflict with Zionism: As Europeans ultimately lost power in both Algeria and South Africa, perhaps Jewish settlers will not prove to be permanent, writes Herschel I. Grossman. But suppose that analogy is wrong. What if the situation is more like the example of Ireland, where a two-state solution has worked?
News Release   02-006    08/14/2002   Nickel
Without blue crabs, southern salt marshes wash away, study finds
Over-harvesting of blue crabs may be triggering the colossal die-off of salt marshes across the southeastern United States, suggests a new study by two Brown University biologists who report their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
News Release   02-005    08/05/2002   Turner
Bell Gallery exhibition of political artist Sue Coe to open September 7
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition, "Commitment to the Struggle: The Art of Sue Coe," Sept. 7 to Oct. 22, 2002, in the List Art Center. The show represents two decades of work by the political artist, who will discuss her work during an opening reception set for Friday, Sept. 13 at 5:30 p.m.
News Release   02-003    08/02/2002   Curtis
Hormone boon goes bust
Women across the country were shocked earlier this summer when a national long-term study on hormone replacement therapy revealed the treatment -- long believed to help aging women maintain good health -- actually increases their risk for several life-threatening diseases. The findings are bittersweet for the women participating in the Brown-led arm of the Women's Health Initiative.
GSJ Story   26GSJ32c    08/02/2002   Curtis
JCB Library hosts 'Errand into the Wilderness'
A new exhibition at the John Carter Brown Library recaptures in print the New England experience, body and spirit during the region's formative period. 'Errand into the Wilderness: The Early English Colonization of New England, 1602-1753' is on display in the library's MacMillan Reading Room through Aug. 31.
GSJ Story   26GSJ32d    08/02/2002   Curtis
It's now or never for greenhouse gas reductions, study's authors say
Begin to reduce greenhouse gas emissions soon or it might be too late to avoid dangerous climate change, say a Brown author and his Princeton colleague in a policy forum in the June 14 issue of Science. Their scientific analysis responds to calls for well-defined long-term objectives in dealing with climate change.
GSJ Story   26GSJ32f    08/02/2002   Turner
Research notes: dermatologists and sunscreen; aging baboons; couch potatoes
Study shows that dermatologists don't practice what they preach when it comes to using sunscreen; aging baboons provide insight into human lifespan; computerized calls fire up couch potatoes to exercise.
GSJ Story   26GSJ32h    08/02/2002   Turner
Op-Ed: Will education be the next security risk in the Occupied Territories?
The Israeli military raid on Al-Quds University in Jerusalem is ironic in light of the recent claim by the Israeli military that Palestinian textbooks incite students against the Israeli government. That claim, repeatedly debunked by U.S. academics, misses the point, writes Lara Harb. The occupation -- not to mention the ongoing attack on primary schools and universities -- provides a far more provocative education than anything a textbook could ever convey.
News Release   02-004    07/12/2002   Nickel
Inquiring Minds: Goldberger on college admission process
Inquiring Minds: Michael Goldberger on the college admission process
GSJ Story   26GSJ31a    07/12/2002   Cole
Hiring under way for 87 new courses, sections
When students arrive on campus for the start of the academic year, they will find new options both in living space and classroom study. Through a variety of measures, the University is adding nearly 200 beds to prepare for a larger-than-usual entering class (the yield for the class is 60 percent), and 87 courses or sections of courses to offer a wider range of academic choices for entering students.
GSJ Story   26GSJ31b    07/12/2002   Cole
At Brown
Memorial fund donation; obituary; awards and honors
GSJ Story   26GSJ31e    07/12/2002   
MOM - a mentoring program run by medical students
In the Medical Students Outreach to Mothers-to-Be program, known as the MOM program, medical students attend sessions on postpartum depression, breastfeeding, nutrition in pregnancy and the effects of alcohol and cigarette use, among other topics, and are paired with expectant mothers in need of social support -- some faced language barriers, others were single moms and others just needed help navigating through the medical establishment.
GSJ Story   26GSJ31h    07/12/2002   Bramson
Finding the cellular machine behind blood clotting
Three Brown scientists have described a critical blood-clotting role for a seven-protein complex found in animal and plant cells. Understanding this dynamic of cell biology could lead to better treatments for abnormal clotting, which is the chief cause of stroke.
GSJ Story   26GSJ31j    07/12/2002   Turner
R.I. high school students invited to explore "Culture and Mass Media"
Rhode Island high school students may enroll at a reduced rate in "Culture and Mass Media," a course offered through Brown University's Office of Summer Studies. The course, created by political scientist Darrell West and taught by Katherine Stewart, meets weekdays from July 22 through August 2.
News Release   02-001    07/01/2002   Sweeney
Feeding tubes may not help in severe dementia, yet use varies widely
Use of feeding tubes in nursing home patients with severe dementia is more than 10 times higher in some states than others despite evidence that it may not delay death or improve quality of life, according to a study by Brown University researchers in the June 26, 2002, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   01-155    06/25/2002   Turner
Op-Ed: World Cup heralds a new Korea
The Dutch football coach Guus Hiddink, hired two years ago to coach Korea's national team, brought with him a different set of values, including meritocracy and individual accountability. The success of those values has not gone unnoticed off the field, writes Herschel Grossman. Whatever the outcome of the World Cup, changes to Korean society are not likely to fade with the euphoria of soccer fans.
News Release   01-158    06/24/2002   Nickel
Spring sports wrapup
Spring sports wrapup. Women's crew wins NCAA championship; men's tennis wins Ivy championship; more
GSJ Story   26GSJ30b    06/21/2002   Montgomery
A smoke alarm for anthrax
A nationwide team of researchers led by Arto Nurmikko, professor of engineering and physics, recently received $8.4 million to create a compact warning system for airborne biological agents such as anthrax. The award comes from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
GSJ Story   26GSJ30e    06/21/2002   Turner
Bell Gallery showcases local artists
Providence artists Yizhak Elyashiv, David Newton and Judyth van Amringe are showcased in an exhibition at the Bell Gallery through July 7.
GSJ Story   26GSJ30f    06/21/2002   Curtis
At Brown for June 21, 2002
Besdine is named interim dean of medicine and biological sciences; new trustees named; bone marrow donor found; more
GSJ Story   26GSJ30g    06/21/2002   Nickel
J. Carter Brown's years of service enriched campus life at the University
J. Carter Brown, a former trustee of the University and board member of the John Carter Brown Library and the John Nicholas Brown Center for the Study of American Civilization, died Monday at age 67.
News Release   01-157    06/18/2002   Nickel
Op-Ed: Fighting pacifism
Decades ago, the Cold War and Vietnam came equipped with terms like "red" and "commie," words which drained enemies of their human complexity. Might the term "axis of evil" serve a similar purpose now? The author can't shake the feeling that we have passed this way before. This article was written originally for publication in the Friends Journal.
News Release   01-154    06/17/2002   Nickel
Most voters believe Cianci is guilty; few believe the jury will convict
A survey of 482 statewide voters conducted June 8-10, 2002, finds 67 percent of voters believe Mayor Vincent A. Cianci Jr. has provided strong leadership, 52 percent believe he is guilty of the federal charges he now faces and 15 percent believe the jury will convict him. The survey also finds Myrth York leading Sheldon Whitehouse and Antonio Pires in the race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.
News Release   01-153    06/11/2002   Nickel
Keynote offers preview of 'science-fiction future'
Professor Andries van Dam, the keynote speaker at Opening Convocation, presented his vision of what the future holds in a presentation titled "he Future Ain't What It Used to Be"
GSJ Story   27GSJ02a    06/09/2002   Sweeney
New faculty members learn the ropes from colleagues at orientation
Dealing with the academic characteristics that make Brown unique were among the topics of an orientation attended by 37 new faculty members. The orientation was sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and organized by the Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.
GSJ Story   27GSJ02b    06/09/2002   Cole
Physician dives into relatively uncharted waters of surfing research
Andrew Nathanson, M.D., a clinical assistant professor of medicine, has led the largest study of surfing injuries to date. "I think that surfing is quite a bit safer than people believe," he says, although there is room to improve the safety of equipment.
GSJ Story   27GSJ02d    06/09/2002   Turner
Bell Gallery exhibition features Providence artists' new work
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host an exhibition of new work by Providence artists Yizhak Elyashiv, David Newton and Judyth van Amringe, beginning June 8 and continuing through July 7, 2002, in the List Art Center. An opening reception is scheduled for Friday, June 7, 2002, from 5 to 7 p.m.
News Release   01-149    05/31/2002   Curtis
Modern Culture and Media to offer Ph.D. program
Building upon its reputation as a leader in its field, the Department of Modern Culture and Media will begin offering a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), a move that department faculty believe will lead to breakthrough work and innovation in their field.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29a    05/31/2002   Curtis
Fellowship will help Bartov explore Ukranian history
Professor Omer Bartov will use his Guggenheim Fellowship to explore Buczacz, the hometown of the only Hebrew author who has won the Nobel Prize for Literature, Shmuel Yosef Agnon; of the great Polish Jewish historian, Emanuel Ringelblum; of Sigmund Freud's parents; and of Bartov's own mother.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29b    05/31/2002   Bramson
2009 graduate from Brown with "gift of learning" at their sides
Brown awarded a total of 2,009 degrees during Commencement ceremonies held on Monday, May 27. Of those, 1,506 were undergraduate degrees, 280 were master's degrees, 75 were doctors of medicine, and 148 were doctors of philosophy. Commencement weekend offered a variety of speakers, from those who presented Commencement Forums May 25 to students addressing their classmates Memorial Day. Here are excerpts from many of those presentations.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29c    05/31/2002   
Three degrees of graduation
On Commencement Day, George Kaufman took the triple crown: a bachelor of arts, a bachelor of science and a master of science.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29d    05/31/2002   Cole
Biomedical engineering will offer graduate program
The Board of Fellows of the Brown Corporation approved a graduate program in biomedical engineering. Recently, President Simmons approved a Center for Biomedical Engineering. In addition, six seniors are the first to graduate with degrees in the new undergraduate biomedical engineering program.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29e    05/31/2002   Turner
That sounds about right
The sound that accompanies an onscreen image of feet sloshing through mud is an exaggeration of the true sound, but viewers don't mind. In fact, we may think it is more realistic that way. A new study by researcher Laurie Heller supports longtime claims by sound effect technicians, known as Foley artists, that exaggerating sounds in movies makes the sounds more believable to the audience.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29g    05/31/2002   Cole
Hands-on Haffenreffer
A wealth of resources awaits youngsters who travel to the Haffenreffer Museum in Bristol from throughout Southeastern New England.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29h    05/31/2002   Curtis
Research notes
Research notes on psychiatric patients after Sept. 11, hepatitis research; more
GSJ Story   26GSJ29j    05/31/2002   Turner
Researching school reform strategies
Brown's Advanced Studies Fellowship Program recently selected 10 scholars to research federal and national strategies of school reform in the United States. The postdoctoral fellows will receive funds for a nine-month leave to pursue their research, and they will participate in a three-year program of seminars, mentoring and group discussions at Brown.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29k    05/31/2002   Cole
Hunt for HIV vaccine is a community effort
Five years ago, President Clinton called for an HIV/AIDS vaccine within 10 years. If that goal is to be reached it will be because of the joint efforts of clinicians, researchers, community advisers and the people who volunteer for vaccine trials. Here are five stories that look at those efforts.
GSJ Story   26GSJ29l    05/31/2002   Turner
Students worry about nuclear proliferation, support international cooperation
High school students are concerned about the proliferation of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons; about damage to the global environment; and that more Americans will die at the hands of terrorists, according to a Brown University survey of 2,225 high school students. The survey of students involved with the University-sponsored Capitol Forum Program provides insight into what the next generation of voters believe is cause for concern on an international scale.
News Release   01-146    05/28/2002   Bramson
Besdine named interim dean of medicine and biological sciences
Richard W. Besdine, M.D., the David S. Greer Professor of Geriatric Medicine, has been named interim dean of medicine and biological sciences at Brown University. Besdine will begin his new duties July 1, 2002.
News Release   01-147    05/28/2002   Nickel
Pilot diversity program builds insight and understanding
80 freshmen and 30 upperclassmen participated in Building Understanding Across Differences, a collaboration offered by Student Life and the Dean of the College to increase understanding and dialogue among students of differing social identities related to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ability and class.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28a    05/24/2002   Curtis
Page Turners
Cristina Bonuso and Eric Mueller of the graduating Class of 2002
GSJ Story   26GSJ28h    05/24/2002   DeCesare
For a decade, Brown's Title IX news has followed Amy Cohen '92
This year marks the 30th anniversary of Title IX, the law that prohibits gender discrimination at educational institutions, and a decade since a group of Brown athletes turned to the justice system to uphold the statute they believed the University had violated. Cohen, now a public school teacher in New York City, is returning for her 10-year reunion. She reflects on the lawsuit that carries her name.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28l    05/24/2002   Cole
South Pacific ridge bears Brown's name
As with other scientific discoveries, if you're the first to discover or map a volcanic ridge, you get to name it. That's how the Brown Ridge in the South Pacific recently acquired its name. Last winter, researchers affiliated with Brown were the first to map the approximately 200-kilometer-long ridge that they've since named after the University.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28m    05/24/2002   Bramson
STG Faculty Grants Program
The Scholarly Technology Group is poised to help faculty members create an online literary journal, an electronic book to examine 1960s popular culture in West Germany and technology to allow more sophisticated research of South Asian manuscripts. These and other projects have been selected for the second annual round of STG's Faculty Grants Program.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28n    05/24/2002   Bramson
Political turmoil postpones environmental exchange program
Deborah Lapidus '05 and Bekah Rottenberg '03 both planned to conduct research this summer in Nepal with a Nepalese scholar who spent this past semester at Brown in the Watson Institute's International Scholars of the Environment Program. However, due to internal conflict in Nepal just weeks before they were set to travel, the undergraduates' trips are being postponed until next summer.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28o    05/24/2002   Bramson
Sock and Buskin celebrate a century at Brown
The year-long celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Sock and Buskin stages its grand finale during Commencement weekend with a full slate of events offered by the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance and its alumni.
GSJ Story   26GSJ28p    05/24/2002   Curtis
Some sound effects are better than the real thing, says Brown study
New scientific evidence supports long-time claims by sound effect technicians, known as Foley artists, that exaggerating sounds in movies makes them more believable to the audience. Laurie Heller, assistant professor (research) of psychology, will present her findings June 3, 2002, at the 143rd meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, in Pittsburgh, Pa.
News Release   01-145    05/23/2002   Cole
Brown will award eight honorary degrees at Commencement May 27
Brown University presented eight honorary degrees during Commencement ceremonies today, Monday, May 27. The recipients were John Birkelund, Raymond G. Chambers, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Paul LeClerc, Emily Arnold McCully, Jessye Norman, Sadako Ogata and William Warner.
News Release   01-143    05/22/2002   Sweeney
Terror aftermath tough on psychiatric patients, study shows
Findings from a post-Sept. 11, 2001, study by Brown University researchers support the idea that psychiatric patients are at increased risk for experiencing distressing symptoms following national terrorist attacks. The results will be presented May 20, 2002, during the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in Philadelphia.
News Release   01-138    05/20/2002   Turner
Howard Foundation awards 12 fellowships for 2002-2003
The George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation, administered by Brown University, has named 12 recipients of $20,000 fellowships for the 2002-2003 academic year in the areas of music, musicology, playwriting and theater arts.
News Release   01-140    05/14/2002   
Marian Wright Edelman to speak at Medical School Convocation
Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund, will speak at the Brown Medical School Commencement Convocation Monday, May 27, in the First Unitarian Church of Providence. Medical graduates will also hear talks by James McIlwain, M.D., the Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, and Robert Wolf, a member of the graduating class. The convocation will begin at 8:45 a.m.
News Release   01-141    05/14/2002   Turner
Ruth Bader Ginsburg to deliver baccalaureate address May 26
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will address graduating seniors at Brown's baccalaureate service on Sunday, May 26, 2002, at 1:30 p.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   01-142    05/14/2002   Bramson
Graduate School will honor distinguished alumni, teaching assistants
During Commencement ceremonies on Monday, May 27, the University's Graduate School will present its Distinguished Graduate School Alumnus/a Award and the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching.
News Release   01-137    05/10/2002   Sweeney
Upholding Brown tradition, two seniors will address graduating class
Maithili Parekh of Bombay, India, and Edward Smith of Washington, D.C., will deliver orations during Brown's 234th Commencement, Monday, May 27, 2002, at 10:15 a.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   01-135    05/07/2002   Cole
Computing plan begins with network upgrades this summer
As early as this fall, the Brown community will see changes in its computing environment. ACUP members heard about some of the changes from Ellen Waite-Franzen, vice president of Computing and Information Services. She outlined a plan that will begin to address many of Brown's urgent computing needs, particularly those that support the Initiatives for Academic Enrichment.
GSJ Story   26GSJ27b    05/03/2002   Sweeney
Marsh reflects on decade at help of Medical School
After nearly 10 years as Brown's chief medical education officer, Donald J. Marsh, M.D., will begin a year-long sabbatical July 1 after which he will retire as dean of medicine and biological sciences emeritus.
GSJ Story   26GSJ27d    05/03/2002   Turner
Faculty, staff invited to personal safety workshop
Police and Security is sponsoring a personal safety workshop for faculty and staff on May 6.
GSJ Story   26GSJ27f    05/03/2002   Cole
Gift endows artist-in-residence program
Thanks to a $1-million gift from an alumna, Brown's arts departments will have the means to bring distinguished visiting artists to campus beginning in September.
GSJ Story   26GSJ27h    05/03/2002   Curtis
Lawton Wehle Fitt '74 endows an artists-in-residence program
Lawton Wehle Fitt '74 has given $1 million to Brown University to establish and endow an artists-in-residence program. The endowment will help bring distinguished artists in the fields of creative writing, dance, digital media, film, fine art, music, theater and visual arts to the University each semester.
News Release   01-131    05/02/2002   Curtis
Marsh to step down as dean of medicine and biological sciences
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons has announced that Donald J. Marsh, M.D., will step down as dean of medicine and biological sciences. Marsh will begin a year-long sabbatical July 1, after which he will retire as dean emeritus, effective July 1, 2003.
News Release   01-127    04/26/2002   Turner
Chris Tucker talks to theater class
Like a persistent tickle in your side, "Rush Hour" star Chris Tucker kept his audience of faculty, staff and students laughing throughout his brief visit to campus. Be true to yourself and treasure your education: Those were the themes Tucker expressed when he visited Professor Lowry Marshall's theater arts class.
GSJ Story   26GSJ26a    04/26/2002   Mongtomery
Tennis team wins its first Ivy championship
The Brown men's tennis team dismissed Harvard 4-3 in a fight to the end as the two squads struggled to hold on to their undefeated Ivy League records. The April 21 win gave the Bears their first-ever Ivy League tennis title and snagged their first NCAA invite in the process.
GSJ Story   26GSJ26b    04/26/2002   Montgomery
GM gives Brown patent to new technology
Associate professor of engineering Gregory Crawford is poised to lead a research team seeking to develop ways to produce more cost-effective screen displays. The research team hopes to improve display technology developed by General Motors and Delphi, which have donated their patents for multi-color display technology to Brown.
GSJ Story   26GSJ26c    04/26/2002   Bramson
ACUP meeting on capital improvements
Capital improvements, particularly those that support President Simmons' Initiatives for Academic Enrichment, were discussed by the Advisory Committee on University Planning at its April 22 meeting.
GSJ Story   26GSJ26e    04/26/2002   Sweeney
Op-Ed: PBS Frontline embraces a child molester
PBS Frontline's "Did Daddy Do It?" purports to be a documentary about an unjustly convicted child molester. Frontline, however, appears to have dismissed important evidence and credible arguments on its way to embracing a man convicted of horrendous sex crimes against numerous children, including his own son, writes Ross Cheit.
News Release   01-119    04/25/2002   Nickel
Girls focus on interactive projects; parents get practical school advice
The "Empowering Your Future"conference at Brown University on Saturday, April 27, provides hands-on science and engineering experience for middle-school girls and their parents and teachers. The event is open to the media.
News Release   01-125    04/24/2002   Bramson
Op-Ed: French insecurity and the presidential elections
The Far Rights first-round success in French presidential elections and a recent conservative victory in Germany are indications of rising insecurity in Europe, writer Hilary Silver. Given the weakness of the European Parliament, national elections serve as the main outlets for sentiments of malaise, mistrust or misery.
News Release   01-126    04/24/2002   Nickel
Trombonist George Masso and Brown Jazz Band to perform April 27
Trombonist and Rhode Island native George Masso will perform with the Brown Jazz Band in the 15th annual Eric Adam Brudner '84 Memorial Concert Saturday, April 27, 2002, at 8 p.m. in the Richard and Edna Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   01-123    04/23/2002   Curtis
NPR's Sylvia Poggioli to receive Welles Hangen Award May 3
Sylvia Poggioli, senior European correspondent for National Public Radio, will receive the Welles Hangen Award for Superior Achievement in Journalism on Friday, May 3, 2002, at 4 p.m. in Sayles Hall on The College Green. Poggioli will speak on "Terrorism, Wars and the Trans-Atlantic Relationship."
News Release   01-124    04/23/2002   Curtis
Parental contributions to education boost students' ability to spend
Every dollar parents contributed toward law school expenses increased their offspring's lifetime consumption by $1.76, says an economist at Brown University.
News Release   01-120    04/19/2002   Cole
Two Brown faculty members receive Wriston Fellowships
Assistant Professor of Modern Culture and Media Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature Elliott Colla have been awarded Wriston Fellowships, one of the highest awards Brown bestows upon its teaching faculty.
News Release   01-121    04/19/2002   Curtis
Conference to examine relationship between Portugal and Africa
International scholars, authors, artists and diplomats will convene at Brown University April 25-28, 2002, for a literary symposium, ambassadors roundtable, social sciences conference, art exhibition and film series all devoted to the historical and contemporary relationship between Portugal and Africa.
News Release   01-122    04/19/2002   Bramson
P.O.W. experience captured in John Hay exhibit
The John Hay Library's latest exhibit, "POW: The Prisoner of War Experience," is a collection of sketches, watercolors, memoirs and diaries from soldiers captured and held by enemy forces from the Civil War to Operation Desert Storm.
GSJ Story   26GSJ25a    04/19/2002   Curtis
Environmental scientist's collaborations win notice from EPA
A realization nearly a decade ago by Steven Hamburg about his climate-change research has led to an altered environmental education landscape in New England. His work has been recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He's one of about a dozen individuals who have won the EPA's Region I Environmental Merit Awards this year.
GSJ Story   26GSJ25b    04/19/2002   Bramson
Medical researcher mentors high school teacher
Theodore Johnson of Feinstein High School worked in the labs of Brown's Sharon Rounds for eight weeks last summer through Frontiers in Physiology, a program of the American Physiological Society (APS). This program provides fellowships to help teachers delve into laboratory science.
GSJ Story   26GSJ25c    04/19/2002   Turner
WTC work was emotional for psychologists specializing in disaster
Visiting professors Vitali Skriptchenko and Anahit Azarian, who are affiliated with Brown's Center for the Study of Human Development, spent 11 days in New York City interviewing victims of the World Trade Center attack. They recently talked about their psychological observations as part of the center's colloquium series.
GSJ Story   26GSJ25d    04/19/2002   Cole
Inquiring Minds: Patricia Risica on schools' anti-obesity campaign
Parents of students in some schools in Pennsylvania and Florida received letters this year notifying them that their children are overweight and encouraging them to change their children's eating habits and help them get more exercise. Patricia Risica, assistant professor (research) of community health, comments.
GSJ Story   26GSJ25e    04/19/2002   Cole
At Brown for April 19
Awards and honors for April 19
GSJ Story   26GSJ25h    04/19/2002   
Evelyn Hu-DeHart named director of Center for Race and Ethnicity
Evelyn Hu-DeHart, currently professor and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado–Boulder, has been named professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. Hu-DeHart will begin her duties July 1, 2002.
News Release   01-115    04/12/2002   Nickel
Bush must overcome hesitations and commit troops to Middle East
The only hope of breaking the Israeli-Palestinian deadlock lies in outside intervention. Whereas many nations may influence Palestinian actions, the United States is the only nation with any leverage over Israel. This makes some form of American intervention in the Palestinian conflict inevitable, despite substantial domestic political risk.
News Release   01-118    04/12/2002   Nickel
Would cloning necessarily undermine human potential and sense of self?
In the April 12 issue of Science, Brown University philosopher Dan W. Brock argues human cloning should not undermine our sense of self. Although genetically identical, clones would not have the same traits, character, decisions and life history.
News Release   01-116    04/11/2002   Cole
Jarat Chopra available for interviews Friday, April 12, at 11 a.m.
Jarat Chopra, assistant professor (research) at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies, will recount his recent experiences during the siege of Ramallah and make himself available for interviews at 11 a.m. Friday, April 12, 2002, in Maddock Alumni Center on the Brown campus.
News Release   01-117    04/11/2002   Nickel
Jarat Chopra, now in Jerusalem, will speak with press at 4:15 p.m.
Jarat Chopra, a Brown University assistant professor (research) who was among international observers trapped in Ramallah by Israeli forces, has made his way to Jerusalem. Chopra will be available by phone to reporters at 4:15 p.m. today (Monday, April 8) in the Watson Institute for International Studies on the Brown campus.
News Release   01-114    04/08/2002   Nickel
Atrocious Reports and Reporting Atrocities
As long as the Israeli military closes off its military operations to news coverage, writes Elliott Colla in an op-ed, we have the moral duty to take seriously reports of atrocities that arrive via other media each day.
News Release   01-112    04/05/2002   Nickel
Applications available for Brown Summer High School
Brown Summer High School, which runs July 8-26 this year, offers students entering grades 9 through 12 the opportunity to work in small groups, participate in discussions, conduct laboratory experiments, and engage in numerous hands-on activities in the areas of social studies, biology, and English. The cost is $100; a limited amount of financial aid is available.
