2018

Lianne Loc-Ian Cho is an international student from Toronto, Canada.  She will be receiving a Sc.B. (Honors) in Neuroscience and has been nominated to Phi Beta Kappa.  In her time at Brown, Lianne has focused on being a mentor and a voice for change. Through her advocacy and work in creating a stronger network for students she has identified shortcomings, identified ways to improve the work, and then worked on the ground to help it all come to fruition.  Lianne has served as a mentor and then coordinator of the International Mentoring Program.  After a difficult year with many pitfalls, she identified the problems and advocated for increased support for International Students.  She served on the search committee for the inaugural Program Director of International Student Experience and then continued her work in working with the Program Director to ensure she was oriented and supported in its year of implementation. Lianne has also served on the Campus Life Advisory Board and as a Meiklejohn Peer Advisor.  She has been active in the music community since she came to Brown and has participated as part of the Wind Symphony, Orchestra, a Chamber Music ensemble, and in  two pit orchestras.  Lianne will be pursuing her MD/PhD at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, after which she plans to advocate for structural change based on her observations and experiences at various levels of the healthcare system.

 

Maryori Marie Conde is from South Central Los Angeles, California.  She will be be receiving an A.B. in Ethnic Studies.  The themes of her work and contributions at Brown have focused on the Latinx and low-income communities.  Mayori is from a low-income family and is the child of Salvadoran immigrants.  These two aspects of her identity are what have motivated her work.  Maryori has been involved in a variety of ways since her arrival on campus.  She co-founded Latinx House as well as the Central American United Student Association.  She also founded the Latinx Conference which was recognized for its collaboration.  But at the heart of Maryori’s work is her passion to “fight for what she believes in and use her voice and privilege to uplift others” as stated in one of her nominations.  She has been described as “a warm and compassionate woman who embodies hard work and perseverance.”  Her impact has extended beyond campus with her work as a teacher and tutor at Breakthrough Providence as well as through her constant efforts to include the Providence community in the work she engages in on campus.  She has also played for the Brown Women’s Rugby Team while here at Brown. She gives “credit to her mom’s sacrifices and the work of past activists at Brown whose labor continuously gets erased.”  Maryori will be staying at Brown to complete a 5th year MAT program with the aspiration of being a high school U.S. History teacher that serves predominantly low-income, first-gen students of color.

 

Gabriel Reyes is from Albuquerque, New Mexico. He will be receiving his Sc.B. (Honors) in Cognitive Neuroscience. Gabriel has been passionate to improve the experience for marginalized students. Gabriel has been an active member of the New Scientist Collective (NSC), an organization aimed at supporting minorities in science at Brown. He is currently a co-coordinator for the program and during his time involved with NSC he has worked to elevate its presence and implement mechanisms for sustainability. He developed a Mentor-Mentee pairing tool which he was able to implement by  receiving feedback and reaching consensus with the group. Additionally, in his time participating in NSC he has spearheaded several activities such as the NSC Faculty Lunch Dates, NSC Scholars Gala, and the NSC Learning Teams. All these activities were meant to encourage other students to learn how to build relationships with peers and faculty. Gabriel has also served on the Executive Board for QuestBridge where he aimed to foster community for low-income students by leading several events such as a dinner with QuestBridge CEO. He is a leader in the Gates Millennium Scholars Program, has received a Careers in the Common Good grant, served as a head coach and site director for Let’s Get Ready, and worked as a TA for three courses at Brown. After graduation, Gabriel will be working in education and research before pursuing advanced graduate studies in neuroscience and education.

 

