Courses for Fall 2017

  • Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance

    This course offers students an opportunity to examine and analyze a range of contemporary global social problems from an anthropological perspective. We will explore human-environment entanglements with particular attention to intersecting issues of capitalism, international development, and state and non-state governance. Course materials will look at various kinds of work in, on, and with the environment, asking questions about the possibilities of over-working our landscapes, while addressing the potentials for social and environment justice and sustainability.
    ANTH 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Past Forward: Discovering Anthropological Archaeology

    This course offers a broad journey through the human past, from material culture crafted by our evolutionary ancestors to the remnants of the recent historic past. To facilitate this journey, the class explores the methods, concepts, and theories that anthropologists employ in the study of past peoples, places, and things. Case studies stretch across the globe. As a hands-on endeavor, archaeology focuses on tangible evidence. In this course, small-group discussion, laboratory, and field exercises will complement lectures, leading to an understanding of how anthropologists study the past and how that knowledge affects the present.
    ANTH 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    de Carteret
  • Introduction to Modern South Asia

    Students will be introduced to the social, political, cultural, and religious lives of people from the region known as ‘South Asia’. Course lectures and materials will draw from a broad range of material covering Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. This course is designed to get students to think broadly about themes related to social inclusion, state formation, discrimination, ethnic and social conflict, identity politics, and a host of other issues that have defined the region. This course will help students think about how themes, conversations, and course material can connect to their own research interests. DPLL
    ANTH 0700 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Horton
  • Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    This introduction to the study of language and culture considers how language not only reflects social reality but also creates it. We'll examine specific cases of broad current relevance, in the process learning how an analytical anthropological approach to language use lays bare its often hidden power. We'll consider how language creates and reinforces social inequality and difference, how language promotes and resists globalization, and how language is used creatively in performance, literature, film, advertising, and mass media. We will also consider how language does important social work in specific contexts, such as classrooms, courtrooms, medical settings, and political campaigns. DPLL
    ANTH 0800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • Religion and Culture

    Global events in recent years seem to defy the commonsensical idea that religious traditions would decline or disappear in the modern epoch. We examine classic theories and methods in the study of religion to understand the continuing vitality of spiritual contemplation, asceticism, myths, rituals, magic, witchcraft, experiences of healing, and other ways of thinking and acting that are typically associated with (or against) the concept of religion. DPLL
    ANTH 1240 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • The Visual in Anthropology: Documentary Films and Society

    This lecture course entails an introduction of the history of anthropology complemented with cinematic documentary films. Anthropological text is used to demonstrate continuity between the visual and the written word in select films screened for the course. Weekly topics address the anthropology of exclusive authors to critically juxtapose their work with discussion on either the convergence or discontinuity in the uses of the documentary films. Do films inform us or deviate from our understanding of the written anthropological ethnographies? How do we read culture from the visual? Is culture or the social readable or not? DPLL
    ANTH 1253 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Anthropology of Addictions and Recovery

    The purpose of this course is to consider the uses and misuses alcohol, tobacco and drugs, and approaches to recovery from addictions. We will read some of the major cross cultural, ethnographic, linguistic, and social-political works on addictions. Students will have the opportunity to conduct their own anthropological interviews regarding substance misuse and recovery as well as observe a local 12 step recovery meeting. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT
    ANTH 1300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Ancient Maya Writing

    Nature and content of Mayan hieroglyphic writing, from 100 to 1600 CE. Methods of decipherment, introduction to textual study, and application to interpretations of Mayan language, imagery, world view, and society. Literacy and Mesoamerican background of script.
    ANTH 1650 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives.
    ANTH 1720 S01
    Primary Instructor
    de Carteret
  • Anthropology in/of the Museum

    This course provides an introduction to museums from an anthropological perspective. Topics include politics of representation and the construction of the “Other”; objects, identity, and meaning; collecting and cultural property; and collaboration, community engagement, and indigenous self-representation. Assignments involve work with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology’s exhibitions and collections. The course focuses on museums dedicated to natural and cultural history, but establishes theoretical and practical grounding for thinking about and working in other disciplines and other kinds of display institutions. It is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. There are no prerequisites; but familiarity with anthropology is presumed.
    ANTH 1901 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McCormick
  • Faces of Culture

    The seminar is designed to allow you as anthropology majors to question to debate and examine some of the assumptions of the discipline, and critically explore the multfacious uses of the concept. We will contextualize the study of culture with the history of anthropology and across other disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. Limited to 20. Prerequisite: ANTH1900
    ANTH 1910D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History of Ethnological Theory

    A seminar investigating some themes in the history of anthropological theory. Starting with the delineations of the scope and nature of social science by Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, the seminar then considers various explorations of the concepts of structure, function, and agency, concluding with Bourdieu's reformulation of social anthropology for a new generation in the form of practice theory.
    ANTH 2000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
  • Proposal Writing Workshop for Anthropological Fieldwork

    This course is designed for third-year graduate students in any subfield of anthropology or closely related fields who are writing grant proposals for dissertation research. Student grant proposals will be pre-circulated and workshopped. Students will gain familiarity with the format for writing successful proposals, with the strategies needed to operationalize them, and with the everyday academic labor of both offering and responding to substantive feedback.
    ANTH 2045 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
    ANTH 2060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Analysis of Social Structure

    This course will discuss the analysis of kinship and the construction of the person cross culturally.
    ANTH 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Life Itself

    Have our conceptions of life been too anthropocentric, as many anthropologists and critical theorists have recently argued? What would it mean to develop a wider "vitalist" conception of the human? Would the category of humanism itself be dissolved? How do these new theoretical problems relate to longstanding issues within anthropology and philosophy? In this course we explore intellectual genealogies for these local and global dilemmas around the conception of life itself, through recent ethnographies and classic texts of social theory, and continental philosophy. Authors include Foucault, Deleuze, Nietzsche, Agamben, Jane Bennett, and others read alongside recent ethnographic work.
    ANTH 2225 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Principles of Archaeology

    Examines theoretical and methodological issues in anthropological archaeology. Attention is given to past concerns, current debates, and future directions of archaeology in the social sciences.
    ANTH 2501 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Archaeology and the Ancient World
    ARCH 0730 The Secrets of Ancient Bones: Discovering Ancient DNA
    ARCH 2180 Memory and Materiality
    ARCH 2184 Material Culture and the Bodily Senses: Past and Present
    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 1972Y Indigenous Peoples and American Law
    Modern Greek
    MGRK 1220 Decolonizing Classical Antiquity: White Nationalism, Colonialism, and Ancient Material Heritage
    Urban Studies
    URBN 0230 Urban Life in Providence: An Introduction
    ANTH XLIST 0