News Release   01-113    04/05/2002   Sweeney
Educational Diversity and Excellence at Brown April 12-13
Educational Diversity and Excellence at Brown is the topic of a retreat April 12-13 sponsored by President Simmons.
GSJ Story   26GSJ23b    04/05/2002   Sweeney
Enhancing first-year experience is one motive behind work-study change
The Initiatives for Academic Enrichment include replacing work-study money with grant money for first-year students in the hope that freshman-year experience will be the same for students on financial aid as it is for those who don't have to work 10-15 hours a week.
GSJ Story   26GSJ23c    04/05/2002   Bramson
Inquiring Minds: Lewis Gordon on minorities and the film industry
Professor of Africana Studies Lewis Gordon discusses the treatment of minorities in the film industry.
GSJ Story   26GSJ23d    04/05/2002   Curtis
At Brown for April 5
At Brown for April 5: Library Users Survey; awards and honors
GSJ Story   26GSJ23f    04/05/2002   
Cokie Roberts to deliver second annual Casey Shearer Lecture April 11
ABC News chief congressional analyst Cokie Roberts, co-anchor of "This Week With Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts," will give the second annual Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture on Thursday, April 11, 2002, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The lecture series honors the memory of Casey Shearer '00, who died just days before he was to graduate from Brown.
News Release   01-111    04/01/2002   Curtis
New resource will make online information more accessible to disabled
During Disability Awareness Day, organizers will announce a service that makes the Brown Web site more accessible for people with disabilities. Betsie, as the service is known, will be up and running on Brown's Web site by April 10. It transforms Web pages so their information is easier to access.
GSJ Story   26GSJ22e    03/29/2002   Bramson
Students with disabilities hope April 10 event will promote change
Brown students who hope to enlighten their peers, their professors and administrators about what they and others with disabilities face at Brown sponsor Disability Awareness Day April 10.
GSJ Story   26GSJ22g    03/29/2002   Bramson
Inquiring Minds: Janet Cooper-Nelson on pedophilia and the clergy
Inquiring Minds: University Chaplain Janet Cooper-Nelson discusses the controversy concerning recent revelations that church leaders sexually abused children.
GSJ Story   26GSJ22i    03/29/2002   Curtis
Third-graders better equipped to handle stress if early to bed, study says
Measuring the hormone cortisol, blood pressure and perceptions of events, researchers at Brown University found that third-grade girls who went to bed before 9 p.m. showed more adaptive responses to stress than those who stayed up later. The study included 138 girls in New York City.
News Release   01-109    03/28/2002   Cole
Israeli and Palestinian leaders to discuss possibilities for ending conflict
Yasser Abed Rabbo, the Palestinian minister of culture and information, and Yossi Beilin, the former Israeli minister of justice, have embarked on a new peace initiative that includes joint publications and a speaking tour in the United States. They will finish their U.S. speaking tour with a panel discussion at Brown University on April 11.
News Release   01-107    03/27/2002   Bramson
Bioterrorism specialist Margaret Hamburg to speak at Brown April 11
On Thursday, April 11, 2002, at 4 p.m. Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., will deliver a lecture titled "Bioterrorism: Ready or Not," in Sayles Hall, located on The College Green at Brown University. Her presentation, the third annual Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes Jr. Lectureship in Public Health, will be free and open to the public.
News Release   01-108    03/27/2002   Turner
Tom Wolfe to open 22nd annual Brown/Providence Journal conference
Author Tom Wolfe will headline "The City: No Limits," the 22nd annual Brown University/Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, April 14-19, 2002. He will deliver the keynote address, titled "Cities of Ambition," on Sunday, April 14, at 4 p.m. in the Richard and Edna Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   01-105    03/26/2002   Curtis
Floyd Abrams to speak on First Amendment and terrorism April 9
Civil rights attorney Floyd Abrams will give the 36th annual Alexander Meiklejohn Lecture on Tuesday, April 9, 2002, at 7:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall. He will speak on "The First Amendment and the War on Terrorism." The public is welcome.
News Release   01-106    03/26/2002   Curtis
Author Andrew Solomon to speak April 3 on depression
Andrew Solomon, author of the award-winning The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, will give the 10th annual Harriet W. Sheridan Literature and Medicine Lecture on Wednesday, April 3, 2002, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching on The College Green. This event, which is dedicated to Drs. Stanley and Betty Aronson, is free and open to the public.
News Release   01-103    03/21/2002   Curtis
Op-Ed: Minds don't snap
When tragic, unbelievable behaviors seem to emerge suddenly from nowhere, they are invariably preceded by a process that was under way for years, writes Lewis Lipsitt. If we could learn how human experiences work to erode an individual's stability, we could become sensitive to imminent disasters and intervene to prevent them. But if we go on believing that "crazy behaviors" are happenstances, we will never get to their roots.
News Release   01-100    03/19/2002   Nickel
Op-Ed: Censorship and violence in the Middle East
A hard look at what Israeli military censors cut from news articles before their publication reveals a pattern, writes Elliott Colla. The censors sought to stifle the notion that the death of Palestinians might have a pattern. Incidents of violence against Palestinians could only be reported as isolated occurrences.
News Release   01-101    03/19/2002   Nickel
Exploring the artistic side of medicine
Twenty first-year medical students are exploring the intersections of art, science, health and medicine this semester in a new elective course, "Art and the Human Body," created by one of their peers.
GSJ Story   26GSJ21c    03/15/2002   Sweeney
Research grants to Bio-Med top $105 million
Research grants awarded to Division of Biology and Medicine faculty topped $100 million recently for the first time during a fiscal year.
GSJ Story   26GSJ21h    03/15/2002   Turner
Campus Compact teaches service learning to K-12 educators
Campus Compact program trains RI teachers in K-12 how to incorporate service learning into curriculum.
GSJ Story   26GSJ21k    03/15/2002   Cole
Bell Gallery to exhibit 40 years of work by Malangatana
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present Malangatana: A 40-Year Survey of a Contem-porary Mozambican Artist April 13 through May 27, 2002. A reception for the artist is scheduled for Saturday, April 27 at 7 p.m. at the gallery in the List Art Center.
News Release   01-099    03/13/2002   Curtis
Brown commissions Bratton Group to lead campus security study
Brown University has commissioned a team of security consultants from the Bratton Group to study campus safety and security and to make recommendations for improve-ments. The work will begin March 11, with the final report due by the end of May.
News Release   01-097    03/11/2002   Nickel
They think, therefore they video
Lifelong friends and seniors Eli Batalion and Jerome Saibil (that's Eli and Jerome in the photo; Jerome is wearing the garland) are producing a video for high school students about the study of philosophy and its relevance to their lives.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20b    03/08/2002   Cole
Timelines, hiring plans, proposed policy changes focus of faculty meeting
President Simmons outlines the short-term, intermediate and long-term steps for the Initiatives for Academic Enrichment; Dean of the Faculty Mary Fennell outlines the spring discussions regarding temporary teaching needs for fall 2002. These discussions will set the stage for the faculty expansion to come.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20c    03/08/2002   Sweeney
Providence residents say there's more to a hot city than a great downtown
Using Providence as a case study, Marion E. Orr and Darrell M. West created a survey to determine factors that play into citizens' views about whether their urban domain is moving in the right direction. Police protection, street repairs, race relations and political leadership all weighed heavily on the way residents thought about life in the city, the survey showed.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20d    03/08/2002   Cole
The City: No Limits
"The City: No Limits" is the theme for this year's Brown University-Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference April 14-19. Keynote speaker is Tom Wolfe on April 14.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20e    03/08/2002   
In pursuit of the Muse
Newly published author Sameer Parekh finds medicine feeds creativity; Dean Marjorie Thompson's music "came out like a flood"
GSJ Story   26GSJ20f    03/08/2002   Curtis
Teaching awards go to Bonde, McIlwain and van Dam
Professors Sheila Bonde, James T. McIlwain and Andy van Dam have won the the latest Harriet W. Sheridan Award for Distinguished Contribution to Teaching and Learning. (GSJ of March 8, 2002)
GSJ Story   26GSJ20g    03/08/2002   Bramson
Antidepressant drug trials turn away many depressed patients
Studies establishing the effectiveness of antidepressants are based on highly selective samples of depressed patients. New research by Brown psychiatrists found as many as 85 percent of depressed patients treated in an outpatient setting would be excluded from the typical study to determine whether an antidepressant works.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20h    03/08/2002   Cole
Hospital care and patients' wishes often at odds
A just-released study led by Joan Teno, M.D., finds that more than one in three seriously ill patients who express their desire for comfort instead receive life-extending treatment that often prolongs their pain and suffering.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20j    03/08/2002   Turner
Archives - whether RI's or Brown's - are repositories for pieces of history
A recent collaboration between Rhode Island's secretary of state – a Civil War buff – and Brown highlights the richness of archival materials that are available to the public.
GSJ Story   26GSJ20k    03/08/2002   Bramson
Study details costs of providing care inconsistent with patient wishes
A new study shows how frequently seriously ill people who crave comfort receive more aggressive care instead. The study also details the costs and survival rates associated with this contrary care. It will appear in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society and was led by Brown Medical School researchers.
News Release   01-094    03/04/2002   Turner
Antidepressant drug trials turn away most of the depressed population
Studies establishing the effectiveness of antidepressants are based on highly selective samples of depressed patients. New research by Brown University psychiatrists found as many as 85 percent of depressed patients treated in an outpatient setting would be ex-cluded from the typical study to determine whether an antidepressant works.
News Release   01-091    03/01/2002   Cole
Proposal includes measures to reward, retain staff, president tells forum
University staff will play a crucial role in bringing Brown's Proposal for Academic Enrichment to a successful conclusion, President Simmons told a packed audience in Alumnae Hall Feb. 26. She outlines some of the steps the plan takes to reward and retain staff.
GSJ Story   26GSJ19a    03/01/2002   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Elisabeth Bell on transferring literature to film
Inquiring Minds with Elisabeth Bell, visiting professor, talks about turning a novel into a movie. Timed for Oscars
GSJ Story   26GSJ19b    03/01/2002   Curtis
Last Word: Should Brown arm its officers?
Should Brown arm its police officers? Two Brown students offer their opinions. Anne Barylick believes Brown officers should not be denied their tools. Dmitri Seals urges a broad discussion that includes a greater portion of the Providence community.
GSJ Story   26GSJ19e    03/01/2002   
Summary of Initiatives for Academic Enrichment
The Corporation of Brown University received and discussed a set of Initiatives for Academic Enrichment at its regular meeting Feb. 22-23, 2002. A summary of the document presented to the Corporation is reprinted in the March 1 edition of the George Street Journal.
GSJ Story   26GSJ19f    03/01/2002   
Brown Corporation endorses Proposal for Academic Enrichment
The Corporation of Brown University has endorsed the multiyear Initiatives for Academic Enrichment under which Brown will institute need-blind undergraduate admission, expand its faculty by as many as 100 additional faculty members, improve support for graduate students and make substantial new investments in libraries, information technology and academic space. Increases to the University's annual budget will reach $36 million by fiscal year 2005.
News Release   01-090    02/23/2002   Nickel
Corporation approves 4.6-percent increase in total charges for 2002-03
Overall charges for undergraduates at Brown University will rise 4.6 percent to $36,356 for the 2002-03 academic year. That figure includes a 4.8-percent increase in tuition (to $27,856).
News Release   01-092    02/23/2002   Nickel
International borders: passé or back with a vengence?
"The Re-Bordering of North America: Integration or Exclusion After September 11?" was the inaugural event in the Watson Institute's Joukowsky Forum in the institute's new building on Thayer Street.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18a    02/22/2002   Bramson
Six Brown professors present at AAAS annual meeting
The annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) draws approximately 4,000 attendees and 1,000 journalists. This year, six Brown professors -- James Anderson, Sheila Blumstein, Dan Brock, Xinsheng Sean Ling, Marc Tatar and Greg Tucker -- will be making presentations.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18b    02/22/2002   Staff
Universitiy reexamines issue of arming campus police
President Simmons is considering arming Brown's police force in the wake of a rash of robberies that have affected every segment of the campus community.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18c    02/22/2002   Cole
Festival brings best of French film to local audiences
For the fifth year, the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Research in Culture and Media Studies will join with nearly a dozen other University and community-based organizations in sponsoring an 11-day cavalcade of French cinema.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18f    02/22/2002   Curtis
Haffenreffer: Off-campus seaside jewel
The University's only museum houses more than 10,000 artifacts from the native people of the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific -- all 18 miles from The College Green.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18g    02/22/2002   Curtis
Czech, mate? Sure, and Russian, too, at Slavic coffee, tea gatherings
Put on by the Slavic languages department, the tea and coffee gatherings are one way students can fulfill class requirements to use the language they're studying outside the classroom. The Russian teas have been held regularly for the past six or seven years, and the Czech coffees began a little more than a year ago.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18h    02/22/2002   Bramson
Weekend celebration engages alumni, students in foreign policy issues
"America in the World: A Conversation with Foreign Policy Experts and Scholars" drew about 50 alumni, scholars and past employees as well as 50 students, community members and others.The gathering celebrated the 21st anniversary of the creation of Brown's Center for Foreign Policy Development. The center and the Institute for International Studies, in which the center was housed, were renamed in the early 1990s as the Watson Institute for International Studies.
GSJ Story   26GSJ18i    02/22/2002   Bramson
Brown, RISD, police and East Side neighbors to discuss security issues
Brown University will host a community meeting to discuss issues of crime and public safety at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, 2002, in MacMillan Hall, Thayer and George streets.
News Release   01-089    02/19/2002   
Superconductor discovery could lead to more efficient electricity
New research has shown that type-II superconductors really superconduct - they transmit electricity without dissipating energy. Xinsheng Sean Ling, assistant professor of physics at Brown University, will discuss his team's research, which answered a longstanding question in physics. Engineers can use this latest discovery to seek ways to distribute electricity more efficiently.
News Release   01-083    02/15/2002   Bramson
Brown to make six-month status reports to the city about parking plans
Brown University is conducting detailed traffic studies and user group surveys and is gathering estimates for construction and operating costs of a new parking structure. In this statement, Laura Freid, executive vice president for University relations and public affairs, discusses the University's planning process.
News Release   01-087    02/15/2002   Nickel
Johnnetta Cole to speak on King's life and legacy Feb. 20
Johnnetta B. Cole, president emerita of Spelman College, will present "The Life and Work of Martin Luther King, Jr.: Old Lessons for a New Day," this year's Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture, on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2002, at noon in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   01-085    02/11/2002   Curtis
Brown researchers find new photoreceptor and visual system in the eye
Rods and cones are not the only photoreceptors in our eyes. Reporting in theFebruary 8 issue of "Science," researchers at Brown University describe a third photoreceptor and a parallel visual system. The newly discovered cells turn light energy directly into brain signals. The signals govern the body's 24-hour clock.
News Release   01-080    02/07/2002   Turner
Ted Turner to speak Feb. 11 on "Our Common Future"
AOL Time Warner Vice Chairman Ted Turner will deliver the Stephen A Ogden Jr. '60 Memorial Lecture on International Affairs, titled "Our Common Future," on Monday, Feb. 11, 2002, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green.
News Release   01-084    02/07/2002   Curtis
Op-Ed: Bush's targeting of Iran is an inept foreign policy move
Iran's strategic location and economic importance make it both inevitable and imperative that the United States reestablish relations with the Iranians, rather than lob intemperate and ill-considered invective at them. It is a sad commentary on American political life that the State of the Union address should be used for cheap political shots.
News Release   01-082    02/05/2002   Nickel
Soros, Luce awards go to two seniors
Two Brown seniors recently learned that they are the recipients of awards from two prestigious programs. Elena Lesley received a Luce Scholarship to live and work in Asia; Mikhail Shapiro received a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans to continue his studies.
GSJ Story   28GSJ14a    02/04/2002   Cole
Miss Manners? Etiquette dinner gives students a refresher course
Career services is hosting an "etiquette dinner" to teach students how to gracefully spit out the bones when they're having dinner with a prospective employer or big client. The project is part of Career Week events that will bring alumni in to mentor students.
GSJ Story   26GSJ16c    02/01/2002   Cole
Looking to the future with respect for the past
As the University grows, maintaining and restoring its historic structures presents special challenges, from replacing period features to converting 18th century buildings to a 21st century use.
GSJ Story   26GSJ16d    02/01/2002   Ferguson
Faces of Brown: Daniel Nuey of Police and Security
Faces of Brown: Daniel Nuey of Police and Security
GSJ Story   26GSJ16e    02/01/2002   Montgomery
Page Turners: Soterios Zoulas and Paul Phillips
Orchestra director Paul Phillips and Soterios C. Zoulas, communications director at the Annenberg Institute
GSJ Story   26GSJ16f    02/01/2002   DeCesare
Inquiring Minds: Michael Vorenberg on widow activism
INQUIRING MINDS: History professor Michael Vorenberg on "widow activism" -- women like Lisa Beamer who rally in the wake of tragedy to do something positive.
GSJ Story   26GSJ16g    02/01/2002   Cole
York leads Whitehouse for governor; Kennedy leads GOP challengers
A survey of 461 statewide voters conducted Jan. 26-28, 2002, shows Myrth York leading Sheldon Whitehouse and Antonio Pires for the Rhode Island Democratic gubernatorial nomination and Rep. Patrick Kennedy leading all potential Republican challengers in the 1st District congressional race. The survey also finds a drop in the job approval rating for Gov. Lincoln Almond, but high numbers for President George W. Bush. Mayor Vincent A. Cianci Jr.'s approval rating has risen since a survey in September.
News Release   01-079    01/30/2002   Nickel
Rebuild the government and Afghans will rebuild their country
The way to support Afghanistan's evolution to peaceful representative government is to bind the Afghan people to the government and the government to the people. Money and experts can help, but the majority of the work cannot be done without the people's support and cooperation.
News Release   01-077    01/25/2002   Nickel
Capt. Rick Ziccardi retires as second-in-command at Police and Security
Capt. Rick Ziccardi, a resident of Freetown, Mass., retires Jan. 31 from his position as second-in-command of Brown's Department of Police and Security Services.
News Release   01-078    01/25/2002   Bramson
Sayles Hall portraits leave for the holidays
Three dozen of the University's famous portraits will rest in storage while Sayles Hall is closed for renovations during the winter. The two large portraits above the stage at the front of the hall – those of Francis Wayland and Nicholas Brown – will be cleaned and restored. All should return by Commencement.
GSJ Story   26GSJ15e    01/25/2002   Nickel
Rachel Pepper, Marshall scholar, headed for Cambridge
Rachel Pepper, who will graduate this June with a concentration in biophysics, will spend the next two years at the University of Cambridge pursuing her interest in physics, thanks to a Marshall scholarship. Pepper learned in early December she was one of 40 students across the country to receive the prestigious award.
GSJ Story   26GSJ15f    01/25/2002   Ferguson
Life writing helps students find their voices
Literature is more than entries on the best-seller list. According to Carol DeBoer-Langworthy, it includes letters, diaries – and the personal narratives of students in her life writing classes.
GSJ Story   26GSJ15l    01/25/2002   Curtis
Career Week dinner to serve etiquette lessons for job-seeking seniors
Cornish game hen, wild greens with cherry tomatoes, brownie royale and tips on dining etiquette are on the menu for a three-course mock interview dinner at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, in the Brown University Faculty Club. The dinner is part of Career Week 2002, Jan. 22-26, which features more than 100 alumni speakers.
News Release   01-076    01/17/2002   Cole
Brown unites offices of development, alumni, international advancement
Brown University will bring its development, alumni relations and international outreach efforts together under the direction of a senior vice president for University advancement. A national search is under way for this newly created position.
News Release   01-072    01/14/2002   Nickel
"Mark Dion: New England Digs" on exhibit at Bell Gallery
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host a new exhibition, "Mark Dion: New England Digs," at the List Art Center Jan. 26 to March 10, 2002. Dion will discuss his work during an opening reception on Friday, Jan. 15, 2002, at 5:30 p.m.
News Release   01-075    01/14/2002   Curtis
Bell Gallery to host John Pfahl's "Extreme Horticulture"
The David Winton Bell Gallery will host "Extreme Horticulture," a collection of landscape photographs by John Pfahl, Jan. 26 through March 10, 2002, in the lobby of the List Art Center. In conjunction with the exhibit, Pfahl will present a slide lecture Friday, March 1, at 5:30 p.m. in the List Auditorium.
News Release   01-074    01/11/2002   Curtis
Scholes to lead Modern Language Association of America
Robert Scholes, professor emeritus of modern culture and media, has been elected second vice president of the Modern Language Association of America, designating him as the association's vice president in 2003 and president in 2004.
News Release   01-071    01/09/2002   Curtis
Three Brown faculty members receive Fulbright Scholar grants
Professor Frances K. Goldscheider and visiting faculty members Saburo Haraguchi and Gustavo Florentino Vega-Canovas have been awarded Fulbright Scholar grants for 2001-2002.
News Release   01-070    01/07/2002   Curtis
Brown group advocates for South African asbestos victims
After researching the asbestos-related health and economic problems of South African mine workers, Nancy Jacobs, Lundy Braun and their students brought the victims' voices to their country's Parliament.
GSJ Story   26GSJ15a    12/19/2001   Ferguson
Brown University senior wins Marshall Scholarship
Brown senior Rachel Pepper will use her Marshall Scholarship to pursue her interest in math and physics at the University of Cambridge. Pepper is one of 40 American students named this year as recipients of this prestigious award.
News Release   01-068    12/13/2001   Ferguson
Op-Ed: Terrorism, Israel and America
The sense of national unity that followed the World Trade Center attacks has allowed the United States to undertake a strong response to terrorism. But enemies also develop unity when they, in turn, are attacked. We should not let our sense of national unity erode the natural strength of our diversity. Listening to the voices of dissent is the best insurance for our continuing democratic values.
News Release   01-067    12/12/2001   Nickel
Microsoft gives Brown students, faculty free access to most products
In selecting Brown University as a site for its Microsoft Developer Network Academic Alliance, Microsoft Corp. will give all students, faculty and staff access to a comprehensive package of programs -- products that are especially useful to those in the school's computer science and engineering departments.
News Release   01-065    12/07/2001   Ferguson
A successful war against terrorism cannot end with amnesty
History teaches us that extra-national terrorist organizations -- pirates, terrorists, barbarians -- must not be allowed to walk away from conflict once they lose the upper hand. Granting amnesty to such belligerents will only allow them to reappear and will embolden other groups which may share their ideology or methodology.
News Release   01-066    12/07/2001   Nickel
Michael Baron: Education Coordinator, Stage Director
Off Hours: Mike Baron of the Education Department and Arts Literacy program is directing Trinity Rep's seasonal offering of "A Christmas Carol."
GSJ Story   26GSJ14d    12/07/2001   Montgomery
Cheit offers ethics course to inmates
Associate Professor of Public Policy Ross Cheit moves each week to an off- campus classroom at the Adult Correctional Institution in Cranston, where he teaches ethics to prisoners in the Sex Offender Treatment Program.
GSJ Story   26GSJ14e    12/07/2001   Bramson
Inquiring Minds: Calvin Goldscheider on the Middle East
Calvin Goldscheider, Ungerleider Professor of Judaic Studies and professor of sociology at Brown, spoke with George Street Journal writer Kate Bramson recently about his latest book, "Cultures in Conflict: The Arab-Israeli Conflict," which was released at the end of October.
GSJ Story   26GSJ14g    12/07/2001   Bramson
Service learning serves community -- and volunteers
Students participating in the Swearer Center's service-learning program won't earn an A for ladling soup, but they can learn some valuable lessons and make a contribution to the community beyond College Hill.
GSJ Story   26GSJ14i    12/07/2001   Bramson
Waite-Franzen named VP for Computing and Information Services
Ellen J. Waite-Franzen, currently vice president for information services at the University of Richmond, has been named vice president for computing and information services at Brown University. Waite-Franzen will begin her duties at Brown Feb. 1, 2002.
News Release   01-063    12/03/2001   Nickel
Brown honors Charles Margiotta
Brown has established the Lt. Charles Margiotta Memorial Scholarship Fund to honor a New York City firefighter and 1976 alumnus who died in the World Trade Center attack.
GSJ Story   26GSJ13b    11/30/2001   Curtis
Rabbi Kirschen comes to Hillel
Interview with new Hillel director Rabbi Richard Kirschen.
GSJ Story   26GSJ13d    11/30/2001   Bramson
Researchers aid in oil spill monitoring and management
Kristy Pond and Yongsong Huang have developed an important new method for monitoring and managing land- and water-based oil spills.
GSJ Story   26GSJ13f    11/30/2001   Ferguson
R&R explores profiles, shadows and human nature
Rites & Reason's current research-to-performance project involves students creating and then performing roles of people who have been profiled on basis of race, sex, age.
GSJ Story   26GSJ13i    11/30/2001   Curtis
R.I. nursing homes improve under Brown-led project
A 15-month project on pain assessment and management, led by the Brown University Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research and Rhode Island Quality Partners (RIQP), has enabled nursing home residents to enjoy life more and, in some case, use less medication.
GSJ Story   26GSJ13j    11/30/2001   Turner
Op-Ed: Harry Potter and Whose Stone?
A small change in the American edition of the first Harry Potter book -- from philosopher's stone to sorcerer's stone -- robs the British original of an important connection to the history of human thought. The magic of Harry Potter, writes Robert Scholes, was designed by author J.K. Rowling to exist alongside "muggle" science.
News Release   01-060    11/28/2001   Nickel
Oliver Stone to speak and participate in student film festival Dec. 1
Noted writer and director Oliver Stone will be the guest of the Brown Lecture Board and the first Ivy Film Festival on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2001, when he will give a lecture at noon in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Stone will also participate in festival workshops.