Jeanelle Wheeler is from Auburn, Massachusetts.  She is a double concentrator and will  be receiving an A.B. in French & Francophone Studies and an A.B. in Literary Arts and has been nominated to Phi Beta Kappa. Jeanelle has combined her love of languages, the arts, and teaching to work for social justice in both the Brown and Providence community.  Jeanelle served as the Social Justice Coordinator of the Brown-RISD Catholic Community (BRCC),  hosting weekly social justice dinners with activist speakers and facilitating weekly discussions. This led to the creation of Interfaith Justice Dinners and formation of  Multi Faith Organizing for College Hill Activism (MOCHA).  As co-president of the Brown Animal Rights Coalition (BARC), and campus fellow for Mercy for Animals, has led a weekly Difficult Dialogues series and Meatless Monday campaign to promote animal rights and environmentalism.  She is deeply involved  in the music community and has participated in the Wind Symphony, Brown Band, chamber groups, and the Catholic Community choir in addition to Harmonizing Grace Gospel Choir, Javanese Gamelan,  World Music Ensemble and in pit orchestras.   Jeanelle has also been in involved with the Providence community through Dorcas International Institute, Women’s Refugee Care, and in volunteering  at Hope High and Blackstone Academy.  Jeanelle plans to work at Brown as a Summer Leadership Institute Assistant this summer and then will be teaching high school English in France for which she was granted a Fulbright Scholarship.  She will then return to Brown and complete a 5th Year MAT program.

 

Chelse-Amoy Steele is from Atlanta, Georgia. She is a double concentrator and will be receiving an A.B. in Africana Studies and an A.B. in Computer Science. As president of the Undergraduate Council of Students (UCS), Chelse-Amoy has designed and presented a new form for Bias Related Reporting, drove institutionalization of free menstrual products, and collaborated with administration to address issues specific to low-income students as well as around consent and sexual violence prevention. She organized feedback sessions for four new administration hires, managed four internal committees, and hosted weekly General Body meetings to hear feedback on project implementation. In Computer Science, Chelse-Amoy was a leader in making the department a welcoming space for those who are underrepresented in the program. She founded and co-coordinated Mosaic+, an  organization not just representing those who are underrepresented in CS, but also providing support, mentorship, and fellowship. She was able to establish the group as a UCS and CS Department recognized group, obtained space within the CS department for the group and grew the mentorship program by over 50 people. In addition, she has served as the co-coordinator of The Artemis Project, a summer program for underrepresented genders in Computer Science, as the Diversity Advocate for the Computer Science Department, and as a Teaching Assistant for Computer Science and the Mande West African Dance Program.

 

Alex Vidmar is from Aurora, Colorado.  He is a double concentrator and will be receiving an A.B. in Western Esoteric Studies (Independent Concentration) and an A.B. in Renaissance & Early Modern Studies.  Alex has focused for the past four years on committing himself to the service of the Brown community with a mind to advising and counseling. Upon arriving at Brown he started working at the IT Service Center providing technical assistance to the Brown community from applicants to alumni and everyone in between.  He was promoted to manager and led reforms to the office systems increasing the accessibility and efficiency of IT services.  Always looking for opportunities to serve, Alex joined the Student Conduct Board and went on to be the founding member of their Student Ambassador Program. Through this program, he has promoted outreach about Brown's code and guided students through the conduct process and served as a leader in creating the mission and focus of the program. He served on the Independent Concentrations sub committee of the College Curriculum Council and  has also worked with students to advise them as they crafted their own curricula.  In Providence he has  has run tabulations for the Rhode Island Urban Debate League (RIUDL) and created a sustainable tabulating system.  He also coaches high-school students in debate and has won awards for being the top Coach Assistant at tournaments.  This summer Alex will be teaching English in Japan with an emphasis on public speaking and thinking through their life’s mission.  Upon his return he will work as a Campus Organizer in Hartford, CT to help facilitate public interest campaigns headed by college students.

 

Adrija K. Darsha is from Fremont, California. She is receiving an Sc.B. in Biology (Immunobiology).  Her love of science has led to her desire to increase the accessibility and inclusiveness of science in its many forms. Her leadership style is highly collaborative and “inspires enthusiasm from her team while focusing on uplifting members from various backgrounds.” As the lead coordinator for the Women in Science and Engineering Program (WiSE) she changed the way mentees were matched with mentors to better account for how different the college experience is for each student.   She increased programs through WiSE including programs for high school students to increase interest in the STEM fields.  She advocated for greater diversity and inclusion in science and engineering student groups and is working on improving recruitment processes and implementing diversity and inclusion trainings for student leaders.  As Editor-in-Chief of Triple Helix, a campus publication that features articles on scientific advancements and their implications for society, she changed the acceptance policy for writers so that people are accepted regardless of their writing level. This is to accommodate the different backgrounds that students come from and foster a more diverse cohort of writers and creative thinkers.  This successfully increased the staff, diversified the ideas, and allowed for mentorship of other students within the field.  Adrija has also served as a Meiklejohn,  Residential Peer Leader, and as a Teaching Assistant while at Brown.  After taking a gap year, she hopes to enroll in medical school.  As a physician, she wants to treat people while exploring ways to make healthcare more accessible and give people more agency and control over their own health.