News Release   01-062    11/28/2001   Curtis
Brown honors fallen firefighter with scholarship, Hall of Fame induction
Brown parent and trustee Martin Granoff and his wife Perry, of Saddle River, N.J., have given $1.4 million to the University to establish the Lt. Charles Margiotta Memorial Scholarship Fund. Margiotta, a member of the Brown Class of 1979, was among the firefighters who perished Sept. 11 in the World Trade Center. He was posthumously inducted into Brown's Hall of Fame along with all other members of the Ivy League champion football team of 1976.
News Release   01-058    11/27/2001   Curtis
Public meeting to gather comments on Brown's Life Sciences Building
In accordance the National Historic Preservation Act, the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission will host a public meeting to discuss Brown University's Life Sciences Building project. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2001, in the Saunders Inn Conference Room, 101 Thayer St.
News Release   01-059    11/27/2001   Nickel
Providence public schools are beneficiaries of Brown's EPA settlement
As part of a consent agreement and final order announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Brown University will spend $285,596 on a Supplemental Environmental Project much of which will directly benefit Providence public high schools. The SEP will include microscaled chemistry labs in four high schools, a computerized chemical management system for Providence public high schools, and summer workshops for high school chemistry teachers. Brown will also pay $79,858 in penalties levied by the EPA.
News Release   01-061    11/27/2001   Nickel
Drug-therapy combo helps alcoholics in treatment
Alcoholics treated with a combination of the drug naltrexone and coping skills training experienced fewer and less severe relapses, according to a newly published study led by Peter Monti.
GSJ Story   26GSJ12b    11/16/2001   Turner
Gulf War veterans get treatment, if not answers
The nature and cause of Gulf War Syndrome remain a mystery, but the veterans' experience in that conflict holds lessons for todays medical and miltary leaders, says Phil Brown.
GSJ Story   26GSJ12d    11/16/2001   Ferguson
Quilt to honor ‘Fallen but not Forgotten'
Student leaders from The Multi-Faith Council will coordinate the creation of a memorial quilt to honor the six Brown alumn and other friends of the Brown community who perished in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11.
GSJ Story   26GSJ12h    11/16/2001   Bramson
ACUP hears about computers, libraries
ACUP received reports Monday (Nov. 12) about investments the University must make in its libraries, computing infrastructure and IT training and development.
GSJ Story   26GSJ12k    11/16/2001   Nickel
Op-Ed: "The Great Game" continues
"The Great Game" – Kipling's term for great-power rivalry in Central Asia – is ongoing, with the United States, Russia, Pakistan, oil companies and other external forces competing to shape the Afghani future. The losers are likely to be the Afghani people.
News Release   01-057    11/15/2001   Nickel
Drug-therapy combination helps alcoholics in treatment
People in alcoholism treatment benefit from medication and coping skills training, according to a new Brown-led study published in "Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research."
News Release   01-053    11/14/2001   Turner
Op-Ed: German, Japanese help in Afghanistan may create problems
The addition of German and Japanese military resources to the U.S.-led war effort in Afghanistan raises Middle East suspicions and hatreds more than a century old and may create domestic problems for those two countries. But German and Japanese support is also proof that even the worst of enemies can eventually become friends.
News Release   01-055    11/12/2001   Nickel
Medical School to brief Rep. Kennedy about bioterrorism Nov. 12
On Monday, Nov. 12, the Brown Medical School will host a roundtable of experts to brief Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy on bioterrorism preparedness in Rhode Island. The briefing is by invitation only, but all participants will be available to speak with reporters afterward, at approximately 10:30 a.m. The briefing will take place in the main conference room, Saunders Inn, 101 Thayer St., on the Brown campus.
News Release   01-054    11/09/2001   Turner
Brown physicist a pioneer in calculating universe's dark matter
Physics professor Ian Dell'Antonio, who has been part of various efforts working toward trying to identify, weigh and measure everything in the universe, including dark matter. (GSJ of Nov. 9, 2001)
GSJ Story   26GSJ11a    11/09/2001   Ferguson
Rubertone challenges Roger Williams' views of Narragansetts
Patricia Rubertone doesn't want to knock Rhode Island's greatest colonial hero from his time-honored pedestal, but she would like us to know Roger Williams wasn't the ultimate authority on the area's Native Americans.
GSJ Story   26GSJ11b    11/09/2001   Curtis
Andrew Artenstein talks about bioterrorism
Inquiring Mind: Dr. Artenstein discusses issues of bioterrorism with the GSJ's Scott Turner.
GSJ Story   26GSJ11c    11/09/2001   Turner
Brown and Vernadsky: Science is an international thing
Planetary geologists at Brown and in Russia have collaborated across some difficult historical and political terrain, and they're still at it.
GSJ Story   26GSJ11h    11/09/2001   Ferguson
Rites & Reason performance summons the young Langston Hughes
"Langston, No Regrets," a new research to performance play at Rites & Reason, portrays Langston Hughes during 1923-24, a transformative point in the young writer's life.
GSJ Story   26GSJ11i    11/09/2001   Curtis
Bell Gallery to host new group exhibition through Dec. 30
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present "Before Reflection Begins," a new group exhibition featuring the work of five international artists -- Jin Soo Kim, Wolfgang Laib, Ernesto Neto, Valeska Soares and Marisa Telleria-Diez -- from Nov. 10 to Dec. 30, 2001, in the List Art Center.
News Release   01-052    11/07/2001   Curtis
Richard R. Spies named executive VP for planning, senior advisor
Brown University President Ruth J. Simmons has announced the appointment of Richard R. Spies as executive vice president for planning. Spies, who will begin his duties at Brown on Jan. 15, 2002, will also serve as the president's senior advisor.
News Release   01-051    11/06/2001   Nickel
Course on Vietnam War expands to encompass new campaign against terrorism
Jim Blight's course about the Vietnam war is evolving into a course comparing Vietnam with the United States' new campaign against terrorism and current events in Afghanistan
GSJ Story   26GSJ10b    11/02/2001   Bramson
Forum airs concerns regarding disciplinary system
Committee exploring how Brown's non-academic disciplinary procedures work holds community forum. The committee's report is due to be presented to president in January.
GSJ Story   26GSJ10d    11/02/2001   Bramson
Inquiring Minds: Jeffrey Singer on the Nobel Prize in medicine
Inquiring Minds: Jeffrey Singer, whose research here at Brown stems from the work done by latest winners of Nobel Prize in medicine, comments on the winners' research.
GSJ Story   26GSJ10e    11/02/2001   Turner
Ivy Film Festival debuts Dec. 1
The Brown Film Society seeks contributions to the Ivy Film Festival, which will be held on Brown campus Dec. 1. Winners will have their works posted at ifilm.com.
GSJ Story   26GSJ10f    11/02/2001   Curtis
Christopher Reeve presents Parents Weekend keynote lecture
Christopher Reeve presents Parents Weekend keynote lecture
GSJ Story   26GSJ10j    11/02/2001   Curtis
Hourglass Cafe: late-night java with a shot of social issues concerning hunger
Brown Oxfam opens a coffee bar in Bear's Lair called The Hourglass Cafe. Proceeds will benefot Oxfam America
GSJ Story   26GSJ09b    10/26/2001   Bramson
Faculty Scholars Program honors the "best of the best" of Brown
This year's crop of Faculty Scholars: Peter Lee, Marc Manseau, Joshua Farkas, Eric Stovkovich, Natasha Zaretsky
GSJ Story   26GSJ09c    10/26/2001   staff
Inquiring Minds: James Head on NASA chief's departure
Inquiring Minds: James Head reflects on tenure of NASA chair Daniel Goldin, who just stepped down
GSJ Story   26GSJ09g    10/26/2001   Ferguson
Geologist digs deep to unravel accurate account of storms long past
To help insurance industry determine the probability of major hurricanes striking a certain region, Jeffrey Donnelly looks back hundreds of years by taking core samples from marsh sediment
GSJ Story   26GSJ09h    10/26/2001   Ferguson
P&S a leading example of how campus law enforcement has matured nationwide
Police and Security a leading example of how campus law enforcement has matured nationwide. The force is accredited, many are trained to carry firearms, and one member has trained in exclusive FBI program.
GSJ Story   26GSJ09k    10/26/2001   Bramson
Brown Medical School to hold white coat ceremony Oct. 27
First-year students in the Brown Medical School will receive white coats during a campus ceremony at 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct 27, 2001. Media are welcome to attend the event at Alumnae Hall, 194 Meeting St., between Brown and Thayer streets.
News Release   01-049    10/24/2001   Turner
Providence residents rate police highly, unsure about treatment of races
A survey of 509 voters in Providence, conducted Oct. 20-21, 2001, finds a majority of voters rank Providence police highly and 30 percent believe Providence police have gotten better over the last year. Voters are divided on whether people are treated the same regardless of race; many think there should be more training on race relations and a civilian review process to check on citizen complaints.
News Release   01-046    10/23/2001   Nickel
Christopher Reeve to give Parents Weekend keynote lecture
Actor, director and activist Christopher Reeve will deliver the keynote address during this year's Parents Weekend on Friday, Oct. 26, 2001, at 7:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Because of space limitations, the event will be open only to Brown students and their parents. Limited space will be available to press by prior arrangement with the News Service.
News Release   01-047    10/23/2001   Curtis
John Carter Brown Library to host 18th-century architectural exhibit
The John Carter Brown Library is hosting a new public exhibition, Architectural Pattern Books in 18th Century America, an illustration of the influence of European styles on colonial construction now through Dec. 1 and again Dec. 16, 2001, to Feb. 15, 2002.
News Release   01-044    10/19/2001   Curtis
Teaching, learning at heart of Simmons' inaugural address
In her inaugural address, President Simmons paid ardent tribute to the enterprise of education.
GSJ Story   26GSJ08a    10/19/2001   Sweeney
Trio collaborates on modeling brain cell behavior
NSF gives nearly $5 million to Brown faculty working on IT: trio collaborates on modeling brain cell behavior.
GSJ Story   26GSJ08c    10/19/2001   Ferguson
Study finds disparities across state in enforcing drunk driving laws
Study finds disparities across state in enforcing drunk driving laws
GSJ Story   26GSJ08e    10/19/2001   Bramson
Classroom Visit Program introduces engineering to youngsters in local schools
Classroom Visit Program introduces engineering to youngsters in local schools
GSJ Story   26GSJ08g    10/19/2001   Ferguson
Research notes: shift-work research; use of meth during pregnancy
Mary Carskadon will participate in study of shift workers and sleep; Barry Lester on meth use during pregnancy
GSJ Story   26GSJ08m    10/19/2001   Turner
No stem cells used by Brown researchers are derived from human embryos
Research issue: No stem cells used by Brown researchers are derived from human embryos
GSJ Story   26GSJ08n    10/19/2001   Turner
Van Hentenryck in the hunt for algorithm that takes uncertainty into account
NSF gives nearly $5 million to Brown faculty working on IT: Van Hentenryck in the hunt for algorithm that takes uncertainty into account.
GSJ Story   26GSJ08q    10/19/2001   Ferguson
Alcohol, the ‘forgotten drug,' leads to unsafe sex among drug users
New findings link alcohol use and risky sex among injection drug users. The results appear in a Brown-led study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.
News Release   01-042    10/15/2001   Turner
Founder of U.S. hospice organizations receives top alumni award
The Brown Alumni Association presented its highest honor, the William Rogers Award, to Zachary Morfogen '50, the founding chairman emeritus of the National Hospice Foundation and the National Hospice Organization, during the 18th annual Alumni Recognition Ceremony Friday, Oct. 12, 2001.
News Release   01-039    10/12/2001   Curtis
Six alumni, victims of terrorists, to be honored in inaugural events
Six Brown alumni who perished in New York City, Pennsylvania and at the Pentagon will be remembered and honored during inaugural events this weekend.
News Release   01-041    10/12/2001   Curtis
Symbols of the office of president
The symbols of the office of President will be visible during Inauguration
GSJ Story   26GSJ07f    10/12/2001   
Study finds disparities across state in enforcing drunk driving laws
In Rhode Island, second-offense drunk drivers are accurately charged only 60 percent of the time, according to a study recently released by the Taubman Center for Public Policy at Brown University. Violators often receive lighter penalties than the law prescribes. The study recommends improvements to data collection and data access across jurisdictions.
News Release   01-037    10/11/2001   Bramson
Daily Weighing and Quick Action Keeps Pounds Off, Study Shows
Most successful dieters regain the weight they lost. But new research shows that a daily weigh-in – and quick adjustments to diet and exercise – can significantly help dieters maintain weight loss. The clinical trial, conducted by researchers at The Miriam Hospital and Brown Medical School, reports results of the first program designed specifically for weight loss maintenance. The study appears in the New England Journal of Medicine.
News Release   06-035    10/11/2001   Lawton
Jessye Norman forced to cancel her appearance
Because of international travel difficulties, soprano Jessye Norman has been forced to cancel her appearance at Brown University on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2001. The Brown University Orchestra will perform the concert, which will feature an appearance by the Tougaloo College Concert Choir, at 5 p.m. in Meehan Auditorium.
News Release   01-035    10/08/2001   Nickel
Chem 10 Web offers students online method of brushing up skills
This past summer, 28 entering freshmen were able to master their periodic tables in any number of settings, thanks to Chem 10 Web, an interactive Web-based course developed by the chemistry department to prepare students for college-level chemistry
GSJ Story   26GSJ06b    10/05/2001   Ferguson
Medical residency: an exercise in sleep deprivation
To meet educational and clinical obligations, most of the nation's 100,000 medical interns and residents work between 60 and 130 hours a week. Some now question the method. Brown Medical School and students hope to play a role in exploring the issue of sleep deprivation.
GSJ Story   26GSJ06h    10/05/2001   Turner
Sock and Buskin kicks off 100th season, anniversary celebration
The country's oldest college theater organization directed by faculty, Sock and Buskin has mounted hundreds of theatrical productions involving thousands of students, serving as their laboratory and preparing many for successful careers in professional theater. This season is its 100th, which will be marked by a variety of special events.
GSJ Story   26GSJ06i    10/05/2001   Curtis
Visionary thinkers to discuss the evolution and role of universities
In "The University As We Do Not Know It," moderator Frank Newman will engage former college and university presidents Johnnetta Cole, Vartan Gregorian, J. Jorge Klor de Alva and Frank Rhodes in an Inaugural Weekend discussion about the future of higher education. Jasmine Waddell, a 1999 Brown graduate who was a Truman Scholar, Rhodes Scholar and student body president, will provide a student and young alumni perspective.
News Release   01-036s    10/04/2001   Bramson
Faculty to present Voyages of Discovery forums Oct. 12-13
In celebration of the inauguration of Brown's 18th president, Ruth J. Simmons, the faculty will offer "Voyages of Discovery," a series of 20 public forums on a wide variety of topics, to be presented Oct. 12 and 13, 2001.
News Release   01-036v    10/04/2001   Curtis
Brown prepares to build new Life Sciences Building
The U.S. Post Office now located at 201 Meeting St. will move to 306 Thayer St. during the weekend of Oct. 6-8, 2001. Demolition of the former site will make way for construction of Brown University's new Life Sciences Building. Brown owns both buildings.
News Release   01-034    10/02/2001   Turner
An act of war or a crime against humanity?
The way we interpret events, especially traumatic events like the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, will have an impact on the options we consider for responding. Rather than interpreting this tragedy as an "attack on America" – a war – it would be better to frame it as "a crime against humanity."
News Release   01-033    09/28/2001   Nickel
Faculty-staff forum offers ways to cope with stress in wake of attacks
Faculty-staff session "Caring for yourself and loved ones after the trauma of Sept. 11" describes ways people can help themselves and loved ones if they are feeling traumatized by attacks.
GSJ Story   26GSJ05a    09/28/2001   Sweeney
Simmons prepares ACUP for rigorous semester
In the next few months, ACUP members will hear presentations from administrators who at Simmons' request have been gathering and evaluating a variety of data since summer. Simmons said she has asked the presenters to bring budget requests as well as ideas for strategic program investments, and is asking ACUP to think big.
GSJ Story   26GSJ05c    09/28/2001   Sweeney
Schultz on Deep Impact team, which hopes to peer into comet's core
On July 4, 2005, a spacecraft is scheduled to crash into Tempel 1's nucleus, leaving a crater the size of a football field and giving scientists, including Peter Schultz, a chance to see material that is as old as the solar system itself.
GSJ Story   26GSJ05d    09/28/2001   Ferguson
Page Turners for Sept. 28
Page Turners: Nadine Harris, David Konstan, Ruth Rosenberg
GSJ Story   26GSJ05g    09/28/2001   DeCesare
At Brown for Sept. 28
Memo from Police and Security; call for papers, and more
GSJ Story   26GSJ05h    09/28/2001   
Ancient Studies Program announces new seven-part lecture series
Funded by a grant from the Kirk Foundation, the Ancient Studies Program will sponsor the newly established Kirk Lecture Series for 2001-2002 titled Perceptions and Representations of the Past in Ancient Civilizations. The public is invited to attend the seven lectures free of charge. The series begins Oct. 1, 2001, and continues through March 11, 2002.
News Release   01-029    09/25/2001   Curtis
Op-Ed: Terror War against the superpower
We must come to terms with the reality that we cannot utterly control the powers of all peoples, and we must begin to imagine a world without superpowers. [Kevin Lourie]
News Release   01-031    09/25/2001   Nickel
Op-Ed: Is Charles Darwin the Most Dangerous Man in America?
To dedicated opponents of evolution, the battle against Darwin is never-ending. Well-funded critics of evolution will fulminate against this week's NOVA series on evolution, but their charges of "false" statements about the genetic code show only the emptiness of their so-called "evidence" against Darwin. Kenneth R. Miller, professor of biology, is the author of Finding Darwin's God.
News Release   01-028    09/24/2001   Nickel
Op-Ed: Fear itself: Why retaliation doesn't work
In Northern Ireland and Israel, history shows a pattern of escalation – that violence has only bred more violence. Similarly, previous U.S. retaliation against suspected terrorists has not brought an end to terrorism. [Neta Crawford]
News Release   01-030    09/24/2001   Nickel
Hillel prepares for High Holidays in wake of terrorist attacks
In wake of terrorist attacks, Hillel anticipates larger gathering for High Holidays
GSJ Story   26GSJ04a    09/21/2001   Bramson
Members of Brown family share their stories in wake of attacks
Brunonians share their experiences in wake of Sept. 11 terrorist attacks
GSJ Story   26GSJ04b    09/21/2001   staff
What do we tell our children?
Lewis P. Lipsitt, professor emeritus of psychology, medical science, and human development, offers advice to parents in the wake of the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center, Pentagon
GSJ Story   26GSJ04c    09/21/2001   Lipsitt
Campus blood drive exceeds goals in less than 3 hors
Campus blood drive held in wake of Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Response is overwhelming, with the goal exceeded in less than three hours
GSJ Story   26GSJ04d    09/21/2001   staff
Graduate School dean reflects on union issues
In May, the UAW petitioned the NLRB for exclusive right to represent certain teaching assistants and other graduate students at Brown. This summer, 28 Brown faculty and administrators provided testimony before the NLRB in Boston. Attorneys from Brown and the UAW will file final arguments in the case by Sept. 25. A talk with Peder Estrup, dean of the Graduate School and research
GSJ Story   26GSJ04e    09/21/2001   Nickel
Brown student logs development of polar bear cub
Little is known about polar bear cub development. Research conducted since last spring by senior Katy Greenwald will help change that.
GSJ Story   26GSJ04g    09/21/2001   Turner
High school curriculum promotes dialogue about recent terrorist attacks
Brown University's Choices for the 21st Century Education Project has created curricular materials to help high school teachers discuss policy direction in the aftermath of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks. The material is available free of charge on the Web.
News Release   01-026    09/20/2001   Bramson
Op-Ed: Bush's plan is excellent in principle, but falters on the details
In the Middle East, South and Central Asia, where the administration hopes to achieve the greatest cooperation, most governments sit very uneasily. If they don't cooperate, they risk military retribution by the U.S. If they do cooperate, they risk being overthrown, removed from office, or even assassinated by extreme elements in their own societies. William O. Beeman, professor of anthropology, has more than 30 years' experience in research throughout the Middle East and Central Asia.
News Release   01-027    09/20/2001   Nickel
Voters worry about terrorist attacks, are less confident in R.I. economy
In the wake of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, a survey of 413 Rhode Island voters conducted Sept. 15-16, 2001, finds 77 percent of Rhode Island voters worry about terrorist attacks. Sixty-eight percent think President Bush is doing a good job, up from 34 percent in June. The survey also finds sharply lower consumer confidence in the state economy and indications of a tight race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.
News Release   01-024    09/19/2001   Nickel
Herschel I. Grossman: Considering the costs and benefits of security
Economists are used to thinking about policy choices as involving a comparison of perceived costs and benefits. Can this perspective help us to understand why we protected ourselves so poorly that suicidal terrorists were easily able to hijack four airplanes in one morning?
News Release   01-022    09/17/2001   Nickel
Brent Stuart Goodwin: On war in the 21st century
Piracy on the high seas, as terrorism today, plagued the international system with raids, hostages and slavery and in general dealt in the currency of fear. In the early 19th century as now in the wake of the World Trade Center attack, the United States faced important choices of war and peace in securing freedom from fear.
News Release   01-023    09/17/2001   Nickel
Consider the source when weighing contradictory health advice
Searching for the proverbial "apple" in the adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away" has resulted in a lot of varying – and contradictory – information. How can you weigh the merits of such studies?
GSJ Story   23GSJ03i    09/14/2001   Cole
Shaken Brunonians react to Sept. 11 attacks on NYC, Pentagon
As horrific attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., unfolded Sept. 11, members of the Brown community met in groups large and small, seeking information and struggling to cope with grief and disbelief.
GSJ Story   26GSJ03a    09/14/2001   Sweeney
New self-report to help make psychiatric diagnoses
Two faculty members in the Medical School unveiled a new diagnostic/assessment report to improve routine clinical practice for all patients. Based on the current diagnostic manual, the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ) is designed to assess the most common psychiatric disorders encountered in an outpatient setting.
GSJ Story   26GSJ03g    09/14/2001   Turner
World Trade Center: Text of President Simmons' remarks to campus gathering
At 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, Brown President Ruth J. Simmons addressed brief remarks to faculty, students and staff who had assembled in The Salomon Center for Teaching. More than 1,200 members of the campus community attended, hundreds listening to an overflow broadcast on The College Green and in nearby classrooms. The text of President Simmons' remarks follows.
News Release   01-019    09/11/2001   Nickel
Study finds improvement in state and federal ‘e-government' Web sites
The second annual "e-government" survey, conducted by researchers at Brown University's Taubman Center, finds significant improvement in state and federal Web sites. Analysis indicates that Indiana, Michigan, Texas, Tennessee and Washington have the top-ranking online services among the 50 states and that the Food and Drug Administration, Department of Agriculture, Federal Communications Commission, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Internal Revenue Service rank most highly among federal agencies.
News Release   01-017    09/10/2001   Nickel
Brown contacts DEM about high arsenic levels in College Green soil
Brown University has filed a report with the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management describing levels of arsenic that exceed state limits in soil samples from The College Green. As the University works with the DEM to decide what remedial efforts may be appropriate, a geochemical consultant hired by Brown has reported that these concentrations of arsenic do not pose a health risk to the campus community, and that typical activities on the Green may continue.
News Release   01-018    09/10/2001   Nickel
Research notes: Goldscheider on fatherhood; Greenwald's shobot paper, NASA
Frances Goldscheider on fatherhood; Amy Greenwald on "shopbots"; students go weightless for science; meteorite's origin; more
GSJ Story   26GSJ01a    08/31/2001   staff
Education professor probes cultural differences in way preschoolers learn
Jin Li, assistant professor of education, does research about the cultural differences in the way American and Chinese children think about learning.
GSJ Story   26GSJ01b    08/31/2001   Cole
Mathiesen and tarot cards: divining the future and human nature
When Robert Mathiesen's Staff Development Day class on tarot reading and divination was among the first to be filled during registration, he wasn't surprised. Mathiesen believes such esoteric subjects pique our natural curiosity. "We're hard-wired for mystery, religion and spirituality," he explained.
GSJ Story   26GSJ01d    08/31/2001   Curtis
Simmons: "Every intellect is important"
In her Staff Development Day address July 31, President Simmons encouraged Brown to become a "community of leaders." During an Aug. 28 interview with the George Street Journal, Simmons elaborated upon that theme, and discussed her upcoming inauguration Oct. 14. Here are excerpts from that conversation.
GSJ Story   26GSJ01f    08/31/2001   Sweeney
Climate, not CO2, may drive make-up of plant communities
Rising carbon dioxide levels tied to global warming may not directly determine the composition of plant communities. Localized climate shifts appear to play a larger role, according to a Brown-led research team's report in this week's Science.
News Release   01-016    08/29/2001   Turner
President Simmons to welcome and address 1,381 freshmen students
Brown President Ruth J. Simmons will officially open the new academic year and welcome the Class of 2005 during the 238th Opening Convocation Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2001, at 11 a.m. on The College Green. Presiding at her first Opening Convocation as Brown's 18th president, Simmons also will deliver the keynote address.
News Release   01-014    08/28/2001   Curtis
Census study finds significant differences between Providence and state
Compared to statewide statistics, residents of Providence are more likely to be younger, live in rental housing, reside in single-parent families and be of mixed race, according to a study of census figures conducted by researchers at the Taubman Center for Public Policy at Brown University. Their report also finds significant variations in median age and living conditions for whites, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Hispanics.
News Release   01-013    08/27/2001   Nickel
Brown scientists identify Tagish Lake meteorite's origin in space
The well-preserved Tagish Lake meteorite has been identified as coming from a D-type asteroid, confirming that it contains the oldest raw materials among asteroids in the solar system. The study in the journal Science online by Brown geologists Takahiro Hiroi and Carle Pieters and a colleague from NASA shows that the meteorite fell from the mid-to-far end of the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.
News Release   01-011    08/23/2001   Kerlin
Bell Gallery to present work of Sean Scully Sept. 8 through Oct. 28
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present Sean Scully: Walls, Windows, Horizons from Sept. 8 through Oct. 28, 2001. Scully, an internationally acclaimed artist known for his abstract paintings, will discuss his work during an opening reception Friday, Sept. 7, 2001, at 6 p.m. in the auditorium of the List Art Center.
News Release   01-012    08/21/2001   Curtis
Gathering evidence toward the possibility of life on Mars
There have been many extraordinary claims of life on Mars, writes John Mustard, professor of geological sciences, yet none has proffered extraordinary evidence. During the next 20 years the continued exploration will bring us closer to answering that question.
News Release   01-010    08/10/2001   Kerlin
Summer collaboration with zoo, city schools introduces ABCs of teaching to MATs
About 70 local students entering grades 2-6 learned about biodiversity from Brown MAT students this past July in a collaborative program with Wheeler and Community Prep schools and Roger Williams Park Zoo.
GSJ Story   25GSJ31a    08/09/2001   Cole
STG grants help faculty wed humanities and technology
STG Faculty Grant Proposal Descriptions – Accepted Projects for 2002. Titon (who will do a multimedia project on the Rev. C.L. Franklin), Bonde, Massimo Riva, Steven Sloman; Shoggy Waryn and Annie Wiart, French Studies
GSJ Story   25GSJ31b    08/09/2001   Curtis
Hospice cuts hospital stays for nursing home residents
Elderly nursing home residents who receive hospice care through Medicare are less likely to be hospitalized in their last days of life compared to peers who do not receive such care or reside in facilities where it is not present, say a trio of Brown researchers.
GSJ Story   25GSJ31d    08/09/2001   Turner
Study explores drug treatment for teens' depression
A Brown-led study has produced some good news for the treatment of depression in teens. The largest clinical trial, treating major depression in adolescents with antidepressants, suggests that paroxetine, sold under the brand name Paxil, may be successful.
GSJ Story   25GSJ31e    08/09/2001   Turner
Diet and exercise cut type 2 diabetes risk drastically, study finds
A lifestyle intervention of diet and exercise helped people at high risk for type 2 diabetes lower their chances of developing the disease by 58 percent. Rena Wing, professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University, designed the intervention.
News Release   01-009    08/08/2001   Turner
Op-Ed: A new president for Indonesia, continued abuses for citizens
The ascension of Megawati Sukarnoputri was supported by one of the most brutal and unaccountable militaries in the world. Now, Janet Gunter writes, the United States and others must press her to become a force for change, reform and true, sustainable peace.
News Release   01-007    07/27/2001   Kerlin
Evidence of icy region and recent climate change observed on Mars
Evidence of water ice has been detected on Mars in a location that indicates the planet's climate has changed relatively recently – during the last 100,000 years, according to Brown University geologist John Mustard. The data was collected using NASA's Mars Orbiter Camera.
News Release   01-006    07/26/2001   Kerlin
Diane Balestri named VP for Computing and Information Services
Diane Pelkus Balestri, currently vice president at Vassar College, has been named vice president for computing and information services at Brown University. She will begin her work at Brown in January 2002.
News Release   01-005    07/25/2001   Nickel
Hospice care in nursing homes can reduce end-of-life hospital stays
The presence of hospice care in a nursing home cuts cumbersome and costly hospital stays for elderly residents in the last days of life, says a new Brown study in the "American Journal of Medicine."
News Release   01-004    07/23/2001   Turner
Donate a book during Staff Development Day
SAC is sponsoring a Bring a Book to Brown as a public service project during Staff Development Day
GSJ Story   25GSJ30b    07/20/2001   SAC
Watson Institute launches environmental programs
Seven scholars from various countries came to the Watson Institute for a semester of research on environmental issues in their home countries.
GSJ Story   25GSJ29a    07/06/2001   Kerlin
Students examine data for state agencies
Do Rhode Island's public policies work? Research carried out by several public policy concentrators last May has been turned over to the state agencies that provided the data.
GSJ Story   25GSJ29b    07/06/2001   Cole
Researcher leads nation's first long-term look at diabetes and weight loss
If some studies suggest that diabetics who lose weight die sooner, then what do you tell overweight diabetics who want to shed pounds? Rena Wing will try to answer that question over the next 12 years through a $180-million nationwide study of whether weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes decreases risk for heart disease, stroke and death.
GSJ Story   25GSJ29c    07/06/2001   Turner
Margaret A. Jablonski named dean for campus life at Brown University
Margaret A. Jablonski, interim associate vice chancellor for student affairs at the University of Connecticut-Storrs, has been appointed dean for campus life at Brown University.
News Release   00-157    06/29/2001   Nickel
First long-range look at the effects of weight-loss on type 2 diabetes
Rena Wing, professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University, is co-directing a new 12-year, $180-million nationwide study of how weight loss affects people with type 2 diabetes. Wing is also directing a study site at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, where she is based.
News Release   00-154    06/25/2001   Turner
Inquiring Minds: Richard besdine on living longer
Inquiring Minds: Richard Besdine on living longer
GSJ Story   25GSJ28b    06/22/2001   Turner
Professor teaches engineering, business to imprisoned teens
Engineering Professor Greg Crawford is working with RI Training School, teaching a class on engineering and entrepreneurism.
GSJ Story   25GSJ28e    06/22/2001   Kerlin
Brown announces new Department of Africana Studies
Brown University's Afro-American Studies Program has been upgraded to department status and will be renamed the Department of Africana Studies, effective July 1. The name change reflects an already broad focus on research and teaching about the African diaspora.
News Release   00-155    06/15/2001   Kerlin
81 percent of R.I. voters believe corruption is a problem for Providence
A statewide survey of 400 Rhode Island voters conducted June 9-11, 2001, finds 81 percent believe corruption is a problem in Providence city government. Forty-one percent think Providence Mayor Vincent A. Cianci Jr. is guilty of corruption charges, 21 percent think he is not guilty, and 38 percent are unsure. In a possible race for the U.S. House, Rep. Patrick Kennedy leads Gov. Lincoln Almond.
News Release   00-152    06/13/2001   Nickel
New material's odd traits to help improve computer memory
Scientists from Brown University and other labs have created a new type of material known as a half-metallic ferromagnet, which may lead to improvements in computer memory. Brown physicist Gang Xiao, with help from IBM, developed the single crystal films of the new material.
News Release   00-151    06/11/2001   Kerlin
Mount Hope bay warmer due to Brayton Point power plant discharge
Geologist John Mustard and others will brief Rep. Patrick Kennedy on the use of NASA's remote sensing technology in recording higher temperatures in Mount Hope Bay due to discharges from the Brayton Point power plant. The briefing will be held Tuesday, June 5, from 9:30 to 10:20 a.m. at the Lincoln Field Building, Room 105, located between George and Waterman streets. Press are welcome to attend.
News Release   00-146    06/04/2001   Kerlin
Op-Ed: Liberians' fear of being denied refuge is a real one
No one – not the Liberians or any other immigrant or refugee group – should have to worry about returning to a country where they would fear for their lives, writes recent Brown graduate Melissa Bowman.
News Release   00-147    06/04/2001   Kerlin
Disagreement – not harmony – is key to business success, study says
In money-making organizations, respectful disagreement among colleagues – not close friendships – is the ideal, according to a new study by Brown sociologist Brooke Harrington. Harrington's study appeared in the May issue of Research in the Sociology of Organizations
News Release   00-148    06/04/2001   Cole
Brown, Trinity Rep form consortium for graduate study in theater arts
Brown University and Trinity Repertory Company have formed a consortium to offer new master's and doctoral programs in theater arts. The new consortium, approved by the Brown faculty and Trinity Rep's board of trustees earlier this month, was approved by the Brown Corporation Saturday, May 26. Discussions are underway to include Rhode Island College and the Rhode Island School of Design as future consortium partners.
News Release   00-145    05/31/2001   Nickel
University urges grad students to preserve collegial mentoring relationship
In a recent letter e-mailed to faculty and graduate students, Provost Kathryn Spoehr and Dean of the Graduate School Peder Estrup discussed a petition filed by the United Auto Workers before the National Labor Relations Board in Boston. The UAW is asking the NLRB for the exclusive right to represent teaching assistants at Brown.
News Release   00-149    05/31/2001   Nickel
Bell Gallery to exhibit latest Fessler work and new acquisitions
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present "Ann Fessler: Close to Home" and "Recent Acquisitions by Yitzak Elyashiv, Richard Fleischner, Irene Lawrence, and Howard Ben Tre" June 9 through July 8, 2001, in the List Art Center.
News Release   00-143    05/30/2001   Curtis
Faculty presents highest honor to Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein
During Commencement ceremonies May 28, Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein, the Albert D. Mead Professor of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, received the highest honor Brown's faculty can bestow -- the Rosenberger Medal -- as well as an honorary Doctor of Science degree and an endowed undergraduate scholarship fund named in her honor. A portrait of Blumstein, which will hang in Sayles Hall, was unveiled Friday evening, May 25.
News Release   00-144    05/28/2001   Sweeney
Faculty, trustee and students to receive Commencement honors
Faculty members, a former University chancellor, graduate students and undergraduate students have been selected to receive special honors during Commencement ceremonies on Monday, May 28, 2001.
News Release   00-142    05/25/2001   Curtis
Public gives R.I. State Police high marks on professionalism and service
A survey of 372 people who received a traffic citation, filed an accident report or contacted the State Police to report an incident or offense during calendar 2000 finds high public ratings of the professionalism, courtesy, fairness and service delivery of the Rhode Island State Police. The survey was conducted May 5-9, 2001, by researchers at Brown University.
News Release   00-137    05/23/2001   Cole
John Carter Brown Library hosts new maritime history exhibit
The John Carter Brown Library is hosting a new exhibit, titled "The European Conquest of the Oceans, 1450 to 1830: A Selection of Original Sources on Maritime History from the John Carter Brown Library," now through Sept. 15, 2001.
News Release   00-139    05/23/2001   Curtis
Brown will award nine honorary degrees at Commencement May 28
Honorary degree recipients at Brown University's 233rd Commencement will be former Secretary of State Madeleine Korbel Albright; Kofi Annan, secretary-general of the United Nations; Professor Sheila E. Blumstein, interim president of Brown University; mathematician and physicist Demetrios Christodoulou; Oskar Eustis, artistic director of Trinity Repertory Company; Margaret H. Marshall, chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court; visual scientist Lorrin A. Riggs; author Philip Roth; and Lawrence M. Small '63, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.
News Release   00-135    05/21/2001   Sweeney
Op-Ed: Corruption is losing its role in China
In China, corruption has provided incentives for local government officials in much the same way as methods of compensation in Western economies. There are increasingly good reasons, however, for the Chinese authorities to reconsider their policy of tolerating corruption.
News Release   00-138    05/21/2001   Kerlin
Harold Cohen, a lifelong learner
Harold Cohen says it's never too late to start. He married at age 40. At a time when some people become grandparents, he became a father. In 1987, Cohen entered Brown as a 71-year-old student resuming an undergraduate education. He graduates this Memorial Day at age 84.
GSJ Story   25GSJ27c    05/21/2001   Turner
Nine honorary degrees will be presented at Commencement
Nine will receive honorary degrees at Commencement: Madeleine Albright; Kofi Annan of the United Nations; Sheila E. Blumstein, interim president; mathematician and physicist Demetrios Christodoulou; Oskar Eustis of Trinity Repertory Company; Margaret H. Marshall of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court; author Philip Roth; visual scientist Lorrin A. Riggs; and Lawrence M. Small of the Smithsonian Institution.
GSJ Story   25GSJ27e    05/21/2001   Sweeney
Africana Studies reflects broad focus
Faculty meeting approves name change and department status for Afro-American studies. Department of Africana Studies awaits Corporation-level approval
GSJ Story   25GSJ27f    05/21/2001   Kerlin
Students send medical supplies to Armenian hospital in need
REMEDY, a group run by medical students, collects unused medical supplies from hospitals and physicians and redistributes them to local and international charities. Most recent shipment went to Armenian hospital
GSJ Story   25GSJ27j    05/21/2001   Turner
Student Life celebrates Joslin and Jin award recipients
The Office of Student Life will sponsor a ceremony on Friday, May 25, at 4 p.m. in room 101 of Salomon Center to honor recipients of the Joslin Awards and the Jin Prize.
GSJ Story   25GSJ27l    05/21/2001   Sweeney
Syringe prescriptions may help prevent HIV spread
Syringe prescriptions written by physicians are a feasible way to increase the access of injection drug users to sterile syringes for HIV prevention, according to a Brown-led pilot study.
GSJ Story   25GSJ27m    05/21/2001   Turner
Blumstein on her presidency: 'exciting and stimulating'
As Professor Sheila E. Blumstein entered the final weeks of her interim presidency, she sat down with the George Street Journal to talk about the success, challenges and surprises she's experienced since being named interim president on Feb. 9, 2000.
GSJ Story   25GSJ27p    05/21/2001   Kerlin
Madeleine Albright to deliver Baccalaureate address on May 27
Madeleine Albright, U.S. secretary of state during the second Clinton administration, will address graduating seniors during the Baccalaureate service on Sunday, May 27, 2001, at 1:30 p.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   00-133    05/15/2001   Curtis
Partners in Health founder Paul Farmer to speak at medical Commencement
Medical anthropologist Dr. Paul Farmer will speak at the Brown Medical School Commencement Convocation Monday, May 28, in the First Unitarian Church of Providence. Eighty-one students will graduate. The medical graduates will also hear addresses from Edward Feller, M.D., of the Brown Medical School faculty, and Derrick Hamilton, a member of the graduating class. The two-hour convocation will begin at 8:45 a.m.
News Release   00-134    05/11/2001   Turner
Upholding a Brown tradition, two seniors will address graduating class
Ana Escrogima of New York City and Joshua Levine of North Hollywood, Calif., will deliver orations during Brown's 233rd Commencement Monday, May 28, 2001, at 10:15 a.m. in the Meeting House of the First Baptist Church in America.
News Release   00-131    05/07/2001   Cole
‘Just in time teaching' taking place in Brown classrooms
"Just in time teaching" is a method that combines materials on the Web witl a lively classroom environment. One Brown professor who uses the method in a physics course gives the method high marks
GSJ Story   25GSJ26c    05/04/2001   Kerlin
Ear drops may reduce need for antibiotics to treat ear infections
Selected use of eardrops may prevent overprescription of antibiotics for childhood ear infections while satisfying the desire of parents to treat the illness, says a new study by Medical School researchers.
GSJ Story   25GSJ26d    05/04/2001   Turner
Study finds barriers to immigrants' involvement in their children's education
A study of 308 Dominican, Cambodian and Portuguese parents found a low level of parental involvement in their childrens'education due to several factors, including discomfort with the English language, cultural conceptions of the role of teachers and parents, and lack of familiarity with the system.
GSJ Story   25GSJ26e    05/04/2001   Cole
Wriston and Slone fellowships awarded to four Brown professors
James Mahoney and Marc Perlman receive Wriston Fellowships; Greg Landsberg and David Sheinberg receive research fellowships from Sloan Foundation
GSJ Story   25GSJ26f    05/04/2001   Kerlin
NPR's Ira Glass to speak on ‘A New Kind of Radio' May 6
Ira Glass '82, host and producer of NPR's "This American Life" and a 1982 graduate of Brown, will speak on "Lies, Sissies and Fiascoes: Notes on Making a New Kind of Radio" at 8 p.m. Sunday, May 6, 2001, in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. The public and media are welcome, but seating is limited.
News Release   00-127    05/02/2001   Curtis
Ear drops may reduce need for antibiotics to treat ear infections
Selected use of eardrops may prevent overprescription of antibiotics for childhood ear infections while satisfying the desire of parents to treat the illness, says a new study by Brown Medical School researchers. They will present the findings April 30 at the 2001 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting.
News Release   00-105    04/30/2001   Turner
Eight Brown employees receive President's Achievement Awards
Eight Brown employees are the recipients of the 2001 President's Achievement Awards, which recognize exceptional innovation, initiative and service. The awards were presented April 30 by Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein.
News Release   00-123    04/30/2001   Sweeney
Howard Foundation names 13 fellowship recipients for 2001-02
The George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation, administered by Brown University, has announced 13 fellowships of $20,000 each for the 2001-2002 academic year in the areas of painting, sculpture and art history. For 2002-03, the Foundation will provide fellowships in music, musicology, playwriting and theater arts.
News Release   00-125    04/30/2001   Nickel
Study finds barriers to immigrants' involvement in children's education
A study of 308 Dominican, Cambodian and Portuguese parents found a low level of parental involvement in their children's education due to several factors, including discomfort with the English language, cultural conceptions of the role of teachers and parents, and lack of familiarity with the system.
News Release   00-124    04/27/2001   Cole
Study finds holes dug in dry-sand beach can collapse and suffocate
Digging holes in dry sand, a frequent activity for children during a day at the beach, carries a risk of sudden death and other dangers, says a Brown University medical student whose study appears in the current Journal of the American Medical Association.
GSJ Story   25GSJ25c    04/27/2001   Turner
Office of Campus Life begins study of Campus Climate Assessment
The Office of Campus Life and Student Services at Brown University has received results of a campuswide assessment it commissioned early this year. That study, prepared by Mcguire Associates Inc. of Boston, gathered information and opinions from 45 percent of undergraduates, 31 percent of graduate students and 39 percent of medical students via the Web during February.
News Release   00-121    04/25/2001   Nickel
Journalist Robert Zelnick to speak on open government and privacy
Former ABC News correspondent Robert Zelnick will speak on "Open Government v. Privacy Concerns" at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 2, 2001, in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-122    04/25/2001   Curtis
Study finds persistent and severe pain among nursing home residents
The first national look at pain among the frailest nursing home residents uncovers "woefully inadequate pain management," say its Brown Medical School authors. Their study appears in the April 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   00-118    04/24/2001   Turner
Three faculty members win 2001 Guggenheim Fellowships
Three associate professors on the Brown faculty -- Maggie Bickford, Amy Remensnyder and Joan L. Richards -- have received Guggenheim Fellowships for 2001. They are among 183 scholars and artists selected from more than 2,700 applicants for this honor.
News Release   00-120    04/20/2001   Curtis
Demographers are eager to tap Census 2000 data
With the release of Census 2000 data, Brown researchers in a variety of disciplines — from economics to sociology — are thinking about how they will tap the new information.
GSJ Story   25GSJ24a    04/20/2001   Cole
Inquiring Minds: James Patterson on legacy of Brown v. Board of Education
Inquiring Minds: James Patterson on legacy of Brown v. Board of Education
GSJ Story   25GSJ24b    04/20/2001   Curtis
Diary of a loser
Participant in Flynn diet study records her experiences.
GSJ Story   25GSJ24c    04/20/2001   Curtis
Three medical students lend helping hands at quake site in India
Originally headed to India to join hospital rotations for fourth-year electives, Amit Joshi, Anish Sheth and Jason Slosberg adjusted their schedules to spend a week helping patients in a makeshift international Red Cross center in the flattened city of Bhuj
GSJ Story   25GSJ24f    04/20/2001   Turner
Crew teams' Lenten generosity helps parish outreach project in Haiti
During Lent, Frank Almeida places a box at the Brown Boathouse to collect change that heads to Haiti through Ss. Peter and Paul Cathedral. This year, members of the crew teams placed more than $175 into the box. Sheila Walsh and Luke Cunningham, captains of crew teams, will present the box to the priest at the cathedral on Palm Sunday.
GSJ Story   25GSJ24g    04/20/2001   Rose
Study finds holes dug in dry-sand beach can collapse and suffocate
Digging holes in dry sand, a frequent activity for children during a day at the beach, carries a risk of sudden death and other dangers, says a Brown University medical student whose study appears in the current Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   00-119    04/18/2001   Turner
Ellen O'Connor named vice president for finance at Brown University
Ellen M. O'Connor, an executive with more than 20 years experience in health care, economic development and state and municipal governments, has been named vice president for finance at Brown University. She will succeed Vice President and University Controller Judith Michalenka, who retires June 30.
News Release   00-113    04/13/2001   Nickel
Discussions are only the beginning of diversity initiatives
Dean of College, Office of Campus Life and Student Services, UCS and other parties join forces to prepare diversity orientation pilot project, year-round community-building conversations
GSJ Story   25GSJ23a    04/13/2001   Sweeney
ACUP reviews plan for grad students' health insurance
At its meeting April 9, the Advisory Committee on University Planning (ACUP) reviewed a proposal that in the course of five years would reduce to zero the amount graduate students would have to pay for health insurance.
GSJ Story   25GSJ23b    04/13/2001   Sweeney
Inquiring Minds: Hopmann on actions since collision of Chinese, U.S. planes
Inquiring Minds: Terry Hopmann on actions since collision of Chinese, U.S. planes
GSJ Story   25GSJ23d    04/13/2001   Kerlin
Making connections - electronic and othewise - in Career Services
It used to be that graduating seniors stopped by the Career Services office, did some interviews and got "placed." It hasn't worked that way for a while. Career Services now helps seniors and a growing number of alums find their way in a Web-fueled network-driven world.
GSJ Story   25GSJ23e    04/13/2001   Nickel
Research Notes: engineered DNA; visual control of locomotion; space weathering
Research Notes: engineered DNA; visual control of locomotion; space weathering on minerals
GSJ Story   25GSJ23f    04/13/2001   staff
Women who have sex with other women need to know HIV and STD risks
In their survey of 504 lesbians and bisexual women, Brown researchers Kate Morrow and Jenifer Allsworth found that the majority engaged in multiple episodes of unprotected sex monthly, yet few thought they were at risk for HIV or other STD infections
GSJ Story   25GSJ23g    04/13/2001   Turner
Survey of graduate students' library use
Survey of graduate student use of libraries
GSJ Story   25GSJ23i    04/13/2001   Library
Boswell to deliver inaugural Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture
Washington Post sports columnist and best-selling author Thomas Boswell will deliver the first Casey Shearer Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, April 25, 2001, at 6:30 p.m. in Starr Auditorium, MacMillan Hall. The evening's program will include the first presentation of the annual Casey Shearer Memorial Award for Excellence in Creative Nonfiction.
News Release   00-117    04/11/2001   Curtis
Applications available for Brown Summer High School July 2-27
Brown Summer High School, which runs July 2-27 this year, offers students entering grades 9 through 12 the opportunity to build critical-thinking, reading, writing and problem-solving skills. The cost is $100; a limited amount of financial aid is available.
News Release   00-115    04/10/2001   Sweeney
Bell Gallery to exhibit selections from its collection through May 28
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a new exhibition, Selections from the Collection, opening April 14 and continuing through May 28, 2001, at the List Art Center. An opening reception and lecture by curator Vesela Sretenovic are set for Friday, April 13, at 6 p.m. at the Gallery.
News Release   00-116    04/10/2001   Curtis
Health alert for students who visited Acapulco during spring break
Brown University's Office of Health Services has issued a health alert for students who visited Acapulco during spring break. An easily treated fungal infection has been identified in the air conditioning ducts of a hotel there.
News Release   00-114    04/09/2001   Nickel
CBS anchor Dan Rather to receive journalism award April 16
CBS News anchor Dan Rather will be presented with Brown University's Welles Hangen Award for Superior Achievement in Journalism on Monday, April 16, 2001, at 11 a.m. in Sayles Hall on The College Green. This award honors the memory of Welles Hangen '49, a journalist captured and executed by Viet Cong and Khmer Rouge guerillas in Cambodia.
News Release   00-112    04/06/2001   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Economist Ignacio Palacios-Huerta on the stock market
Inquiring Minds: Economist Ignacio Palacios-Huerta on the stock market
GSJ Story   25GSJ22c    04/06/2001   Cole
Dame Cicely Saunders, hospice movement founder, to speak April 19
On Thursday, April 19, 2001, at 4 p.m. Dame Cicely Saunders, M.D., will deliver a lecture titled "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow: Reflections on End-of-Life Care," in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. Her lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-111    03/30/2001   Turner
Bell Gallery to join in Dion's New England Digs Project April 3 to 6
The David Winton Bell Gallery will work with artist Mark Dion on his New England Digs Project, beginning with an April 2-6, 2001, dig of the Seekonk River near Brown's Marston Boat House. The project will culminate in an exhibition at the Bell Gallery next year.
News Release   00-110    03/29/2001   Curtis
Former Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell to speak April 16
Kim Campbell, elected in 1993 as the first woman Prime Minister of Canada, will deliver a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. '60 Memorial Lecture on "Culture, Trade and Globalization" at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 16, 2001, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This event is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-109    03/28/2001   Curtis
Brown issues statement on campus security in response to mail threat
Following a Brown student's receipt of threatening mail, the University reminded students of security services, especially those that will be available throughout spring break. Interim President Sheila Blumstein reinforced the University's opposition to all forms of racism and intolerance.
News Release   00-106    03/23/2001   Sweeney
Overall, construction workers welcome warm-weather wear
As the temperature begins to rise, construction workers on campus will shed the layers of clothing they've worn all winter for protection against the frigid air of their outdoor workplace. Through rain, snow and biting cold, as many as 140 people worked outside each winter day on two building projects: the Watson Institute for International Studies at the corner of Thayer and Charlesfield streets, and English department expansion on the corner of Brown and Angell streets.
GSJ Story   25GSJ21a    03/23/2001   Cole
Making editorial decisions about controversial content
Balancing a community's sensitivities against the constitutional right to free speech is a tricky feat, one that often makes decisions about whether and how to run controversial material difficult even for veteran editors and journalists. In the wake of protests over the Brown Daily Herald's May 13 publication of a paid advertisement, several journalists weighed in on the process of making the tough decisions.