 

Sholei M. Croom is from Morristown, New Jersey.  They are receiving an Sc.B. (Honors) in Cognitive Science.  Sholei cares deeply about equity in the Brown and larger community.  They took a leading role in the revival, reconstruction, and development of the Queer Alliance (QA).  They overhauled the mission statement of QA ensuring it reflected the values of the group. Their work in the revival of the group as well as their taking leadership as the coordinator of the organization led to a strong and vibrant organization.  QA is now thriving and includes many subgroups, events, and supports.  Under their leadership QA has also won best event for their Pride Prom last year.  Sholei is committed to social justice and is cognizant of taking steps to make the community inclusive.  They advocated for making QA more welcoming for queer students of color, encouraging them to apply to the executive board.  They also served as coordinator of The Next Thing (TNT), a group for queer, trans, and questioning students of color.   Sholei has also served as a Women’s Peer Counselor,  Women Peer Counselor Coordinator, Social Justice Peer Educator with the Brown Center for Students of Color,, TWTP workshop facilitator, and LGBTQ center rep for the Student Advisory Board. They have also worked to create an inclusive environment in the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological sciences by helping draft their Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan and serving as a Departmental Undergraduate Group Leader.  They are involved in research at the 3D Information for Perception and Action Lab as a sophomore received an international UTRA to do visual science research at the Italian Institute of Technology.   Sholei plans to continue her research and eventually enter a Ph.D. program in Cognitive Science.

 

Aidea Downie is from Long Island, New York.  She is a double concentrator and will be receiving an A.B. in History and an A.B. in Anthropology.  Aidea is a first generation, African American student who has created spaces of mentorship and learning on campus and within the community.  One of her most notable accomplishments has been bringing the Petey Greene Program to Brown in September of 2015.  She served as the Chapter Founder and remains as one of the head coordinators.  The Petey Greene Program works to recruit and train around 40-50 undergraduate and graduate students to tutor and TA in educational classes in RI and MA prisons.  She has built a sustainable program, through recruiting volunteers and raising funds of $10,000 a year, to actively work on prison reform such as prison education and restorative justice.  Her work extends to educating the community by having the program host events and panels on different aspects of the criminal justice system.  Aidea has also served as a black heritage series programmer organizing  events that explored African and African Diaspora culture and brought speakers, such as Angela Davis, that intellectually engaged with issues within the Black community.  She participated in the Donald J. Wiedner Summer for Undergraduates at the College of Law,  interned for the NYC Division of Human Rights, and RI Senate Policy office as a part of the Arthur Liman Public Interest Fellowship, received an UTRA to serve as the Research Assistant under Historian Nancy Jacobs, spending a summer in Kenya to interview and research a former Kenyan diplomat, Washington Okumu who was influential in South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy. She also studied the criminal justice system and police brutality through a research assistantship with Anthropologist Kay Warren.  Aidea will remain at Brown to earn her MA in Urban Education Policy while working as the Regional Manager of the RI Petey Greene Program.  She eventually plans to attend law school.

 

Liliana Sampedro is from Eugene, Oregon.  She is a double concentrator and will be receiving an A.B. in Ethnic Studies and an A.B. in Sociology.  Liliana is a “strong and compassionate leader who is committed to realizing the leadership potential in others.”  Her work has centered around labor and immigration rights.  She has advocated for the rights of workers as part of the Student Labor Alliance, successfully organizing a campaign with library workers for a higher wage, and has worked  with the fair food movement by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers.  She revived and organized the Brown Immigrant Rights Coalition and is part of the FLi Center Undocumented Student Initiative Advisory Board. In addition to her work with the FLi Center and with labor rights, she has been instrumental in the work around supporting Latinx students on campus.  She has served as the Latinx Student Initiative Coordinator at the Brown Center for Students of Color (BCSC).  During that time she was part of the team organizing the first 1vyG conference for first generation students across the Ivy League.  She created programs to continue to unite and support the Latinx student community as well as facilitating workshops during the Third World Transition Program (TWTP).  For her work with the BCSC she was awarded their Rising Star Award.   She has received an UTRA for her research and is a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow.  She has used these platforms to encourage others to explore their possibilities as students.  She has served on the Diversity and Inclusion Oversight Board, as a Fellowships, Internships, and as the Research Experiences Coordinator at the Curricular Resources Center.  Liliana will return home for a year to work as a bilingual aid in classrooms. She hopes to further develop her social justice politics before pursuing a PhD in Ethnic Studies with the hope of becoming a professor.