GSJ Story   25GSJ21d    03/23/2001   Curtis
Blumstein asks faculty to support those offended by ad
At the faculty meeting held March 20, Interim President Blumstein reaffirms the University's defining values of free speech and expression. She also called upon the Brown community to support those who were offended by an advertisement published March 13 in the Brown Daily Herald. She issued a statement afterward reiterating these points.
GSJ Story   25GSJ21e    03/23/2001   Sweeney
Inquiring Minds: S. Hamburg on carbon dioxide emissions and Bush administration
Inquiring Minds: Steven Hamburg, Ittleson Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and Biology, answered questions posed by Janet Kerlin about air pollution and the power industry. The Bush administration has reversed itself and said it won't restrict carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.
GSJ Story   25GSJ21f    03/23/2001   Kerlin
Off Hours: Scott Allen, clinical assistant professor, singer-songwriter
Off Hours: For Scott Allen, M.D., life is about making people feel better. He does his healing through medicine and music. A full-time physician at the Adult Correctional Institutions (ACI), Allen also maintains a private practice. In the Medical School, he teaches residents at Miriam Hospital.
GSJ Story   25GSJ21g    03/23/2001   Turner
Publishing is a sideline at John Carter Brown Library
There will be a new book on the shelves next month at the John Carter Brown (JCB) Library. While that's certainly not an unusual event for any library, it's one that's been eagerly anticipated at this library, where Director Norman Fiering and his staff expect to take delivery on Barbara B. McCorkle's "New England in Early Printed Maps, 1513 to 1800: An Illustrated Carto-Bibliography."
GSJ Story   25GSJ21h    03/23/2001   Curtis
General Motors to fund $3-million materials lab at Brown
Brown University engineers will conduct research in lightweight materials funded with $3 million from General Motors. The collaborative lab at Brown will develop computer models of how materials behave, culminating in the prediction of mechanical properties of finished parts in vehicles.
News Release   00-107    03/21/2001   Kerlin
A call for support, debate and dialogue to resolve disagreements
At the March faculty meeting, Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein reaffirmed the University's defining values of free speech and expression. She also called upon the Brown community to support those who were offended by the March 13 publication of an ad in the Brown Daily Herald, and to move forward with discussion, debate and dialogue.
News Release   00-103    03/20/2001   Nickel
ACLU President Nadine Strossen to speak on "Cyberliberties" April 5
Nadine Strossen, president of the American Civil Liberties Union, will deliver the 35th annual Alexander Meiklejohn Lecture on Thursday, April 5, 2001, at 7:30 p.m. in Sayles Hall on The College Green. The public is welcome.
News Release   00-101    03/19/2001   Curtis
Former FDA head David Kessler to discuss confronting ‘Big Tobacco'
On Thursday, April 5, 2001, at 4:30 p.m., David Kessler, M.D., will speak about "Tobacco Wars" in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. His lecture will be followed by a question and answer session. It is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-098    03/16/2001   Turner
Author Samuel Shem to speak on medicine and literature April 4
Novelist Samuel Shem (a pseudonym for Stephen J. Bergman, M.D.) will speak on "Fiction as Resistance: Healing in Hard Medical Times" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, 2001, in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green. This ninth annual Harriet W. Sheridan Literature and Medicine Lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-100    03/16/2001   Curtis
Celebration of Community will be held April 10
Celebration of Community at Brown April 10th. Speaker is Dr. Mildred Garcia, Associate Provost of Arizona State University West. She will speak at a noon and 4 p.m. Prez Office will give out her book in advance to inform eight campus wide discussion groups for staff concerning affirmative action, diversity. Faculty/staff will facilitate these groups.
GSJ Story   25GSJ20b    03/16/2001   EEO
Lectureship created in thanks for caring medical student, physician
Medical student and Miriam M.D. were so tender in their care of a patient that the patient's family endowed a lecture series aimed at promoting humane patient-doctor relationships
GSJ Story   25GSJ20c    03/16/2001   Turner
Staff Advisory Committee reports on parking, workplace relations, training
For the past year, the 20 members of the President's Staff Advisory Committee (SAC) have been hard at work exploring such issues as parking, service excellence, workplace relations, employee recognition, and outreach and communication. Their research culminated in the presentation of recommendations to Interim President Blumstein last November, and Blumstein responded to their recommendations in late February.
GSJ Story   25GSJ20d    03/16/2001   Sweeney
Exchange student discovers community theater
Hidetake Miyamoto, an exchange student at Brown for the year, is in the current play at Perishable Theater, "Exchange at Cafe Mimosa." He comes from Keio University in Tokyo, Japan. He plays the Asian man who doesn't speak English.
GSJ Story   25GSJ20e    03/16/2001   Curtis
Students help bridge the gap between poverty, good health
Through Project HEALTH (Helping Empower, Advocate and Lead through Health), 75 student volunteers are working with underprivileged children suffering from asthma, sickle cell anemia and other health problems to educate them about their illnesses and foster good health habits.
GSJ Story   25GSJ20f    03/16/2001   Curtis
Conference to address implications of charting the human genome
Four panels will address questions raised by charting the human genome at a conference titled "Genetic Influences on Human Behavior and Development" April 5-6, 2001, in Leung Gallery at Faunce House. The event is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-097    03/15/2001   Cole
Once again, a crossroads in the Balkans
By limiting U.S. troop deployments, the Bush administration sends encouragement to Albanian terrorists. To the people of the Balkans who so earnestly seek peace and stability it sends an insult that will only create disillusion and division.
News Release   00-096    03/13/2001   Kerlin
Balkan experts to speak on "The Downfall of the Milosevic Regime"
Misha Glenny and Aleksa Djilas, historians and expert commentators on the Balkans, will deliver a joint presentation titled "The Downfall of the Milosevic Regime and Its Aftermath" at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14, 2001, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Their presentation is part of the Watson Institute's Directors Lecture Series.
News Release   00-095    03/09/2001   Nickel
Memorial service for Elizabeth J. Cronin set for Monday, March 12
The Office of the Chaplains and Religious Life has scheduled a memorial service for Elizabeth J. Cronin at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 12, 2001, in Sayles Hall. In addition, the offices of Student Life and Psychological Services will host a discussion group at noon Friday, March 9, in North Wayland Lounge.
News Release   00-094    03/07/2001   Nickel
Dieting study finds Internet effective in producing initial weight loss
The Internet appears to be a viable method for delivery of structured behavioral weight loss programs, says Deborah F. Tate of the Brown Medical School. Tate's study in the March 7, 2001, Journal of the American Medical Association is the first to examine the use of in-formation technology to aid weight loss.
News Release   00-093    03/06/2001   Cole
Inquiring Minds: Thomas Lasater on faith-based delivery of health care
Inquiring Minds: Thomas Lasater on faith-based delivery of health care
GSJ Story   25GSJ19b    03/02/2001   Turner
A Brown physician has created a form for pediatricians to use to question parents about their childrens' sleep habits
Pediatric sleep-disorders form developed
GSJ Story   25GSJ19d    03/02/2001   Turner
Philip Lieberman research on effects of long-term exposure to humans at high altitudes - from Everest to space.
Researchers to devise brain monitoring system for Mars exploration
GSJ Story   25GSJ19g    03/02/2001   Cole
Off Hours: Michael McKeown, biologist, activist for rigorous math education
Off Hours: Michael McKeown, biologist, activist for rigorous math education
GSJ Story   25GSJ19i    03/02/2001   Cole
R.I. voters favor car tax phaseout; oppose Clinton pardon of Rich
A survey of 350 statewide voters conducted Feb. 24-25, 2001, find voters support phasing out the state tax on cars and strongly oppose President Clinton's pardon of Marc Rich. Nearly two-thirds of voters feel the state is headed in the right direction and believe education, unemployment and jobs are the most important problems facing the state.
News Release   00-087    02/27/2001   Nickel
John Medesky to headline 14th Brudner Memorial Concert March 3
Organist John Medesky of Medesky, Martin and Wood will perform with the Brown Jazz Band when the Music Department presents its 14th annual Eric Adam Brudner '84 Memorial Concert on Saturday, March 3, 2001, at 8 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   00-092    02/27/2001   Curtis
Brown adopts an ‘early decision' admission policy for early applicants
After discussions with the Brown Corporation Saturday (Saturday, Feb. 24, 2001), Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein announced her decision to change the University's non-binding "early action" admission option. Beginning with the Class of 2006, students who apply for early admission must agree to make a binding decision on Brown's offer of admission.
News Release   00-088    02/24/2001   Nickel
Brown Corporation approves 3.6 percent increase in total charges
The Corporation of Brown University has approved an overall increase in undergraduate charges of 3.6 percent for the 2001-02 academic year, bringing the cost of a year at Brown to $34,750. That figure includes a 3.8-percent increase in tuition, to $26,568.
News Release   00-089    02/24/2001   Nickel
Inquiring Minds: Enrico Spolaore on the blackouts in California
Inquiring mind: Enrico Spolaore, assistant professor of economics and political science, responds to questions about the California blackouts.
GSJ Story   25GSJ18a    02/23/2001   Cole
Making waves in turbulence studies
Applied mathematics professor George Karniadakis has demonstrated a method to make surfaces more slippery, which has potential applications for any flowing fluid, from water past a ship, oil in a pipeline, and air against an aircraft. He is working with Kenneth Breuer of engineering.
GSJ Story   25GSJ18c    02/23/2001   Kerlin
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your earrings
Even the ancients were slaves to fashion, classics scholar Jeri DeBrohun notes. She's writing a book on fashions from 600 B.C. to the fourth century A.D.
GSJ Story   25GSJ18e    02/23/2001   Curtis
Brown's black history: Rhett Jones and Karen McLauren-Chesson on the 1970s
What it was like to be a black student at Brown during 1970s. Interviews with Rhett Jones and Karen McLauren-Chesson
GSJ Story   25GSJ18f    02/23/2001   Curtis
Teen-agers take seats at state capitols in ‘laboratory for democracy'
High school students from Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nebraska, North Carolina and Rhode Island will debate environment, immigration, trade and other U.S. foreign policy issues at their state capitols. The students are studying and debating these issues in classrooms as part of the Capitol Forum on America's Future sponsored by Brown University.
News Release   00-086    02/22/2001   Kerlin
Researchers to develop brain monitoring system for Mars exploration
Brown researchers received a three-year, $638,000 grant from the National Space Biomedical Research Institute to develop a system to monitor astronauts' cognitive abilities, decision-making and language comprehension during prolonged space missions.
News Release   00-083    02/20/2001   Cole
Op-Ed: Powell may reverse hard times at the State Department
Since the 1950s the State Department has been a hard sell to Congress, and more than a few presidents have ignored the department's counsel. It may take a figure with the gravi-tas – and popularity – of Colin Powell to make the case to Congress for more funds and personnel and to help the State Department win back its influence with the president.
News Release   00-085    02/20/2001   Kerlin
Op-Ed: Remembering and admiring two hard-working black men
All black men are not drug addicts, pimps or gang members. Work such as that about to be published in The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science demonstrates this. But that's not the way I think of black men anyway. I think of them as mostly being shrewd, supportive, sensible, hard-working men like Granddad and Dad.
News Release   00-082    02/16/2001   Kerlin
Lowry to headline 21st annual Brown/Providence Journal conference
The 21st annual Brown University/Providence Journal conference, "The Dignity of Children," will be presented March 4-10, 2001. Award-winning children's author Lois Lowry '58 ("The Giver") will deliver the keynote address for the conference on Sunday, March 4, at 4 p.m. in the Richard and Edna Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   00-081    02/14/2001   Curtis
Providence residents say public schools are moving in right direction
Providence residents give public schools mixed marks but approve their general direction, according to a survey conducted Feb. 3-6, 2001, at Brown University. Sixty-one percent of residents rate Mayor Vincent A. Cianci Jr.'s job performance excellent or good. Survey participants cite crime, ethics and corruption, violence and education as the most impor-tant problems facing the city.
News Release   00-080    02/13/2001   Nickel
Brown to present French Film Festival Feb. 22 through March 4
Brown will offer its annual French Film Festival Feb. 22 through March 4, 2001, at the Cable Car Cinema, 204 South Main St. in Providence. More than 20 French language films and four roundtable discussions will be presented during the festival, which is open to the public.
News Release   00-079    02/09/2001   Curtis
Brown's Black History: Beatrice Minkins ‘36
Brown's Black History: Beatrice Minkins '36: 'Papa thought that education is the one thing no one could take from you'
GSJ Story   25GSJ17c    02/09/2001   Cole
Brown's black history: Augustus White III '57
Brown's Black History: Interview with Augustus White III '57: ‘There was lots of give and take between individual students. People had friendships, but there was no institutional identity'
GSJ Story   25GSJ17d    02/09/2001   Nickel
How do humans derive 3-D images from 2-D projections?
Domini, assistant professor of cognitive and linguistic sciences, investigates how velocity influences the way the human brain derives the three-dimensional structure of objects such as those moving past the train window.
GSJ Story   25GSJ17e    02/09/2001   Cole
Senior takes to the director's chair in Showcase production of 'Venus'
Maria Goyanes is center stage, directing this year's offering in the theater department's Senior Director Showcase
GSJ Story   25GSJ17f    02/09/2001   Curtis
Brown receives exceptional collection of skin disease teaching slides
Brown received some of the best microscope slides in existence for the teaching and evaluation of skin diseases. They are contained in a set of 2,000 original glass slides collected and catalogued painstakingly by two dermatologists over seven decades.
GSJ Story   25GSJ17i    02/09/2001   Turner
Op-Ed: School reform plans should include urban school districts
With heavy reliance on rewards and punishments, the Bush educational reform plan seems to imply that incentives alone will encourage schools to lift themselves out of failure. The plan pays scant attention to the one institution that can make sure there are good schools for all students: the urban school district.
News Release   00-077    02/06/2001   Kerlin
Ken Burns' Jazz succeeds as a documentary
In the unsteady state of American race relations today it would be all too easy to believe, as a small number of white jazz players and critics maintain, that the African American culture and African American musicians have not provided the major sources and shapes of the jazz art form. Ken Burns' documentary firmly represents the truth of African American creativity that we all need to acknowledge – and not rationalize away or forget.
News Release   00-078    02/06/2001   Kerlin
Off hours: Cheng-Chieh Chuang, physician, watercolorist
Off hours: Cheng-Chieh Chuang, physician, watercolorist
GSJ Story   25GSJ16a    02/02/2001   Turner
Someone to watch over them
A team of Brown researchers and colleagues at the Miriam Hospital reach out to help HIV-infected patients stick to their daily medical treatment. Their efforts are made possible through the National Institute on Drug Abuse to expand a program called directly observed therapy.
GSJ Story   25GSJ16b    02/02/2001   Turner
Training and Development launches Mentoring Program for Managers
"Mentoring Program for Managers" is formally introduced.
GSJ Story   25GSJ16c    02/02/2001   Rose
Brown University celebrates annual Years of Service Awards
Sixteen Brown employees will receive special honors for their 25 years of service to the University at a campus ceremony Feb. 14: Manuel Medeiros; Susan Danforth; Patricia Alves; Karen Hyman; Thomas Wunderlich; Richard Patenaude; Sandra Kunz; Genevieve Pari; Nicholas Golato; Gisela Belton; Karen Chapman; Donna Corcoran; Maria D'Onofrio; Debra Nelson; Maureen Byrne; and Donna Hustler.
News Release   00-075    02/01/2001   Sweeney
Kosovo, Milosevic era are topics for Watson Institute lecture series
Author Michael Ignatieff will speak on "Virtual War: Kosovo and Beyond" on Wednesday, Feb. 14, and historians Misha Glenny and Aleksa Djilas will discuss "The Downfall of Milosevic" on Wednesday, March 14. The lectures are part of the Watson Institute's Directors Series on Contemporary International Affairs.
News Release   00-076    02/01/2001   Kerlin
L.A. mayor, R.I. superintendent to discuss future of urban schools
Los Angeles Mayor Richard J. Riordan and Providence Schools Superintendent Diana Lam will participate in a conference titled "The Future of Urban Schools" on Feb. 15–16, 2001, in Sayles Hall on The College Green. The conference is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-074    01/30/2001   Cole
Brown physician helps Egyptian children
Tony Caldemone, M.D. headed a six-member team of medical specialists, which spent nine days sharing their medical experience and techniques with Egyptian counterparts. The November trip was the latest in a series of missions by medical workers nationwide under the organization Physicians for Peace.
GSJ Story   25GSJ15a    01/26/2001   Turner
Inquiring Minds: Warren Simmons on student testing
Inquiring Minds: Warren Simmons on student testing
GSJ Story   25GSJ15b    01/26/2001   Cole
Artist links painful pasts of Vietnam and America
Artist Aimee Pickett '01 links painful pasts of Vietnam and America in an exhibition on display at the Watson Institute.
GSJ Story   25GSJ15d    01/26/2001   Kerlin
Theater, science, history merge in physics course
Leon Cooper and three others will be teaching a physics class using the play "Copenhagen," about Bohr and Heisenberg. Trinity Rep actors will also participate.
GSJ Story   25GSJ15k    01/26/2001   Kerlin
Winner named in Brown/Providence Journal photography contest
Patricia Harrington of Naperville, Ill., has been named the winner in the photography contest sponsored by Brown University and The Providence Journal. Her photo best illustrated "The Dignity of Children," the theme of the 21st annual Brown University / Providence Journal Public Affairs Conference, scheduled for March 4-10, 2001.
News Release   00-072    01/25/2001   Curtis
Artists mix fact and fantasy in "False Witness" exhibition at Bell Gallery
A new exhibition at the David Winton Bell Gallery will leave viewers wondering if they can believe their own eyes. "False Witness: Installations by Joan Fontcuberta and Kahn/Selesnick" opens Jan. 27 and continues through March 11, 2001.
News Release   00-070    01/17/2001   Curtis
Jane E. Smith to give Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture Jan. 29
Jane E. Smith, president and CEO of the National Council of Negro Women, Inc., will speak on "Interchangeable Experiences: Building America in a New Century" on Monday, Jan. 29, 2001 at 7 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. This is Brown's sixth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture, and it is free and open to the public.
News Release   00-068    01/12/2001   Curtis
Iranian women's situation has improved under Islamic Republic
The average marriage age for Iranian women before the 1979 Islamic revolution was 18; it is 21 today. Education for women is obligatory and universal. More than 75 percent of Iranians are under 25. For this population, literacy for men and women is well over 90 percent even in rural areas. University enrollment is nearly equal for men and women.
News Release   00-067    01/11/2001   Kerlin
Op-Ed: The United States has its own record of atrocities
The United States still refuses to practice what it preaches. As supreme Cold War victor, its representatives lecture others about human rights without stopping to consider their own past crimes. For both moral and political reasons, the United States should create a commission to investigate its own involvement in Cold War misdeeds.
News Release   00-065    01/05/2001   Kerlin
John Carter Brown Library to host early New England map exhibition
The John Carter Brown Library will host an exhibition spotlighting historic maps of New England to coincide with its publication of a new reference book, "New England in Early Printed Maps, 1513-1800: An Illustrated Carto-Bibliography."
News Release   00-066    01/05/2001   Curtis
RI computer ownership doubles since 1994 but trails New England, U.S
Researchers at Brown University used census data to study patterns of computer and Internet usage. Among the conclusions: Rhode Island lags behind New England and the nation in computer usage. The study also showed wide variations in computer ownership by income, education, sex, age and race.
News Release   00-064    01/04/2001   Nickel
Op-Ed:Can reliving history teach and change us?
The family who volunteered to live in "The 1940 House" have found themselves changed by the experience, differently from their prior expectations. This sounds like the mark of education: that it produces positive changes in oneself to carry forward in life. Can immersion in history, even if vicariously shared, teach us effectively?
News Release   00-063    12/15/2000   Kerlin
Op-Ed: The American social drama
Nothing could prove the existence of American culture more clearly than the recent presidential controversy and its resolution with the concession speech of Al Gore, and the reconciliation speech of George W. Bush, writes William O. Beeman. With these two events, the United States has gone through a textbook cultural process that anthropologists call a "social drama." In this process, members of a culture deal with a crisis by reasserting social institutions and cultural values.
News Release   00-062    12/14/2000   Kerlin
Digging up dirt on a rare flower
Ailene Kane, a senior environmental science concentrator, is writing a plan to protect and manage an increasingly rare wildflower called northern blazing star
GSJ Story   25GSJ14b    12/08/2000   Turner
Researchers examine Harvard Pilgrim closing
A year-long project will investigate how patients and physicians have fared in the wake of the bankruptcy of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care
GSJ Story   25GSJ14e    12/08/2000   Turner
Juniors get early start on securing off-campus housing
Juniors get an early start on securing next year's off-campus housing. They frequently have a sense of urgency that sends them knocking on doors of privately owned housing nearly a year before they'll be moving in
GSJ Story   25GSJ14i    12/08/2000   Cole
Brown and Providence Journal to sponsor photography contest
The Providence Journal and Brown University are sponsoring a contest to find a photo to illustrate "The Dignity of Children," the theme of this year's Providence Journal/Brown University Public Affairs Conference. The winner will receive a $500 cash award. All entries must be postmarked by Dec. 13, 2000.
News Release   00-061    12/07/2000   Curtis
Astroid named for geosciences researcher
Asteroid named for geosciences researcher Takahiro Hiroi in recognition of his contributions in linking asteroids and meteorites using reflectance spectroscopy.
GSJ Story   25GSJ13b    12/01/2000   Kerlin
Arab, Jewish students finding common ground
Arab-Jewish Dialogue is a student group organized to help members of each group find common ground. It began with friendship building, which has sustained the group through some heated political discussions
GSJ Story   25GSJ13d    12/01/2000   Kerlin
Inquiring Minds: Gordon Wood on the Electoral College
Inquiring Minds -- Gordon Wood on the Electoral College
GSJ Story   25GSJ13e    12/01/2000   Cole
Brown, CareLink form research, teaching collaborative
To collaborate on research and teaching related to improving care for seniors, the Medical School's Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research and Division of Geriatrics have signed a two-year association agreement with CareLink
GSJ Story   25GSJ13i    12/01/2000   Turner
Fall presentations prepare ACUP for budget discussions
Fall presentations prepare ACUP for budget discussions on Dec. 4 . Administrators' proposals total millions of dollars; members must begin to choose which will gain priority status
GSJ Story   25GSJ13j    12/01/2000   Sweeney
Ralph Nader to speak about democracy and big business Dec. 3
Former Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader will be the guest of the Brown Lecture Board at 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 3, 2000, when he will discuss Democracy, Big Business and the American Duopoly in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   00-060    11/30/2000   Curtis
Today's entertainment descends from minstrel shows
The question of whether today's audiences would enjoy Spike Lee's fictional "New Millennium Minstrels" remains an open one. My research into a particularly shameful form of minstrelsy – shows presented by white amateurs – supports Lee's view that the racist stereotypes of minstrel shows have been an integral part of American culture up to the present day.
News Release   00-059    11/29/2000   Kerlin
Brown-led study to examine consequences of Harvard Pilgrim closing
A one-year project led by Brown researchers will survey 1,200 patients and 500 physicians to document the health care consequences of the bankruptcy and closure of Harvard-Pilgrim Health Care of New England, the Rhode Island subsidiary of Boston-based Harvard Pilgrim Health Care.
News Release   00-055    11/27/2000   Turner
Poet Carolyn Forché to discuss The Angel of History Dec. 4
Award-winning poet Carolyn Forché, internationally recognized for her writings and work on behalf of human rights and for the preservation of memories from the darkest moments of the 20th century, will read and discuss her most recent collection of poetry. Her presentation, part of the President's Lecture Series, will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 4, 2000, in the Salomon Center for Teaching, located on The College Green.
News Release   00-054    11/21/2000   Curtis
Panel of political scientists to discuss long-term impact of Florida vote
A five-member panel of Brown political scientists will discuss the Florida recount during a forum at noon Monday, Nov. 20, 2000, in Wilson Hall, Room 102. The public is wel-come, and a microphone will be set up for audience questions.
News Release   00-052    11/17/2000   Cole
What it takes to run a college these days
Is University president a doable job anymore? In 1976, here is what presidents Keeney, Heffner, and Wriston had to say. A reprint from the GSJ.
GSJ Story   25GSJ12a    11/17/2000   DeCesare
Inquiring Minds: Stephen Nelson on the moral voice of college presidents
Inquiring Minds: Stephen J. Nelson, research associate in the education department, on the moral voice of college presidents
GSJ Story   25GSJ12b    11/17/2000   Cole
Smith community reflects on ‘Simmons years'
Simmons appointment as the 18th president of Brown stunned some students at Smith, where she had served since 1995. Smith faculty members were aware that Simmons would be an attractive candidate for any of the three Ivy League universities - Brown, Harvard and Princeton - searching for a president.
GSJ Story   25GSJ12e    11/17/2000   Cole
Search for Simmons was ‘exhausting' and ‘exhaustive'
It was an "exhausting and exhaustive" search that led to the Nov. 9 election of the 18th president of Brown. But that work paid off. In the selection of Ruth J. Simmons, "we're convinced we've found the right person," said Professor Mari Jo Buhle, who chaired the Campus Advisory Committee.
GSJ Story   25GSJ12f    11/17/2000   Curtis
Mailboxes brimming since Mail Services began accepting UPS deliveries
Since Mail Services began accepting United Parcel Service deliveries in January, it has been deluged by packages for students, a combination of the usual care packages from family and friends, and Internet orders. As a result, Mail Services is working on a proposal to address the stream of student package deliveries. The biggest need is space.
GSJ Story   25GSJ12g    11/17/2000   Cole
Rites and Reason brings ‘Liliane' to life through research-to-performance menthod
Rites and Reason theater program embraces a research-to-performance concept. Students in the "Research to Performance Method" course this year know author Ntozake Shange's novel, 'Liliane: Resurrection of the Daughter,' and its characters intimately after a semester spent living with both.
GSJ Story   25GSJ12h    11/17/2000   Curtis
Study to look at lifestyle factors influencing the decision to retire
A $726,981 grant from the National Institute on Aging will support economist Robin L. Lumsdaine's study into a variety of non-economic factors influencing the decision to retire.
News Release   00-053    11/16/2000   Cole
St. Luke's Trombone Quartet, Wind Symphony to perform Nov. 17
The acclaimed St. Luke's Trombone Quartet will join the Brown University Wind Symphony and conductor Matthew McGarrell in presenting a free public concert on Friday, Nov. 17, 2000, at 8 p.m. in Grant Recital Hall.
News Release   00-050    11/10/2000   Curtis
Fitness study targets couch potatoes seeking motivation to exercise
Couch potatoes looking for motivation to exercise may consider joining a new study that uses phone calls or letters, pamphlets and other written materials to prod them into adopting and maintaining a regimen of physical activity.
GSJ Story   25GSJ11e    11/10/2000   Turner
Colorful exhibition explores dark side of artificial flowers
Student's exhibition explores the dark side of Victorian artificial flowers
GSJ Story   25GSJ11f    11/10/2000   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Mark Steinbach on shortage of organists nationwide
Inquiring Minds: Mark Steinbach, University organist, comments on reported shortage of organists nationwide
GSJ Story   25GSJ11i    11/10/2000   Curtis
Ruth J. Simmons named 18th president of Brown University
Ruth J. Simmons, currently president of Smith College, has been named 18th president of Brown University. Her appointment was approved unanimously by the Corporation of Brown University during a special session at 1 p.m. today (Thursday, Nov. 9, 2000). Simmons will begin her duties July 1, 2001.
News Release   00-049    11/09/2000   Nickel
Brown unveils David S. Greer, M.D., Professorship in Geriatric Medicine
Richard W. Besdine, M.D., will hold the David S. Greer, M.D., Professorship in Geriatric Medicine. Besdine directs the Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research. Greer is dean of medicine emeritus. More than $1.5 million in gifts to the Brown Medical School and The Miriam Hospital endowed the professorship.
News Release   00-048    11/07/2000   Turner
Building a staff to build Brown's endowment
Brown's endowment grew by 22.3 percent last year. The $237-million increase brought the endowment to a record level of $1.44 billion on June 30. The hiring of Cynthia E. Frost, Brown's new vice president and chief investment officer, is the first step in creating an Investments Office focused on the endowment long-term.
GSJ Story   25GSJ10a    11/03/2000   Cole
Gaining research experience, one call at a time
Sociology students have taken on Computing and Information Services as a client this semester for the chance to survey one of CIS' consumer groups – graduate students. The new course is designed to teach survey research through hands-on experience.
GSJ Story   25GSJ10b    11/03/2000   Cole
Dean of engineering receives top applied mechanics award
Rodney Clifton has been selected by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers to receive the Timoshenko Medal, the society's top award in applied mechanics.
GSJ Story   25GSJ10c    11/03/2000   Kerlin
Inquiring Minds: Darrell West on the presidential election
Inquiring Minds: Darrell West on presidential election.
GSJ Story   25GSJ10e    11/03/2000   Cole
One of Brown's true gems bids goodbye
When Pearl Woolf began working at Brown on St. Patrick's Day 1965, Barnaby Keeney was president and tuition and fees totaled $2,770 a year. The Rock had just opened; the Sci Li was yet to be built. Woolf, an assistant director in Facilities Management, retired from Brown on Oct. 31.
GSJ Story   25GSJ10f    11/03/2000   Sweeney
Author Barry Lopez to speak on social responsibility Nov. 15
National Book Award winner Barry Lopez will present a President's Lecture titled The Writer and Social Responsibility on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2000, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   00-045    11/01/2000   Curtis
In Yugoslavia, now for the hard part
The West should add incentives for Yugoslavia's old guard to cede key posts without fueling nationalist fears. It should offer economic, security and judicial aid conditioned on pro-democracy leadership in key institutions, especially the police, the judiciary and the military. The West should temporarily delay action on Milosevic's war crimes indictment, waiting until Kostunica's allies have consolidated power.
News Release   00-044    10/31/2000   Kerlin
Inquiring Minds: Linda Miller on violence in Middle East
Inquiring Minds: Linda Miller of Watson Institute on violence in Middle East
GSJ Story   25GSJ09a    10/27/2000   Kerlin
Getting from ‘eureka!' to the marketplace
How do Brown faculty members' discoveries get from "eureka!" to the people who need it? They work with the Brown University Research Foundation, a nonprofit corporation formed to hold and license patents and work with companies that could take inventions to market.
GSJ Story   25GSJ09c    10/27/2000   Kerlin
Sponsored research funding reaches record level in FY 2000
In fiscal year 2000, which ended June 30, the University received a record high of $92.7 million for sponsored research. That's close to $12 million more than Brown garnered during the previous fiscal year, continuing a multiyear trend of steady funding increases.
GSJ Story   25GSJ09e    10/27/2000   Turner
AAU letter seeks Senate's support for teaching hospital, med schools
President Blumstein and 40 other university presidents and chancellors signed a letter to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott asking for his support to prevent further reductions in reimbursements to America's teaching hospitals and medical schools.
GSJ Story   25GSJ09f    10/27/2000   Turner
Phil Brown: The Catskills always survive
Novelists, journalists, local residents and many others have forecast the Catskills' decline. But while the resort area is a fragment of its past glory, the Catskills are crawling with all sorts of developments, from casinos to old hotels converted into modest private homes.
News Release   00-041    10/26/2000   Kerlin
Bell Gallery to exhibit Kim Dingle and the Wild Girls Nov. 11
The David Winton Bell Gallery at the List Art Center will present a new exhibition, "Kim Dingle and the Wild Girls," Nov. 11 through Dec. 31, 2000. Dingle will speak about her work during an exhibition preview Nov. 9.
News Release   00-040    10/25/2000   Curtis
MFA student wins award for film
A short film co-written by Stacia Owens, a candidate for a master's of fine arts in creative writing in May, recently received the 2000 Princess Grace Foundation Award in Film. Owens wrote the black comedy "Out of Habit" with Robin Larsen, a student in UCLA's master's of fine arts program. The award includes $10,000 in completion funds.
GSJ Story   25GSJ08a    10/20/2000   Curtis
Inquiring Minds: Robert Coover on e-publishing
Inquiring Minds: Bob Coover on Stephen King, electronic publishing and what Coover and others have been doing for years.
GSJ Story   25GSJ08b    10/20/2000   Curtis
Becoming advocates for themselves can be disabled students' biggest challenge
In college, the responsibility of getting accommodations for a learning disability or handicap is on the student, unlike the K-12 years when parents often are the primary advocate for ensuring their LD child's needs are met. A look at how some Brown students fare.
GSJ Story   25GSJ08c    10/20/2000   Cole
Shelter for girls in Vietnam touched senior at scholarly and personal level
Interest in the economy and culture of the Pacific Rim drew Sarah Olverson '01, left, to Vietnam, but it was her interaction with a group of young women that remains with her.
GSJ Story   25GSJ08f    10/20/2000   flance
Care to contribute to the public discourse?
How can Brown contribute to the public discourse? One forum for sharing ideas and perspectives is the opinion and editorial pages of the nation's daily newspapers. Brown's Op-Ed Service provides a way for the thoughtful arguments of faculty, staff and students to reach those pages.
GSJ Story   25GSJ08g    10/20/2000   Kerlin
Brown researchers use wildcards to develop better way to sequence DNA
Brown computer science professors Franco Preparata and Eliezer Upfal are working on a method to sequence DNA that would be faster and more efficient than the current technique. They are attempting to improve on an alternative method known as sequencing by hybridization by inserting gaps that act as wildcards in DNA probes.
News Release   00-037    10/18/2000   Kerlin
Brown Festival of Contemporary Music debuts Oct. 26-28
Original musical works by students, alumni, faculty and professional composers will be premiŹred during the first Brown Festival of Contemporary Music Thursday, Oct. 26, through Sat., Oct. 28, 2000. Composers Julian Wachner and Thomas Goss will also con-duct master classes.
News Release   00-034    10/16/2000   Curtis
Blumstein seeks campus response to working paper on diversity
President Blumstein is taking the first steps toward creating Brown's vision for diversity by calling for reactions to a working paper she drafted in response to recommendations made last May by the Visiting Committee on Diversity. During the Oct. 3 faculty meeting, Blumstein discussed portions of the working paper, which she said she hopes "will be the impetus for campuswide discussion" about diversity.
GSJ Story   25GSJ07b    10/13/2000   Sweeney
Low-cost access to high-speed communications comes to campus through OSHEAN
A non-profit consortium called OSHEAN works to increase Rhode Island's access to high-speed networking has taken a page from discount stores: buy in bulk at wholesale prices, pass the savings to the members. Brown is a founding member of the consortium.
GSJ Story   25GSJ07d    10/13/2000   Sweeney
Emily Brochin '03, bike roadie extraordinaire
"I'm not a musician, and I thought you'd have to be a 200-pound tatooed male to be a roadie," says Emily Brochin '03, who was looking for a cool summer job. "But I knew I could ride my bike, so - even though it seemed very bizarre - I applied." She spent her summer as a bike roadie for the band Bicycle.
GSJ Story   25GSJ06a    10/06/2000   Curtis
Avocation evolves into a second career
Donna Leveillee works in the Library, helping researchers locate and use electronic sources of demographic, historical and sociological data. But Leveillee has another career – as a nautical anthropologist. She obtained a doctorate from Brown because of her interest in diving and through a fortunate partnership with the anthropology department.
GSJ Story   25GSJ06c    10/06/2000   Rose
Inquiring Minds: Howard Chudacoff on the Olympics
Inquiring Minds: Howard Chudacoff on summer Olympics
GSJ Story   25GSJ06d    10/06/2000   Curtis
Hay exhibition celebrates Beat Generation's Burroughs
The work of the controversial and influential Beat Generation writer William S. Burroughs will be the subject of a new exhibit at the John Hay Library.
GSJ Story   25GSJ06f    10/06/2000   Curtis
NSF awards $7 million to materials and engineering center
The National Science Foundation has awarded $7 million to Brown to continue its Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.
GSJ Story   25GSJ06h    10/06/2000   Kerlin
Robert Reich to speak on ‘Who Cares about Politics?' Oct. 25
Former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich will deliver a Noah Krieger '93 Memorial Lecture titled "Who Cares about Politics?" on Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2000, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   00-033    10/05/2000   Curtis
Two juniors bearing messages of hope are trekking pole to pole
Jessica Casas and Heidi Hausman, both members of the class of 2002, have postpooned their studies to participate in Pole to Pole 2000, a project conceived as a way to initiate environmental and humanitarian projects worldwide.
GSJ Story   25GSJ05c    09/29/2000   DeCesare
Inquiring minds: Wendy Schiller on the women's vote
Inquiring minds: Wendy Schiller on the women's vote
GSJ Story   25GSJ05e    09/29/2000   Cole
Use of contraceptives by teenage girls appears to have increased over past decade
More young American women are using contraceptives than a decade ago, particularly those who attend church regularly and have college-educated parents, according to a new study that examines changes between 1985 and 1995
GSJ Story   25GSJ05f    09/29/2000   Cole
Brown locks in oil prices for winter
Brown has locked in the price it pays for heating oil, which may bode well for Brown's budget if oil prices soar this winter.
GSJ Story   25GSJ05g    09/29/2000   Sweeney
NSF awards Brown $7 million for materials and engineering center
The Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Brown University has been awarded $7 million by the National Science Foundation. Current research at Brown explores the mechanics of materials used in electronic devices and the mechanics of materials with complex microstructures.
News Release   00-030    09/27/2000   Kerlin
John Hay Library to open new William S. Burroughs exhibit Oct. 10
The work of the controversial and influential Beat Generation writer William S. Burroughs will be on exhibit at Brown University's John Hay Library Oct. 10 through Dec. 29, 2000. Robert Jackson, an authority on Burroughs' work, will speak on the writer's legacy Oct. 21.
News Release   00-027    09/22/2000   Curtis
Don Wolfe on the changing nature of computing at Brown
Since his arrival at Brown 15 years ago, Don Wolfe, vice president of computing and information services, has seen an evolution of computing on campus. The George Street Journal's Mark Nickel recently had an opportunity to discuss those changes with Wolfe, who will be retiring from Brown at the end of the academic year.
GSJ Story   25GSJ04a    09/22/2000   Nickel
University offices becoming showcase for students' works of arts
Professor Richard Fishman is promoting the sale of his students' artwork to University departments
GSJ Story   25GSJ04c    09/22/2000   Curtis
Gardner House offers gracious accommodations for VIPs
George Washington may have never slept in Gardner House, but two first ladies have - and so have a host of other American and foreign dignitaries and VIPs.
GSJ Story   25GSJ04d    09/22/2000   Curtis
Lessons you can't get from books
Jill Edwardson '01 spent her junior year studying in Zimbabwe. "I was a white woman based in the black African experience," she says. "I gained more from talking to men and women about their experiences than all the scholarly research I had done at Brown."
GSJ Story   25GSJ04e    09/22/2000   f'lance
Inquiring Minds: David Kertzer on Pope Pius IX
Inquiring Minds: David Kertzer on the beatification of Pope Piux IX
GSJ Story   25GSJ04f    09/22/2000   Curtis
Help wanted at University Food Services
Over the past decade, University Food Services has experienced a decline in student interest in its jobs. To combat the trend, UFS has instituted innovative recruiting tactics to attract students to its work force.
GSJ Story   25GSJ04g    09/22/2000   Cole
Professors developing better way to map DNA
Brown computer science professors Franco Preparata (left) and Eliezer Upfal (right) believe they have found a faster and more efficient way to sequence DNA by improving on an alternate method known as sequencing by hybridization.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03a    09/15/2000   Kerlin
Advancements in fetal medicine lead to new program at Brown
Beginning this semester, the obstetrician-gynecologist and two pediatric surgeons who performed the procedure, the first of its kind in the Northeast, will apply their multidisciplinary approach to medical education through the School of Medicine's new Program in Fetal Medicine.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03b    09/15/2000   Turner
Inquiring minds: Maria Pacheco on bilingual education
Maria Pacheco, director of New England Equity Assistance Center, comments on recent news that two years after Californians voted to end bilingual education, standardized test scores show Spanish-speaking students improving in reading and other subjects.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03e    09/15/2000   Cole
Summering with a medicine man
Supported by a Royce Fellowship, Dai Shizuka '01 spent two months this summer categorizing the plants in a Costa Rican garden. Many of the plants are used for medicinal purposes.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03f    09/15/2000   Turner
Essayist Wright giving voice to Louisiana prisoners
poet-Prof. C.D. Wright won the Dorothea Lange/Paul Taylor prize for her book about inmates in La. prisons, written in collaboration with a documentary photographer.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03g    09/15/2000   Curtis
Faces of Brown: Spencer Haddow, Police and Security
FACES OF BROWN: Officer Spencer Haddow of Police and Security
GSJ Story   25GSJ03h    09/15/2000   P&S
Taubman Center sends e-government a report card
Darrell West and students at the Taubman Center set out to answer that question last summer. They visited 1,813 Web sites operated by federal and state governments and governmental agencies, evaluated each for 27 distinct features features, summarized the best and worst features of each, then tabulated the results. Their conclusion: Government at all levels is not making full and effective use of commonly available information technology.
GSJ Story   25GSJ03i    09/15/2000   Nickel
Web site study finds ‘e-government' far short of potential
Professor Darrell M. West, director of the Taubman Center for Public Policy at Brown Uni-versity, will discuss his study of 1,813 state and federal "e-government" Web sites during a news conference at 1:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 15, 2000, in the National Press Club.
News Release   00-021    09/11/2000   Nickel
Inquiring Minds: Ken Mayer on AIDS conference
Inquiring Minds: Q&A about AIDS with Ken Mayer
GSJ Story   25GSJ02b    09/08/2000   Turner
Tight squeeze in residence halls
By converting some dorm space into triples and six Wriston libraries into rooms for four, the Office of Residential Life finds places for the growing number of students who want to live on campus.
GSJ Story   25GSJ02c    09/08/2000   Nickel
Research notes from annual sociological association meeting
Research findings presented by Brown faculty and students at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association
GSJ Story   25GSJ02i    09/08/2000   
John Carter Brown Library to host exhibit on colonial Brazil
The history of Colonial Brazil, illustrated through a selection of significant printed works from the John Carter Brown Library's collection, will be on display Sept.11 through Dec. 15, 2000.
News Release   00-020    09/06/2000   Curtis
Program teaches business skills to graduate students
Thirty Ph.D. candidates considering careers outside academia enroll in three-week program offered through Career Services, Graduate School
GSJ Story   25GSJ01a    09/01/2000   Curtis
Ivy League football ruling motivates team
Interview with senior tri-captain Drew Inser about the effect the Ivy League ruling prohibiting Brown from defending its football championshop, had on the Brown football team. Inser transferred to Brown when BU ended its football program.
GSJ Story   25GSJ01f    09/01/2000   Cole
Students' fieldwork helps R.I. explore Latino chapters of its history
The neighborhoods of Providence have become classrooms for the students of Deborah Pacini Hernandez. The associate professor of American civilization and 20 students spent the spring semester interviewing the city's Latino residents for Hernandez' course, "Urban Borderlands: Latino Interactions," and as part of an oral history project for the Rhode Island Historical Society. (GSJ of Sept. 1, 2000)
GSJ Story   25GSJ01l    09/01/2000   Curtis
Breast cancer survivors sought for study on walking, self-esteem
At the Center for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine at The Miriam Hospital, researchers are recruiting participants for a study of whether regular exercise helps breast cancer survivors improve their well-being.
GSJ Story   25GSJ01m    09/01/2000   Turner
Inquiring Minds: Steve Hamburg on wildfires in the West
Inquiring Minds: Q&A with Steve Hamburg about wildfires raging in the west.
GSJ Story   25GSJ01n    09/01/2000   Kerlin
Non-whites rate court performance and fairness lower than whites
A survey of 1,724 people who used the Providence Superior Court, District Court, Family Court, and Workers' Compensation Court examined racial and gender differences in views about court performance, fairness, personnel and processes.
News Release   00-016    08/22/2000   Nickel
Johnnie Cochran to speak on "Justice in America" Sept. 7
Famed trial lawyer Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. – known for his defense of such high-profile clients as O.J. Simpson, Michael Jackson and Riddick Bowe – will deliver a John Hazen White Sr. Lecture Thursday, Sept. 7, 2000, in Sayles Hall.
News Release   00-017    08/22/2000   Curtis
Brown summer program trains teachers in world affairs curriculum
Nine teachers from across the country participated in Brown University's Choices for the 21st Century Teaching Fellows Program, a summer institute that provides training in a curriculum designed to engage secondary school students in debate on international public policy issues.
News Release   00-015    08/18/2000   Kerlin
Opening Convocation to welcome 1,420 students in Class of 2004
Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein will officially open the new academic year during the 237th Opening Convocation Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2000, at 11 a.m. on The College Green. Associate Professor of Comparative Literature Meera S. Viswanathan will be the keynote speaker for the ceremony.
News Release   00-014    08/17/2000   Curtis
Brown faculty offers perspectives on the 2000 presidential race
Brown faculty are available to offer perspectives on many issues in the 2000 presidential campaign: the role of television advertising, the influence of special interest groups, the history of American public opinion, and the perspectives of minority groups and young people.
News Release   00-012    08/14/2000   Cole
The Ivy League decision: some questions and answers about Brown football
On Tuesday, August 1, 2000, the Council of Ivy Group Presidents announced its final disposition of a case involving violations of Ivy League athletics rules on the part of Brown University. The final disposition increased the severity of Ivy- and NCAA-approved measures announced earlier and made Brown ineligible to defend its Ivy League Championship in the 2000 season. The following questions and answers address issues in the case.
News Release   00-010    08/09/2000   Nickel
Walter C. Hunter named vice president for administration at Brown
Walter C. Hunter, a labor and employment law partner at Edwards & Angell, has been appointed vice president for administration at Brown. His responsibilities will include human resources, equal employment opportunity and affirmative action, police and security, facilities management, the Brown Bookstore, graphic services, stores operations, construction, real estate and rental properties, and labor relations.
News Release   00-007    08/02/2000   Sweeney
Brown physicist proposes that electron may be split in two
Brown professor of physics and engineering Humphrey Maris proposes that it is possible to split the electron. A paper describing the theory appears in the Aug. 1 Journal of Low Temperature Physics. Maris presented his research at the International Conference on Quantum Fluids and Solids, held in June at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.
News Release   00-009    08/01/2000   Kerlin
Performers to present evening of West African dance and music
Students from Brown's summer session will be joined by a West African drumming troupe for a July 18th performance of West African dance, music and storytelling at Brown's Ashamu Dance Studio.
News Release   00-004    07/14/2000   Curtis
Study finds caregivers often postpone seeking treatment for themselves
A nationwide study of HIV-positive patients led by Michael D. Stein of Brown University found 14 percent of women and 8 percent of men delayed their own medical treatment because they were caring for others.
News Release   00-003    07/10/2000   Cole
How faculty recruit subjects for drug trials
Researchers who need to recruit subjects with particular illnesses go to great lengths to find the right people, even placing ads in newspapers. (The sports section works best, they say.)
GSJ Story   24GSJ29a    07/07/2000   Turner
Off hours: Richard Roe, comic book collector
"It's amazing how the ridiculously mundane can infiltrate culture – and even become iconic," says comic book collector Richard Roe.
GSJ Story   24GSJ29d    07/07/2000   Curtis
Scientists record movement of herpes simplex virus in nerve cell
A team of scientists led by Elaine Bearer of Brown University is the first to observe and record the movement of the herpes simplex virus within a living a nerve cell. The research was performed at Brown and at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., using squid taken from local waters.
News Release   00-001    07/03/2000   Kerlin
Summer Theatre producer to take his final bow
John Lucas -- hailed as a teacher, designer, mentor and friend -- will retire in September after 31 years in Brown's theater department and as longtime producer of Brown Summer Theatre.
GSJ Story   24GSJ28b    06/23/2000   Curtis
Sarah Doyle Women's Center celebrates 25 years, looks ahead
The 25th anniversary of the Sarah Doyle Women's Center has become a time to clarify its mission and services in response to changes in the women's movement.
GSJ Story   24GSJ28c    06/23/2000   Cole
Perspectives on psychotropic drugs and preschoolers
There is an urgent need for more research on psychotropic drug use in very young children, says Henrietta Leonard, M.D., a practicing child and adolescent psychiatrist and a professor of psychiatry and human behavior in the School of Medicine. In fact, no research results support psychotropic drug treatment in preschoolers, she says.
GSJ Story   24GSJ28d    06/23/2000   Turner
Op-Ed: Hafez Assad – a pragmatic dictator
The West has maintained many myths about Hafez Assad, whose son is poised to take over the presidency of Syria after his recent death. Although in the west, Assad was generally seen as a hard-line enemy of Israel, he actually walked a very fine line, balancing support for Palestinians with restraint in attacking Israel. He was also seen as a repressive dictator, but his struggle to modernize the state was met by resistance from religious conservatives.
News Release   99-140    06/12/2000   Kerlin
Study examines Brown's impact on city, state
Visitors to the University spend upward of $3 million a year on lodging, meals, entertainment and other services, according to a new independent study detailing Brown's wide-ranging impact on the local economy. The study is titled "Partners for the 21st Century: Brown University's Economic Contributions to Providence and Rhode Island"
GSJ Story   24GSJ27d    06/09/2000   Cole
Quest for correct answer led Kosterlitz to new definition and Onsager Prize
Physics professor J. Michael Kosterlitz received the 2000 Lars Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society for recognition of a controversial 1973 paper in which he and partner came up with a new definition of an ordered phase of matter.
GSJ Story   24GSJ27f    06/09/2000   Kerlin
Few sips may sink ships, researchers find
A new study led by Damaris Rohsenow finds that low doses of alcohol may impair sailors who are unaware that their skills are diminished. In the study, two to three drinks significantly tarnished the performance of mariners who were adamant that they were not impaired.
GSJ Story   24GSJ27h    06/09/2000   Turner
Last Word: Decriminalize the possession of syringes
Josiah Rich of Brown writes that Rhode Island must decriminalizing the sale and possession of syringes if it hopes to halt the spread of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. In Rhode Island, the majority of these infections are caused by the reuse of contaminated syringes.
GSJ Story   24GSJ27j    06/09/2000   Rich
Brown School of Medicine begins $70-million campaign
The Brown University School of Medicine's $70-million campaign, entitled "Building the Bridge," is designed to build upon the uniqueness of one of the nation's youngest medical schools.
News Release   99-135    06/01/2000   Turner
Corporation of Brown University elects four new trustees
At its May meeting, the Corporation of Brown University elected four new trustees to six-year terms. Richard Barker, Robin Lenhardt, Jonathan Nelson and Daniel O'Connell will serve as members of the University's governing body through 2006.
News Release   99-136    06/01/2000   Nickel
Rose named director of financial aid stewardship, special assignment dean
Dean of Student Life Robin Rose will leave that position July 1, 2000, to become director of financial aid stewardship and dean on special assignment Jean Joyce-Brady, associate dean of student life, will serve as interim dean.
News Release   99-133    05/30/2000   Nickel
Steinfeld '01 on 'brink of life in the arts' after winning national acting award
Ben Steinfeld, a junior concentrating in theater, has won the national Irene Ryan Acting Award from the American College Theater Festival.
GSJ Story   24GSJ26a    05/26/2000   Curtis
Brown will present 10 honorary degrees at Commencement May 29
Honorary degrees will be presented to Xerox scientist John Seely Brown, author and chef Julia Child, geneticist Francis S. Collins, violin teacher Dorothy DeLay, Providence artist Barnaby Evans, the Rev. Gustavo Gutierrez, abstract artist Brice Marden, author David McCullough, Israeli scholar Alice Shalvi and Louis Sullivan, former secretary of Health and Human Services and now president of the Morehouse School of Medicine.