 

TEAM

 

Adeiyewunmi "Ade" Osinubi is from Somerset, New Jersey.  She will be receiving an A.B. in Public Health.  Among her family and peers, Ade is known as a compassionate, God-fearing, and hardworking person who proudly represents her Nigerian roots.  A significant theme in her engagement at Brown has been social justice and supporting students of color, particularly Black Students. As a Minority Peer Counselor, Women's Peer Counselor, and Co-President of the Black Student Union (BSU), Ade has worked to make students of color feel comfortable, encouraged, and included while being at a predominantly white institution.  Her most significant contributions have been in her work with the Black Student Union Executive Board for which she has served as Co-President, Vice-President, Historian, and First Year Liaison.  In her role as Co-President with Keyanna Thompson Atticot ‘18she helped organize Brown University’s first ever Black History Month Concert, headlined by Jamila Woods ‘11 and was free of charge to the student community.  She was also able to help raise$14,000 to support 50 Black students’ attendance to the annual Black Solidarity Conference at Yale University. During her tenure, the BSU also held a pageant to spotlight Black students on campus, and started affinity group mixers which have created smaller spaces for people of marginalized identities within the Black community, such as Black LGBTQIA students and Black low income students.  They have also focused on community service through events such as gift wrapping with the Salvation Army, projects with DARE, and food drives.  As a member of the Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) Class of 2020, Ade will be pursuing a medical degree at the Warren Alpert Medical School here at Brown University, after which she hopes to focus on minority women’s health and health disparities.

Keyanna Thompson-Atticot is from Queens, New York.  She will be receiving an A.B. in Economics.  Keyanna is a first generation college student who has been invested in using her various leadership platforms to foster and deepen conversations on diversity and inclusion and amplify the voices of marginalized and intersectional identities.  As Co-President of the Brown Student Union (BSU) with Adeiyewunmi “Ade” Osinubi ‘18, she helped organize Brown University’s first ever Black History Month Concert, headlined by Jamila Woods ‘11 and was free of charge to the student community.  She was also able to help raise$14,000 to support 50 Black students’ attendance to the annual Black Solidarity Conference at Yale University.  During her tenure, the BSU also held a pageant to spotlight Black students on campus, and started affinity group mixers which have created smaller spaces for people of marginalized identities within the Black community, such as Black LGBTQIA students and Black low income students.  They have also focused on community service through events such as gift wrapping with the Salvation Army, projects with DARE, and food drives.  In addition to the BSU Keyanna has held leadership positions in a variety of organizations and offices on campus  including the Students of Caribbean Ancestry Club, the Black Pre-Law Association, the Minority Peer Counselor, Women Peer Counselor, and Residential Peer Leader programs.  She has also been a Regional Representative for Keeney Quad in the Office of Residential Life.  Outside of Brown she has been a volunteer at the YMCA, conducted research on informality and human rights violations while abroad, and served as a communication fellow for Social Change Agents Institute.  Keyanna will be moving home to New York to pursue her interests in the entertainment industry before applying to law school with the goal of becoming an entertainment lawyer.

As Co-Presidents of the Brown Student Union (BSU), Adeiyewunmi "Ade" Osinubi and Keyanna Thompson-Atticot helped organize Brown University’s first ever Black History Month Concert, headlined by Jamila Woods ‘11 and was free of charge to the student community.  They were also able to help raise $14,000 to support 50 Black students’ attendance to the annual Black Solidarity Conference at Yale University.  During their tenure, the BSU also held a pageant to spotlight Black students on campus, and started affinity group mixers which have created smaller spaces for people of marginalized identities within the Black community, such as Black LGBTQIA students and Black low income students.  They have also focused on community service through events such as gift wrapping with the Salvation Army, projects with DARE, and food drives.