GSJ Story   24GSJ26g    05/26/2000   Sweeney
Bell Gallery exhibit to feature artists' works of illusion
The David Winton Bell Gallery will present a two-person exhibition, Sleight of Hand, featuring works by Holly Laws and Larimer Richards, from June 10 through July 9.
News Release   99-132    05/26/2000   Curtis
Brown will award 10 honorary degrees at Commencement May 29
Honorary degree recipients at Brown University's 232nd Commencement include Xerox scientist John Seely Brown, author and chef Julia Child, geneticist Francis S. Collins, violin teacher Dorothy DeLay, Providence artist Barnaby Evans, the Rev. Gustavo Gutierrez, abstract artist Brice Marden, author David McCullough, Israeli scholar Alice Shalvi and Louis Sullivan, president of the Morehouse School of Medicine.
News Release   99-130    05/24/2000   Sweeney
New study describes Brown's economic impact in Rhode Island
An independent study has measured Brown's economic impact on the R.I. economy at nearly $400 million in 1998 -- 1.4 percent of the gross state product. The study was released during a University ceremony Tuesday, May 23, 2000.
News Release   99-128    05/23/2000   Cole
Cianci Scholar to develop urban garden program for South Providence
Christine Coletta of Warwick, R.I., has been named the 2000 Vincent A. Cianci Jr. Urban Scholar. Coletta will begin a training program about turning vacant lots into urban gardens.
News Release   99-129    05/23/2000   Cole
Updated directory describes Brown's community partnerships
An updated Community Partnership Directory describes more than 220 community service initiatives between the University and community.
News Release   99-131    05/23/2000   Cole
Memory mechanism found at nerve cell connections in the brain
In today's Science, researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Brown University describe machinery at the synapse for the synthesis of new proteins that de-press synaptic strength. Synaptic weakening is thought to be a key process in memory creation and storage.
News Release   99-123    05/18/2000   Turner
Gutierrez, father of liberation theology, to give baccalaureate address
Gustavo Gutierrez, best known for his work, "A Theology of Liberation," and his support for the poor in Latin America, will deliver an address to graduating seniors at Brown's baccalaureate service on Sunday, May 28, 2000, at 1:30 p.m. in the First Baptist Meeting House, simulcast to The College Green.
News Release   99-126    05/18/2000   Kerlin
Feminist Alice Shalvi to deliver Ogden Lecture May 27
Noted scholar and feminist Alice Shalvi will speak on the effects of feminism on Judaic life in Israel and the world beyond as part of the Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lectureship on Saturday, May 27.
News Release   99-127    05/18/2000   Curtis
Drug-psychotherapy combo found highly effective in depression study
The prescription drug Serzone, combined with psychotherapy designed specifically for chronic depression, produced an 85-percent response rate among 681 patients under treatment for chronic forms of major depression. The study appears in the current New England Journal of Medicine.
News Release   99-120    05/17/2000   Turner
WorldCom, Brown announce grants to 20 underserved U.S. communities
WorldCom and Brown University have awarded grants to 20 community-campus partnerships in support of educational technology programs for youth in underserved communities. The $5-million Making a Civic Investment grant program will benefit thousands of K-12 schoolchildren nationwide during the next five years.
News Release   99-119    05/16/2000   Nickel
Surgeon general to discuss nation's health agenda at Commencement
Dr. David Satcher will speak at the Brown University School of Medicine Commencement Convocation Monday, May 29, at 8:45 a.m. in the First Unitarian Church. Eighty-one students will graduate.
News Release   99-121    05/15/2000   Cole
ACUP finalizes spring report, hears need-blind concerns
Included in ACUP's spring report to the president is its recommended distribution of an unallocated $450,000 in the FY01 budget, with $200,000 going toward the University's technology and information infrastructure, $100,000 for the library's acquisition budget, and $150,000 toward graduate student financial aid. During a portion of the meeting, a student group held a silent demonstration in support of a need-blind admissions policy.
GSJ Story   24GSJ25a    05/05/2000   Sweeney
WBRU news team is tuned in to what it takes to win
WBRU was recently named News Station of the Year for Massachusetts and Rhode Island by the Associated Press. For the team of students from a university that doesn't offer a major in broadcast journalism, it's particularly sweet to beat competition from colleges that pride themselves on such programs.
GSJ Story   24GSJ25b    05/05/2000   Curtis
Brown student wins national award for best college actor
Ben Steinfeld '01 has been named the winner of the Irene Ryan Winners' Circle best college actor award in the annual American College Theater Festival in Washington, D.C.
News Release   99-118    05/03/2000   Curtis
GED a distinct advantage for low-skilled white dropouts, study says
Low-skilled white high-school dropouts who pass the GED earn 10 to 19 percent more than those without the GED, according to a nationwide study of 80,000 people published in the spring Quarterly Journal of Economics.
News Release   99-115    05/02/2000   Cole
Two seniors chosen to deliver parting words to Class of 2000
Eirene Donohue of Barrington, R.I., and Joseph Edmonds Jr. of Baltimore, Md., will deliver speeches during Brown's 232nd Commencement, Monday, May 29, 2000, at 10:15 a.m. in the First Baptist Meeting House.
News Release   99-116    05/02/2000   Cole
ACUP takes first pass at setting budget priorities
At their April 24 meeting, members of ACUP begin to determine their recommendations for budget priorities. Rising to the top of the committee's tentative list: information and technology infrastructure, library support and graduate financial aid.
GSJ Story   24GSJ24a    04/28/2000   Sweeney
The undersea world of Jon Witman and students
Jon Witman and two doctoral candidates just returned from South Africa, where he completed sampling a biogeographic region of the world in his study of global patterns of marine species diversity.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23a    04/21/2000   Kerlin
ACUP gets updates about benefits options, Campus Life Task Force
ACUP members at their April 17 meeting hear about possible changes in faculty and staff benefit packages and an update on the Campus Life Task Force work.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23c    04/21/2000   Sweeney
Finding the Words: Tales of life, love and loss
Finding the Words, a Swearer Center program run in partnership with CCRI and Hospice, helps families mourn and illustrates the grieving process to participating students.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23d    04/21/2000   Turner
Off Hours: Richard Gould, aerobatic anthropology professor
Off Hours: Richard Gould, chair of anthropology department who specializes in underwater archaeology, is an aerobatist, piloting gliders and power planes through aerobatic moves.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23e    04/21/2000   Kerlin
The case of three graduate programs and the transformation of Brown
Thomas Kniesche of German Studies responds to an April 7 Last Word on elimination of three graduate programs. With reference to online letters to the editor.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23f    04/21/2000   Kniesche
Hospital opens haven for despondent new moms or moms-to-be
Women & Infants' Day Hospital opened in February through the efforts of Karen Rosene-Montella, M.D., associate professor of medicine and obstetrics and gynecology in the School of Medicine. The facility treats postpartum or pregnant women suffering from a range of psychiatric illnesses including depression, anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder.
GSJ Story   24GSJ23g    04/21/2000   Turner
Applications available for Brown Summer High School, July 5-28
Brown Summer High School is a month-long program of provocative, question-based learning that offers students entering grades 9 through 12 the opportunity to build critical thinking, reading, writing and problem-solving skills. Partly funded by the Brown University Education Department, the program includes 50 educators working in teams to instruct 300 students.
News Release   99-109    04/17/2000   Sweeney
History of American West featured at John Hay Library
The American West will be the featured topic April 27 when historian Ron Tyler discusses his work. Tyler's presentation, at 8 p.m. in the John Hay Library, marks the opening of an exhibition at the library drawn from the Ames Collection of Illustrated Books.
News Release   99-110    04/17/2000   Curtis
Locked-in oil prices, dual fuel system help campus cope with latest hikes
How did Brown cope with the season's rise in heating oil prices? The impact was minimal, because Brown locked in the price it paid last year. In addition, Brown can switch betweel oil-fueled burners or natural gas-fueled burners to take advantage of the cheapest fuel. (GSJ of April 14, 2000)
GSJ Story   24GSJ22b    04/14/2000   Cole
Faculty asked to explore possibilities of distance learning
In the near future, Brown faculty members will need to determine what role they and the University will play in the rapidly expanding world of distance learning, a topic that was discussed at the April 4 faculty meeting.
GSJ Story   24GSJ22c    04/14/2000   Sweeney
Two studies examine role hostility plays in health
Hostility may be hazardous to your health, judging from the results of two recent studies conducted by Brown-affiliated investigators. One study suggests that hostility contributes to heart disease. Another indicates that a hostile personality increases a person's susceptibility to depression.
GSJ Story   24GSJ22e    04/14/2000   Turner
Robert Hass, poet laureate from 1995-97, will present reading May 8
Robert Hass, who as U.S. poet laureate championed the causes of literacy and environ-mentalism from 1995-97, will present a reading on Monday, May 8, at 7 p.m. in Salomon Center. His presentation is part of the President's Lecture Series.
News Release   99-105    04/12/2000   Sweeney
Brown will maintain its membership in FLA and WRC
Brown University will continue its membership in the FLA (Fair Labor Association) and the WRC (Worker Rights Consortium) and will remain productively engaged in issues related to sweatshop conditions in the apparel industry.
News Release   99-108    04/11/2000   Nickel
ACUP examines issues surrounding need-blind admissions
Coverage of April 3 ACUP meeting on new resources, associated program costs, and need-blind admissions.
GSJ Story   24GSJ21a    04/07/2000   Sweeney
'Packrats' makes the case for the importance of anthropology
On April 9, the Haffenreffer Museum opens its first major exhibition in many years. Called "Packrats for Posterity?," it examines the relevance of anthropology museums. It is being curated by graduate student Juliette Rogers.
GSJ Story   24GSJ21c    04/07/2000   Cole
Don't equate closing of three graduate programs with dismissing three great cultures
William Monroe of the University Library writes in support of University cuts of three graduate-level programs: Slavic, German and Italian.
GSJ Story   24GSJ21e    04/07/2000   Monroe
LAST WORD: Don't equate closing of 3 graduate programs with dismissing 3 great cultures
LAST WORD: Don't equate the closing of three graduate programs with dismissing three great cultures, writes William Monroe, head of the University Library's Collections Department.
GSJ Story   24GSJ21e    04/07/2000   Monroe
ACUP hears proposal for improved graduate student financial aid
An annual commitment of $4 million would enable Brown to offer each graduate student in a Ph.D. program five years of financial support, according to a report presented on March 13 to members of the Advisory Committee on University Planning. (In the April 7 paper edition of the GSJ, this article is combined with coverage of ACUP's April 3 meeting about need-blind admissions policies.)
GSJ Story   24GSJ21f    04/07/2000   Sweeney
Reporter Adam Clymer will speak about Kennedy biography April 10
New York Times Washington correspondent Adam Clymer will discuss his recently released biography of Sen. Edward Kennedy at noon Monday, April 10, 2000, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. His talk will be followed by a book-signing.
News Release   99-106    04/05/2000   Sweeney
Putting psychotropic drugs and preschoolers in perspective
Henrietta Leonard, M.D., a practicing child and adolescent psychiatrist, is a professor of psychiatry and human behavior in the Brown University School of Medicine. Leonard has talked and written extensively on scientific and ethical issues in prescribing medications for preschoolers and other children.
News Release   99-104    04/03/2000   Turner
More than 50 colleges will be represented at College Fair July 14
The Ninth Annual Brown University Summer College Fair will be held Friday, July 14, in Sayles Hall. Representatives of more than 50 colleges and universities will be on hand to talk with high school students and their parents from 1:30 until 4:30 p.m.
News Release   99-103    03/29/2000   Sweeney
Campus Advisory Committee on Presidential Selection announced
Brown Interim President Sheila E. Blumstein has announced the membership of the Campus Advisory Committee on the Presidential Selection. That committee, composed of faculty, students and staff, will assist the Brown Corporation in its selection of the University's 18th president.
News Release   99-100    03/28/2000   Nickel
University Disciplinary Council reaches findings in Feb. 21 assault case
After a hearing on March 22, the University Disciplinary Council found that three male students had violated the University's disciplinary code during a Feb. 21 incident in a residence hall. Dean of the College Nancy Dunbar has reviewed the UDC's findings and has affirmed the recommended penalties, which range from sanction to expulsion.
News Release   99-101    03/27/2000   Nickel
Times Supreme Court reporter Linda Greenhouse will lecture April 12
Linda Greenhouse, who covers the U.S. Supreme Court for The New York Times, will present "Telling the Court's Story: The Role of Courts as Communicators" at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in Sayles Hall. The presentation is this year's Meiklejohn Lecture.
News Release   99-102    03/27/2000   Sweeney
Frances Mayes, author of Under the Tuscan Sun, will speak April 20
Frances Mayes, poet and author of the best-selling memoirs Under the Tuscan Sun: At Home in Italy and Bella Tuscany, will present a lecture titled "Finding the Rhythm of a Memoir" April 20, 2000, at 7 p.m. Her lecture is part of the President's Lecture Series.
News Release   99-098    03/23/2000   Sweeney
Brown author examines the lifelong impact of losing a mother
In Motherloss, Lynn Davidman analyzes the impact of losing a mother during childhood. Based on interviews with 60 adults, Davidman provides an understanding of the need to talk about the death of this loved one.
News Release   99-099    03/22/2000   Cole
Middle East scholars participate in Israeli-Palestinian workshop
Scholars from Israeli and Palestinian backgrounds will take part in a workshop April 7 and 8 that will examine the relations between the two sides since the Oslo accord. The workshop, "Oslo and Beyond: Israeli-Palestinian Relations in a New Era," is sponsored by the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown.
News Release   99-097    03/21/2000   Kerlin
Grad students give high marks to academic experience; health care issues a concern
The University's graduate students rate as "very good" their academic experience at Brown, and rate their student life experience as "good." But there is room for improvement in a number of areas, according to the results of a survey conducted by the Office of Institutional Research.
GSJ Story   24GSJ20a    03/17/2000   Sweeney
Faculty unanimously approve expression of thanks to chancellor
Chancellor Stephen Robert has pledged a $5-million gift to the University and, in the course of three weeks, has secured verbal commitments from other friends of Brown that total $30 million. The announcement, made by President Sheila Blumstein at the March 7 faculty meeting, was met with prolonged applause and a unanimous vote of appreciation for Robert's efforts.
GSJ Story   24GSJ20b    03/17/2000   Sweeney
Faculty explore other cultures through Fulbright grants
The adventure of international travel and the opportunity to teach - and be taught by - students and educators of another culture are the benefits of receiving a Fulbright scholar grant, say Brown recipients of the grants.
GSJ Story   24GSJ20c    03/17/2000   Kerlin
Reed, Feingold to speak on citizen participation in politics
Ralph Reed, a presidential campaign advisor to Gov. George Bush, and Sen. Russell Fein-gold (D-Wis.) are among speakers during a three-day program entitled "Participatory Citi-zenship: First Steps into Politics." Reed will speak Thursday, March 16, and Feingold will speak Friday, March 17, both at 7 p.m. in Sayles Hall. All events of the three-day program, sponsored by the Robert Values Initiative, are free and open to the public.
News Release   99-096    03/15/2000   Cole
Poet/dramatist Amiri Baraka will read from his works April 6
Amiri Baraka, who gained prominence as an influential Beat poet and a leader in the black arts movement, will present a reading of his works on April 6 as part of the President's Lecture Series. He will be accompanied by Blue Ark, a six-person jazz ensemble.
News Release   99-094    03/13/2000   Sweeney
Five college students receive national honors for community service
Five U.S. college students will receive the Howard R. Swearer Student Humanitarian Award Thursday, March 16, 2000, in recognition of their commitment to public service and service learning.
News Release   99-095    03/13/2000   Nickel
From Tiananmen Square to Providence, in poetry
Dissident poet Xue Di came to Brown in 1989 after the Tienanmen Square uprising in China. He has remained since then through the University's Freedom to Write program.
GSJ Story   24GSJ19a    03/10/2000   Kerlin
Science Library sees red over rising journal prices
In an effort to draw attention to the rising costs of subscriptions for scientific journals, the Science Library has hung red tags from science and medical journals with annual subscription rates of $1,000 or more.
GSJ Story   24GSJ19c    03/10/2000   Turner
Venezuelan ambassador to speak at opening of Bolivar collection
The Venezuelan ambassador to the United States will give an address March 12 to celebrate the unveiling of a collection of manuscripts and memorabilia pertaining to Latin American independence leader Simon Bolivar. The new Bromsen-Bolivar Room at the John Carter Brown Library holds the largest collection of Bolivar manuscripts, engravings, and paintings outside of Latin America.
News Release   99-091    03/08/2000   Kerlin
Brown and Providence Journal present symposium on health care crisis
Brown University, the Brown University School of Medicine and the Providence Journal will convene a day-long symposium on the current health care crisis Friday, March 24, 2000, at 8:30 a.m. in Sayles Hall, located on The College Green.
News Release   99-092    03/08/2000   Nickel
Medical school to hold white coat and Match Day ceremonies
Brown medical students will receive white coats, symbolic of their entry into the medical profession, during ceremonies at 3 p.m. Saturday, March 11. At noon on Thursday, March 16, fourth-year medical students will receive their residency placements. Both events are open to the press.
News Release   99-093    03/08/2000   Turner
Faces of Brown: Drew Yerich, executive chef, Faculty Club
Faces of Brown: Drew Yerich, the chief chef at Faculty Club.
GSJ Story   24GSJ18f    03/03/2000   Poole
Brown team receives DOD grant aimed at speeding up electrons
Three Brown professors of engineering and physics and researchers from three other institutions receive $4-million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct research into the action of atomic-level materials that may someday make using the Internet faster
GSJ Story   24GSJ18h    03/03/2000   Kerlin
Novelist William Styron to discuss depression and recovery
Novelist William Styron will present "Darkness Visible: The Loss and Recovery of Self" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, 2000, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Styron's address is the 2000 Harriet W. Sheridan Literature and Medicine Lecture. The event is free and open to the public.
News Release   99-088    03/02/2000   Turner
Barry Lester: Fate of drug-exposed infants and mothers rests in Supreme Court
The high court has decided to hear a case that could determine how society views pregnant women who use drugs and their babies. The problem of drug use by pregnant women is real, but it is not a criminal problem, writes Barry Lester. It is a mental health problem that can be treated. Criminalizing these women's actions will only further the stigma they face.
News Release   99-089    03/02/2000   Sweeney
Defense Department awards $4-million grant to Brown research center
The Defense Department has awarded a $4-million grant to researchers from Brown, who will collaborate with scientists from three other universities. The researchers in engineer-ing, physics, and materials science will explore the action of atomic-level materials that may someday make using the Internet faster.
News Release   99-090    03/02/2000   Kerlin
Chancellor announces membership of Presidential Selection Committee
Brown University Chancellor Stephen Robert has announced the membership of the Presidential Selection Committee, which will identify and hire the University's 18th president. That committee, composed of trustees and fellows, will be assisted by a 13-member Campus Advisory Committee of students, faculty and staff, to be appointed during March.
News Release   99-085    02/26/2000   Nickel
Barry Scheck and other defenders of the wrongly convicted to speak
Nationally known attorneys Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld and journalist Jim Dwyer will talk about miscarriages of justice and their new book, "Actual Innocence: Five Days to Execution and Other Dispatches from the Wrongly Convicted," on March 23, part of the President's Lecture Series.
News Release   99-086    02/26/2000   Kerlin
ACUP looks ahead to spring priorities
ACUP meeting Feb. 14 looks ahead to spring semester priorities, which may include the capital budget and capital projects, need-blind admissions and graduate financial aid, campus life initiatives, and new revenue sources.
GSJ Story   24GSJ17a    02/25/2000   Sweeney
Bringing home baby from far away: International Adoption Clinic
International Adoption Clinic opened by Boris Skurkovich, M.D., at Hasbro Children's Hospital offers medical insight for parents pursuing international adoption.
GSJ Story   24GSJ17b    02/25/2000   Turner
Civil rights leader speaks at Brown
Celebration of Community luncheon keynote speaker is civil rights leader Bernard Lafayette, who traced the history of harm toward African Americans and how he devoted his life toward working for justice using methods of nonviolence.
GSJ Story   24GSJ17c    02/25/2000   Kerlin
McCain leads Gore among R.I. voters; Gore leads Bradley and Bush
Sen. John McCain draws more support among Rhode Island voters than either Democratic presidential candidate, according to a new survey of 327 Rhode Island voters conducted Feb. 19-21, 2000. The survey also finds Sen. Lincoln Chafee ahead in his Senate race and Rep. Robert Weygand leading Richard Licht in the race for the Democratic Senate nomination. Many voters see racial tension as a big problem in Rhode Island and are less optimistic about the state's economy.
News Release   99-083    02/23/2000   Nickel
Students will go to state capitols for lively debates on U.S. policy
High school students from Illinois, Nebraska, Connecticut and Rhode Island will visit their state capitols this spring to debate environment, immigration, trade and other U.S. foreign policy issues. The students are studying and debating these issues in classrooms as part of the Capitol Forum on America's Future sponsored by Brown University.
News Release   99-082    02/21/2000   Kerlin
Brown Jazz Band to perform with trombonist Carl Fontana Feb. 26
Renowned trombonist Carl Fontana and the Joe Coccia Trombone Choir will join the Brown University Jazz Band for the 13th annual Eric Adam Brudner '84 Memorial Concert at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 26, 2000, in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   99-080    02/17/2000   Nickel
Abraham Lincoln, George Washington and their special ties to Brown
Brown has historic ties to Presidents Lincoln and Washington through special collections and historic visits.
GSJ Story   24GSJ16c    02/11/2000   Poole
Study finds host of sleep-related problems among school-age kids
A higher-than-expected percentage of children may have sleep disorders, suggests a new study by Judith Owens, M.D., and other Brown University researchers. The findings are reported in the February 2000 issue of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
News Release   99-073    02/11/2000   Turner
Brown Corporation names Sheila Blumstein as interim president
Sheila E. Blumstein, a former dean of the College and former interim provost, has been named interim president of Brown University. Blumstein will begin serving immediately and will continue until Brown's 18th president is sworn in.
News Release   99-078    02/09/2000   Nickel
President Gee resigns, will become chancellor of Vanderbilt University
E. Gordon Gee, 17th president of Brown University, has resigned as president and accepted an appointment as chancellor of Vanderbilt University. He will leave Brown April 15, 2000, and begin his work at Vanderbilt August 1.
News Release   99-077    02/07/2000   Nickel
Sheridan Awards honor Borts, Waage, Goodwillie for contributions to teaching
Borts, Goodwillie and Waage receive Sheridan Teaching Awards
GSJ Story   24GSJ15e    02/04/2000   Sweeney
Report says physician volunteerism expands care for uninsured
A new report shows that given the opportunity, physicians are willing and eager to play a role in helping the uninsured.The document summarizes Reach Out, a program directed by H. Denman Scott of the School of Medicine.
GSJ Story   24GSJ15f    02/04/2000   Turner
Well Being rises from student interest in community health
The Well Being is a newsletter written by students about health. Students facilitate focus groups to identify topics of interest and concern to community members. Past newsletters have focused on HIV/AIDS, alternative health, and cancer. Students work with community members to write, edt and design the newsletter.
GSJ Story   24GSJ15h    02/04/2000   Kerlin
Halberstam will open annual Brown/Journal Public Affairs Conference
The 20th annual Brown University/Providence JournalPublic Affairs Conference, "Sport: Is It Only a Game?", opens Sunday, Feb. 27, 2000, with a 4 p.m. keynote address by David Halberstam. The conference, which runs through Friday, March 3, features Lombardi biographer David Maraniss and sports commentators Frank Deford, Chris Berman and Dick Schaap.
News Release   99-076    02/04/2000   Sweeney
CBS News president to discuss broadcast journalism with President Gee
Andrew Heyward, president of CBS News, will visit the Brown campus Thursday evening, February 17, 2000, for a "Conversation on College Hill" with Brown President E. Gordon Gee. Gee and Heyward will discuss issues in contemporary broadcast journalism and will respond to questions from the floor, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in Starr Auditorium (Room 117, MacMillan Hall).
News Release   99-074    02/01/2000   Nickel
Montero's mission: enhancing the quality of campus life for students
Interview with Janina Montero. She comes to Brown to oversee campus life and student life. She will lead a task force that will examine campus life, and will report the task force recommendations to Gee in April
GSJ Story   24GSJ14a    01/28/2000   Kerlin
How Brown learned to stop worrying and love the millennium
Brown's Y2K rollover went off with nary a hitch. Quotes from Ann Oribello praising teamwork of varied departments
GSJ Story   24GSJ14b    01/28/2000   Nickel
Task force makes headway in reducing campus red tape, paperwork
Changes inspired by the red tape reduction committee have drawn praise from many; latest initiative streamlines independent contractor policy, puts forms on Web; spring semester will bring centralized room reservation system and a second town meeting
GSJ Story   24GSJ14c    01/28/2000   Sweeney
Engineering professor discovers Y-shaped nanotubes
Brown engineering and physics Professor Jingming Xu has created the Y-junction carbon nanotube, a collection of carbon atoms that could change the course of electronics and computers and someday the repair of the human body.
GSJ Story   24GSJ14d    01/28/2000   Kerlin
Students' engineering startups pursue products with local companies
An entrepreneurship course in engineering is an effort of two professors who wanted to create something to prepare students for real-world experience, such technical marketing and business decision-making, and that would bridge the gap between a truly academic background and industry.
GSJ Story   24GSJ14f    01/28/2000   Turner
R.I. girls to get hands-on science experience at Brown University
About 50 girls will participate in science demonstrations during a Discovery Day at Brown University Jan. 29, 2000, sponsored by the University and the Girl Scouts of Rhode Island.
News Release   99-071    01/19/2000   Kerlin
International panel announces new treatment guidelines for HIV
A 17-member international panel of AIDS/HIV experts has reviewed existing treatment guidelines for people infected with HIV and announced new guidelines. The new guide-lines focus on individualized therapy, a greater choice of treatment regimens, and en-hanced patient adherence to the prescribed treatment regimen. The new guidelines appear in the January 19, 2000, issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.
News Release   99-070    01/18/2000   Turner
Stephen D. Shenfield: Reading between the lines to understand Putin
Russia has a new acting president, but only the barest biographical facts are known about him in the West. Vladimir Putin's writings, however, may offer a few hints to the type of policies he may try to pursue. To judge by a recent essay published under his name, change will be gradual: There are to be no more sharp breaks.
News Release   99-072    01/11/2000   Sweeney
William Julius Wilson will deliver MLK Jr. Lecture Jan. 26
Sociologist William Julius Wilson will discuss "The Bridge over the Racial Divide" when he delivers Brown University's fifth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 26, in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The public is invited.
News Release   99-067    01/04/2000   Sweeney
Contemporary Irish drawings coming to Bell Gallery Jan. 29
The David Winton Bell Gallery in the List Art Center will exhibit A Measured Quietude: Contemporary Irish Drawings beginning Jan. 29. The exhibition will feature nine artists from the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The show continues through March 12.
News Release   99-068    01/04/2000   Nickel
Alcoholics Anonymous founder's archives acquired by Brown
Letters, notes and writings of Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Dr. Robert H. Smith have been acquired by Brown University and will be made available to researchers interested in the origins of 12-step recovery programs. Among the items are Smith's "Big Book" and the coffee pot he used to help himself and others stay sober. Dr. David Lewis, director of Brown's Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, arranged the acquisition.
News Release   99-063    12/28/1999   Kerlin
Brown delivers holiday gifts: a book for every child at Flynn School
On Friday, Dec. 10, members of Brown University's Class of 2000 will present nearly 700 books to pupils at the E. W. Flynn Arts and Technology Academy in Providence and will read aloud in 12 of the classrooms. The senior class public service project is an extension of one begun by the Brown Alumni Association that distributes 2,000 new books to area schoolchildren every year.
News Release   99-061    12/08/1999   Sweeney
Visiting Committee on Diversity returns to campus in January
The Visiting Committee on Diversity will be on campus in January to assess Brown's progress on this issue. This is a Q&A with Augustus White, M.D, who is chairing the committee. With sidebar on the committee members and mission.
GSJ Story   24GSJ13a    12/03/1999   Nickel
Grad students design payload to snare comet dust
Adam Fontecchio and Mike Escuti have created a device to capture comet dust. The payload will be aboard a Viper Rocket to be launched in Charlestown Nov. 18. RI schoolkids will be at the launch. The payload will deploy a capture device and fall back through the Leonid meteors trail, collecting dust and then closing up. After landing, the device will be recovered so that the grad students can analyze any particles.
GSJ Story   24GSJ13c    12/03/1999   Turner
Student director takes 'Artistic License' in latest Brownbrokers production
Behind the scenes of "Artistic License," the latest Brownbrokers production, and interview with director Christopher Hayes
GSJ Story   24GSJ13g    12/03/1999   Hare
Raiola named vice president for alumni relations at Brown University
Lisa J. Raiola, currently director of the medical ethics program and director of strategic planning for southern New England at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, has been named vice president for alumni relations at Brown University. Raiola is a 1984 graduate of Brown (A.B., magna cum laude, biomedical ethics).
News Release   99-059    12/02/1999   Nickel
ER counseling on alcohol helps teens stop drinking/reckless behavior
Teens counseled in the emergency room have fewer subsequent drinking and driving incidents, alcohol-related injuries and other alcohol-related problems than teens who received standard ER care, according to a new Brown study in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.
News Release   99-058    12/01/1999   Turner
New York Times health reporter Jane Brody at Brown Dec. 8
Jane Brody, health columnist and science writer for "The New York Times," will bring her insights to Brown when she delivers the Rothman Forum, "Taking Charge of Your Health," Wednesday, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m. in Sayles Hall.
News Release   99-053    11/23/1999   Kerlin
Latest Brownbrokers production features action-packed drama
The Brown University Brownbrokers present the 64th annual original student musical "Artistic License" Thursday through Monday, Dec. 2-6, 1999, in the Stuart Theatre of the Catherine Bryan Dill Center for the Performing Arts. An action-packed drama, "Artistic License" is set in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.
News Release   99-054    11/23/1999   Hare
Brown professor wins grant for study of weapons bans
Nina Tannenwald, assistant professor at the Watson Institute for International Studies, is studying why some weapons are banned and some aren't. She has been awarded a $73,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
News Release   99-055    11/23/1999   Kerlin
David C. Lewis: Justice for Juveniles
Adolescents with serious behavioral problems are seven times more likely to be dependent on alcohol or illicit drugs, writes Dr. David C. Lewis. But rather than provide them with needed treatment, our policy toward their misbehaviors, however egregious, has become more and more punitive (distributed November 1999).
News Release   99-064    11/23/1999   Sweeney
Barry Lester: Drug-abusing moms and babies – victims of stigma
A pregnant woman's substance abuse problem is not a criminal one. It is a mental health problem that needs to be treated and prevented like any other health problem such as hypertension, says Barry Lester, professor of psychiatry and human behavior. Dismissing the similarities between these two health problems is a symptom of the stigma associated with drug use (distributed November 1999).
News Release   99-065    11/23/1999   Sweeney
FACES of BROWN: Margaret Marisi
Faces of Brown: Margaret Marisi
GSJ Story   24GSJ12d    11/19/1999   Castillo
Lester Feder's summer of blues cast music in new light
Lester Feder 01, a Royce Fellow, was an apprentice to Del Rey, a blues guitarist from Seattle. His project involved doing research on blues history, helping Rey's producer and agent create an album, and taking guitar lessons.
GSJ Story   24GSJ12e    11/19/1999   Hare
For Wells' students, key to literacy was poetry
Interview with Sarah Wells '01, Royce Fellow who created literacy program for second-language learners using poetry as the curriculum.
GSJ Story   24GSJ12f    11/19/1999   Rose
Taking the good news about addiction treatment to the streets
The Brown-based Physician Leadership on National Drug Policy, an advocacy group for a public health approach to addiction treatment, received $1.35 million in grants to build coalitions with community groups and specialists in addiction medicine and primary care.
News Release   99-052    11/18/1999   Turner
Faculty approval of Brain Science program will be sought Dec. 7
An oversight that left faculty out of the approval process for the new Brain Science Program will be rectified in December. Several faculty members raised the oversight with President Gee during the Nov. 2 faculty meeting. Gee and others apologize for the oversight.
GSJ Story   24GSJ11c    11/12/1999   Cole
Increasingly, Brown students are studying abroad
During the past academic year, 478 Brown undergraduates studied abroad through the Office of International Programs.
GSJ Story   24GSJ11d    11/12/1999   Cole
Off Hours: Jill Lawlor, assistant director sharing her passion for opera
Off Hours: Jill Lawlor, assistant director and opera singer who is sharing her passion for the art with others through her work with Beavertail Opera Productions.
GSJ Story   24GSJ11f    11/12/1999   Sweeney
Finding that teachable moment to counsel smokers
Brown researchers receive a grant to pursue teachable moments in the emergency room with patients who arrive w/ heart problems who also smoke.
GSJ Story   24GSJ11g    11/12/1999   Turner
Center for Study of American Civilization helps scholars answer "What's next?"
Center for the Study of American Civilization helps young scholars answer the question "What next?" With a look at the work and research being done by one research fellow in particular, Justin Wolff, whose fellowship was critical for his new publication on corporealism in antibellum visual culture.
GSJ Story   24GSJ11h    11/12/1999   Sweeney
Indian novelist to speak at South Asian Student Association conference
Arundhati Roy, an award-winning Indian novelist, will speak as part of a South Asian Student Association conference at 7 p.m. Friday Nov. 19 at the First Baptist Church in America. She is the author of the best selling book, "The God of Small Things."
News Release   99-050    11/10/1999   Hare
Table for two (thousand) - guest chef program
John O'Shea, executive chef at University Food Services, is starting a Visiting Chefs Program for students on meal plan. Periodically, John will have a renown chef in the industry come to Brown to prepare a meal for the entire student population. The first is John Conte of Raphael Bar Risto
GSJ Story   24GSJ10b    11/05/1999   Cole
Teens learn about living in a material world
The Materials Research Science and Engineering Center is introducing scientific principles to groups of area teen-agers
GSJ Story   24GSJ10d    11/05/1999   Turner
'Passion Play' explores differences between actors, characters they play
Interview with graduate playwriting student Sarah Ruhl, whose "Passion Play" will be performed in Leeds.
GSJ Story   24GSJ10f    11/05/1999   Hare
Wind Symphony concert to feature guest tuba player
Gary Buttery, tubist, will perform with the Brown University Wind Symphony Friday, Nov. 19, at 8 p.m. in Grant Recital Hall. The concert will feature a mix of contemporary and 16th century compositions.
News Release   99-049    11/04/1999   Hare
Cerebral cortex cells may pulse electrical rhythm through the brain
Brown University researchers have shown that some nerve cells in the cerebral cortex use electrical connections to communicate. Scientists had thought nerve cells in the cerebral cortex communicated only through connections that use chemical signals. The new findings appear in the Nov. 4 issue of Nature.
News Release   99-048    11/03/1999   Turner
Kathryn Spoehr named executive vice president and provost
Kathryn T. Spoehr, currently dean of the faculty and interim provost at Brown University, has been named executive vice president and provost, succeeding William S. Simmons.
News Release   99-047    11/02/1999   Nickel
Bottom line for sponsored research grew $14 million in past fiscal year
Research issue: In past year, Brown research funding has experienced a $14 million increase, $10 million of which comes from DHHS/NIH.
GSJ Story   24GSJ09a    10/29/1999   Kerlin
Watson Institute researchers investigate sanctions
Researchers at the Watson Institute are working to improve the effectiveness of U.N. sanctions on countries that violate international norms.
GSJ Story   24GSJ09d    10/29/1999   Kerlin
Providence Place Mall will be a living lab for American Civilization course
The Providence Place Mall will be a living laboratory for an American Civilization course taught by Susan Smulyan.
GSJ Story   24GSJ09f    10/29/1999   Cole
Seafaring Vikings inspired works written for 'Voyages Festival'
Preparations for the Icelandic "Voyages Festival," at which the president of Iceland, who will be delivering an Ogden Lecture around the same time, will be the honored guest.
GSJ Story   24GSJ09h    10/29/1999   Cole
Ruth Bader Ginsburg to discuss women and the Supreme Court
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will discuss "The Supreme Court: A Place for Women" on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 1999, at 4 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. Her presentation is the annual Noah Krieger '93 Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the A. Alfred Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions.
News Release   99-045    10/29/1999   Hare
‘Passion Play' to premiŹre at the Leeds Theatre Nov. 11
Passion Play, a new work by Sarah Ruhl of Brown's Creative Writing Program, will receive its premiŹre in Leeds Theatre of the Catherine Bryan Dill Center for the Performing Arts, with performances Nov. 11-21, 1999. The play takes a provocative look at the offstage lives of actors who are cast in a play about the crucifixion of Christ
News Release   99-046    10/29/1999   Hare
Home exercise equipment increased weight-loss success in study
In a recent study of 115 overweight women, participants with home exercise equipment lost twice as much weight as those without the equipment. The findings were published in the Oct. 27 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
News Release   99-035    10/26/1999   Cole
Conference to examine impact of virtual reality on international affairs
VIRTUALY2K, a three-day conference sponsored by the Watson Institute, will bring more than a dozen economists, military officers, computer scientists, filmmakers, journalists and foreign affairs specialists to Brown Nov. 5-7, 1999. They will seek to understand the current and future impact of digitized and networked technologies on world affairs.
News Release   99-043    10/26/1999   Nickel
JCB Library marks the 200th anniversary of Washington's death
"Washington: The Man, the Facts, the Myth," an exhibition honoring the 200th anniversary of George Washington's death, is on display in the John Carter Brown Library through Jan. 15, 2000. The exhibition's 66 artifacts provide first-hand accounts of one of the most accomplished men of the 18th century.
News Release   99-042    10/25/1999   Hare
Sen. John Chafee was an American hero and a Rhode Island legend
Brown University President E. Gordon Gee today praised the late Sen. John Chafee as an American hero, Rhode Island legend and member of the Brown family, whose exemplary public life featured a "consistently measured approach to finding a solid middle ground on the most contentious of issues."
News Release   99-044    10/25/1999   Nickel
To your health: Taking a look at the medical school's impact on R.I.
This academic year marks the 25th anniversary of the graduation of the first MD class from the School of Medicine. In that time, the medical school has had a profound impact on the University and the health of Rhode Islanders. With information about contributions made during the 25 years; several special lectures.
GSJ Story   24GSJ08a    10/22/1999   Chadwick
Scholars of the spooky and mysterious have plenty of campus resources
Several special collections and courses on campus take a scholarly look at the spooky, the mysterious and the occult.
GSJ Story   24GSJ08b    10/22/1999   Hare
Deepak Chopra presentation to open Asian American History Month
Deepak Chopra, physician, best-selling author and leader in the field of mind-body medicine, will deliver a President's Lecture to open Asian American History Month at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1, 1999, in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   99-040    10/22/1999   Hare
President of Iceland to discuss relations with the northern region
Olafur Ragnar Grimsson, president of Iceland, will deliver a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. Memorial Lecture Thursday, Nov. 4, at 6:30 p.m. in the Salomon Center for Teaching. The lecture is free and open to the public.
News Release   99-036    10/19/1999   Cole
Music Festival celebrates Viking exploration of North
In honor of the 1000th anniversary of Viking exploration of North America, the Brown University Department of Music will host the "Voyages Festival" Nov. 4-6, 1999. The festival will showcase the premiŹre of seven new compositions and a lecture by Olafur Ragnar Grimson, the president of Iceland.
News Release   99-038    10/19/1999   Hare
Brown to remain in Fair Labor Alliance, join Worker Rights Consortium
President E. Gordon Gee announced today that Brown University will maintain its membership in the Fair Labor Association and will become a founding member of a new student-led alternative group, the Worker Rights Consortium. Both FLA and WRC work to end sweatshop exploitation of apparel industry workers and to assure consumers that the items they buy have been manufactured under conditions that respect worker rights.
News Release   99-037    10/18/1999   Nickel
George Soros to deliver inaugural Lee-Gregorian Distinguished Lecture
International financier and philanthropist George Soros will deliver the inaugural Chong Wook Lee and Vartan Gregorian Distinguished Lecture at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20, 1999, in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   99-033    10/14/1999   Nickel
Brown Orchestra to open season with music by Russian composers
The Brown University Orchestra will open its 1999-2000 season performing the works of Russian composers Rachmaninoff and Borodin. Concerts are planned for 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Oct. 22-23, in Sayles Hall.
News Release   99-032    10/12/1999   Hare
Should Brown's Web include ads?
Panel seeks campus reaction Brown is considering what policy to set regarding advertising on its web pages. What will be allowed? At what level? What are the problems that advertising on web raises?
GSJ Story   24GSJ06a    10/08/1999   Cole
Gamelan - Gateway to Javanese culture
Brown has acquired a spectacular set of musical instruments from Indonesia called a gamelan, an orchestra of tuned bronze gongs and metallophones. It takes up an entire classroom, and the be! autifully carved wooden cases, painted crimson and gold, make it visually as well as aurally stunning. Students will be able to learn how to play it for credit.
GSJ Story   24GSJ06b    10/08/1999   Hare
Harvard law professor will put hate crime in Gilbane Lecture spotlight
Q&A with Martha Minow of Harvard Law, who will be presenting three lectures and a symposium on campus Oct. 19, 26, Nov. 2 and Nov. 19, on "Breaking the Cycle of Hatred," which will examine hate crimes and the laws that focus on such crimes.
GSJ Story   24GSJ06c    10/08/1999   Kerlin
Wind Symphony concert to showcase folk tunes from around the world
Folk tunes from around the world will be performed at a special Parents Weekend concert in the Solomon Center for Teaching at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16. The concert will feature compositions inspired by songs from Sweden, Korea, Great Britain and other countries.
News Release   99-029    10/07/1999   Hare
Brain Science Program to be unveiled with faculty research presentations
David Mahoney, one of the world's foremost champions of brain research, will receive an honorary degree from Brown University on Oct. 8, during a ceremony that will feature research presentations by faculty from the University's new Brain Science Program.
News Release   99-026    10/04/1999   Turner
Survey: Undergrads `very satisfied' with overall experiences, less so with sense of community
Results of the Cycles Survey conducted by the Registrar's Office/Office of Institutional Research last May. Students report high levels of satisfaction with their overall experience and academic experience at Brown. Level of satisfaction with sense of community on campus is low, as are satisfaction with food services, advising, dorms
GSJ Story   24GSJ05a    10/01/1999   Sweeney
Will Y2K computer problems bug you?
Interview with Anne Oribello re: Brown's Y2K work. She has some concerns re: lab equipment. To coincide with the one-hour Y2K training sessions on contingency planning being offered to academic and administrative departments.
GSJ Story   24GSJ05b    10/01/1999   Kerlin
Brain science leader to receive honorary degree
Champions of brain research David Mahoney will receive an honorary degree at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8, in Starr Auditorium in a ceremony that will also unveil Brown's new Brain Science Program.
GSJ Story   24GSJ05d    10/01/1999   Turner
Concert to showcase traditional music from the Emerald Isle
The Brown Music Department will feature Joe McKenna, Irish bag piper, and other traditional Irish musicians in concert on Saturday, Oct. 9, at 8 p.m. in Grant Recital Hall.
News Release   99-027    09/30/1999   Hare
New machine may provide answers about leading cause of blindness
A Brown University psychologist has developed an easy-to-use device that measures levels of macular pigment in the human eye. Macular pigmentation correlates with macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the world. One of the primary goals of the macular pigmentation research will be to determine the exact cause-and-effect relationship between the pigment and disease.
News Release   99-025    09/29/1999   Cole
Television at bedtime is associated with sleep difficulties in children
A television in the bedroom is the most powerful predictor of overall sleep disturbances in school-aged children, according to a new study by Dr. Judith Owens, assistant professor of pediatrics in the Brown University School of Medicine.
News Release   99-023    09/27/1999   Cole
Three-story house to leave East Side for South Providence
A blue and gray triple-decker apartment house will be relocated from the East Side to its new location in South Providence beginning at daybreak Sunday, Sept. 26. Traveling at 2 miles per hour, the journey will take an estimated 12-14 hours to complete.
News Release   99-021    09/20/1999   Hare
Gee outlines plans for new $80-million Life Sciences Building
First faculty meeting of the academic year: $80 million to be borrowed to build the Life Sciences Building, a science/research center; series of faculty seminars slated to introduce faculty to new Brown way of doing things by setting priorities and funding only those, borrowing money for campus improvements, etc.
GSJ Story   24GSJ03a    09/17/1999   Cole
FACES of BROWN: Frank Sears, parking manager
Frank Sears, parking manager -- latest in the FACES OF BROWN series.
GSJ Story   24GSJ03c    09/17/1999   Castillo
Oh lighten up! Comedy festival offers antidote to taking ourselves too seriously
Jokes, jugglers, cranks and crackpots will spread a little jocularity during the Brown Comedy Festival. Hosted by the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance, the festival opened Sept. 14 and continues through October.
GSJ Story   24GSJ03d    09/17/1999   Hare
Three judges to discuss justice and affirmative action Sept. 27
Federal Judges Joseph Tauro and Bruce Selya and Rhode Island Superior Court Judge Rogeriee Thompson will share views on affirmative action during "Justice for All: Affirmative Action and the American Ideal," a panel discussion taking place at 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 27, 1999, in Starr Auditorium.
News Release   99-020    09/16/1999   Hare
Brown Bookstore celebrates 30th year doing business on Thayer Street
The Brown Bookstore is marking its 30th anniversary on Thayer Street with readings, book signings, a children's story hour, raffles, door prizes and more Oct. 1-5.
News Release   99-019    09/15/1999   Hare
Brown foreign policy discussion program receives $250,000 grant
Brown's Choices for the 21st Century Education Project has received $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to expand a program of foreign policy discussion at local libraries.
News Release   99-018    09/13/1999   Kerlin
'Hert to Heart' educates women of color about cardiovascular disease
Rites and Reason, with Lifespan and the Heart Association, are producing play about African American women and heart disease. The production will tour the state in September.
GSJ Story   24GSJ02e    09/10/1999   Hare
Florentine art to grace gallery walls when 'Splendor of Florence' comes to Brown
An exhibition featuring painted portraits of the Medici family will open at the David Winton Bell Gallery beginning Sept. 18. The free exhibition, "Crafting the Medici: Patrons and Artisans in Florence, 1537-1737," is made possible by the contributions of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy, which loaned the paintings to the gallery.
GSJ Story   24GSJ02f    09/10/1999   Hare
Sitar and tabla masters to perform at Brown University Sept. 25
Two rising stars of Indian classical music – Krishna Mohan Bhatt, sitar, and Sandip Burman, tabla – will be in concert at 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25, 1999, in the Salomon Center for Teaching.
News Release   99-017    09/10/1999   Hare
Theater department to host Brown Comedy Festival through October
Jokes, jugglers, cranks and crackpots will spread a little jocularity during the Brown Comedy Festival. Hosted by the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance, the festival will showcase silent clown Avner the Eccentric, a production of the French farce A Flea in Her Ear, theater critic John Lahr of the New Yorker, and others. The festival begins Sept. 14, 1999, and continues through October.
News Release   99-015    09/08/1999   Hare
Institutional barriers discourage part-time work as balance to family life
Lack of policies, threats to partnership status, and stigma are among the barriers to part-time work arrangements in radiology, according to a Brown sociologist. These hurdles mainly affect young women seeking to balance work and family.
News Release   99-016    09/08/1999   Cole
Gordon Gee: Democracy and a new declaration from higher education
"Higher education must shoulder some of the blame for the fact that young adults are increasingly disengaged from the democratic process," say Brown President E. Gordon Gee and University if Pennsylvania President Judith Rodin. "A group of college and university presidents recently recommitted their institutions to playing a vital role in rekindling the national democratic spirit."
News Release   99-066    09/07/1999   Sweeney
Princeton dean named vice president for campus life and student services
Princeton dean Janina Montero has been named Brown's new vice president for campus life and student services. She will begin her duties Jan. 3, 2000.
GSJ Story   24GSJ01a    09/03/1999   Turner
Off Hours: Officer Leite preps for Boston-NY AIDS ride
OFF HOURSL Sgt. Tony Leite of Police and Security will be participating in a three-day Boston to New York City bike ride to raise funds for AIDS research. Ride is Sept. 16-18.
GSJ Story   24GSJ01e    09/03/1999   Hare
RIPTA trolleys link College Hill to city highlights
Riding the RIPTA trolley, which serves Brown area and connects downtown and the new mall to campus.
GSJ Story   24GSJ01h    09/03/1999   Hare
Health care, retirement plan, parking top town fair balloting
Results of SAC Town Fair "balloting" held during Staff Development Day.
GSJ Story   24GSJ01i    09/03/1999   SAC
Race: Mississippi Meanings, Illinois Ideas, and Rhode Island Realities
Rhett Jones writes commentary about growing up black in the South and racism that still exists in Rhode Island.
GSJ Story   24GSJ01k    09/03/1999   Jones
15th-century portion of CNN's ‘Millennium' will premiŹre at Brown
Episode five of the CNN presentation Millennium will premiŹre at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30, 1999, in the Starr Auditorium of the MacMillan Science Building. Millennium is a 10-hour documentary series that takes a sweeping look at events, culture and people that have sculpted the world during the past 1,000 years.
News Release   99-014    09/02/1999   Hare
Opening Convocation will welcome 1,381 students to Class of 2003
Internationally-known addiction expert Dr. David C. Lewis will deliver Brown's Opening Convocation address Sept. 7 at 11 a.m. on The College Green. In case of heavy rain, the ceremony will be held at Meehan Auditorium, 235 Hope St.
News Release   99-013    09/01/1999   Cole
New play to educate women of color to risks of heart disease
"Heart to Heart (Ain't Your Life Worth Saving?)," an original drama set in Providence, is designed to educate women of color to the warning signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease. The free touring production will be staged at 11 sites throughout Rhode Island and will include free health screenings for audience members.
News Release   99-012    08/29/1999   Hare
Janina Montero named vice president for campus life, student services
Janina Montero, dean of student life at Princeton University, has been appointed vice president for campus life and student services at Brown University.
News Release   99-011    08/27/1999   Sweeney
Teachers trained in world affairs curriculum at Brown summer program
Twelve teachers from across the country participated in Brown University's Choices Teaching Fellows Program, a summer institute that provides training in a curriculum designed to engage high school students in debate on international public policy issues.
News Release   99-008    08/16/1999   Kerlin
Simmons named senior VP for academic outreach, affiliated programs
Provost William S. Simmons will undertake a new assignment as senior vice president for academic outreach and affiliated programs, effective July 31, 1999. Dean of the Faculty Kathryn Spoehr will serve as interim provost.
News Release   99-005    07/29/1999   Nickel
Many young people with asthma are not taking their prescribed medicine
Young people are not using inhalers prescribed to prevent asthma, and many children and parents know little about their asthma medications, say two studies.
News Release   99-006    07/27/1999   Turner
John F. Kennedy Jr., Brown University Class of 1983
The Brown University family joins all Americans and people around the world in mourning the untimely loss of John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife, Carolyn, and her sister, Lauren Bessette.
News Release   99-004    07/19/1999   Sweeney
Repair of cradleboards is a labor of love
Vanessa Jennings, who restores Native American cradles, comes to the Haffenreffer to refurbish some of the museum's collection before it heads out on a national tour. (GSJ of