Courses for Fall 2016

  • So You Want to Change the World?

    Examines from an anthropological perspective efforts to address global poverty that are typically labeled as "development." The enterprise of development is considered critically, both with regard to the intentions and purposes that underlie the actions of wealthy countries, donor organizations, and expatriate development workers and with regard to the outcomes for the people who are the intended beneficiaries. Privileging the prespectives of ordinary people in developing countries, but also looking carefully at the institutions involved in development, the course relies heavily on ethnographic case studies that will draw students into the complexity of one of the greatest contemporary global problems: social inequality. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0066J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance

    This course offers students an opportunity to examine and analyze a range of contemporary global social problems from an anthropological perspective. We will explore human-environment entanglements with particular attention to intersecting issues of capitalism, international development, and state and non-state governance. Course materials will look at various kinds of work in, on, and with the environment, asking questions about the possibilities of over-working our landscapes, while addressing the potentials for social and environment justice and sustainability. LILE
    ANTH 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Past Forward: Discovering Anthropological Archaeology

    This course offers a broad journey through the human past, from material culture crafted by our evolutionary ancestors to the remnants of the recent historic past. To facilitate this journey, the class explores the methods, concepts, and theories that anthropologists employ in the study of past peoples, places, and things. Case studies stretch across the globe. As a hands-on endeavor, archaeology focuses on tangible evidence. In this course, small-group discussion, laboratory, and field exercises will complement lectures, leading to an understanding of how anthropologists study the past and how that knowledge affects the present. LILE
    ANTH 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    This introduction to the study of language and culture considers how language not only reflects social reality but also creates it. We'll examine specific cases of broad current relevance, in the process learning how an analytical anthropological approach to language use lays bare its often hidden power. We'll consider how language creates and reinforces social inequality and difference, how language promotes and resists globalization, and how language is used creatively in performance, literature, film, advertising, and mass media. We will also consider how language does important social work in specific contexts, such as classrooms, courtrooms, medical settings, and political campaigns. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sherouse
  • Anthropology of Climate Change

    Contemporary climate change is a profoundly human issue. This course disaggregates “the human” in climate change, employing an anthropological perspective to ask how people experience changing climates in different ways throughout the world. From receding glaciers to rising seas to unpredictable seasons and periods of drought, the ways people understand, respond to, and experience climate change are shaped by diverse cultures and histories. Topics include environmental change, capitalism, energy, climate justice in indigenous communities, green economies, tropical forests, denial and skepticism, and the visibility of climate change. Articles and ethnographies cover the Global North as well as the Global South. DPLL
    ANTH 1112 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Graef
  • Peoples and the Cultures of the Americas

    Examines the diverse cultures and history of the Americas - especially Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Topics include the organization of labor, cultural and artistic practices, changing conventions of gender and family, international migration, national and local identities, indigenous rights, and protest and rebellion. LILE DPLL
    ANTH 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Barbarians and Bandits: Exploring Subaltern Resilience and State Power

    In the imaginations of ancient Greeks and Romans, the urban centers of ‘civilization’ were surrounded by wild lands where barbarians roamed. Even now, mountains, marshes, forests, and deserts are the realms of bandits, primitive tribes, warlords, and terrorists. From ‘shepherd-bandits’ in highland Sardinia and ‘red-faced Gauls’ in Roman France to ‘marginal tribes’ in the Kabyle mountains and the ‘wild people’ of the Ethiopian borderlands, this course explores peripheral lands through time and across the globe. We will critically examine such stereotypical representations, to understand how their inhabitants carved out their own spaces in the interstices of ancient and modern states.
    ANTH 1145 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Van Dommelen
  • The Anthropology of Play

    Play enters all fields, from physics to human development, art to scientific experimentation. In all cultures, play figures centrally in rites of passage, child development, learning, and times of celebration. Central to this course is an understanding of the rules of play, its intentions in work, functions throughout human history, and role in formal education. LILE
    ANTH 1212 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sherouse
  • Gender, Nature, the Body

    This course is an interrogation of the ways in which gender difference comes to be conceived of as “natural” in modern science and different cultures. What is the connection between the science of gender difference and the colonial encounter? What are some different ways of imagining gender difference? How are gender inequalities structured and perpetuated by science and political economy? Through careful reading of historical and anthropological texts, we will learn about various ways in which gender systems are constructed and resisted, how science is used to construct gender, and how gender politics influence scientific outcomes and practices. DPLL SOPH WRIT
    ANTH 1223 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law

    Designed to give students an opportunity to engage in transnational research on social issues through an extended case study of a new generation of international norms that identify and combat "human trafficking." The course format combines seminar discussions, lectures, and small group exercises. Students will learn by doing. As we consider legal instruments, UN and U.S. documentary archives, anti-trafficking media such as films and websites, and the prosecution of criminal networks, we will experiment with alternative methodologies for analyzing them. We will study the relation of texts to the social and political contexts of their production and circulation. Enrollment limited to 30. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1224 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Bioethics and Culture

    This course examines bioethics from an ethnographic point of view. Topics include pregnancy, death, suicide, disability, medical research, organ transplantation, and population control. We will distinguish between the moral experiences of people faced with difficult choices, and the ethical ideals to which they aspire. We will then ask: how can these perspectives be reconciled? When trying to reconcile these perspectives, how can we account for powerful dynamics of race, gender, class, religion, and cultural difference? Finally, how can we develop a code of ethics that takes these issues into account and also is fundamentally connected to everyday life? DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1242 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Anthropology of Addictions and Recovery

    The purpose of this course is to consider the uses and misuses alcohol, tobacco and drugs, and approaches to recovery from addictions. We will read some of the major cross cultural, ethnographic, linguistic, and social-political works on addictions. Students will have the opportunity to conduct their own anthropological interviews regarding substance misuse and recovery as well as observe a local 12 step recovery meeting. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Vertical Civilization: South American Archaeology from Monte Verde to the Inkas

    This course offers an introduction to the archaeology of indigenous south American Civilizations, from the peopling of the continent around 13,000 years ago, to the Spanish Invasion of the 16th Century C.E. Throughout, we seek to understand the often unique solutions that South America indigenous peoples developed to deal with risk and to make sense of the world around them. Course lectures and discussions focus on recent research and major debates. Weekly sections draw on viewings of artifacts and manuscripts from the Haffenreffer Museum and the John Carter Brown Library. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1505 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Anthropology of Mental Health

    Mental illness and wellbeing have been defined and treated in dramatically different ways across cultures and historical epochs. In this course we engage with religious and secular healing traditions including biomedicine, and the ways in which these shape the experience and understanding of “madness”, of common mental disorders (such as depression and anxiety), and changing perceptions of the normal and the pathological. Drawing on anthropology, psychiatry, philosophy, literature and cinema, we follow the emergence, translation and critique of diagnostic categories across different parts of the contemporary world. Key authors include Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, Kleinman, Good, Veena Das, and others.
    ANTH 1515 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Indians, Colonists, and Africans in New England

    The course explores the colonial and capitalist transformation of New England's social and cultural landscapes following European contact. Using archaeology as critical evidence, we will examine claims about conquest, Indian Extinction, and class, gender and race relations by studying the daily lives and interactions of the area's diverse Native American, African American, and European peoples. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1624 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives. LILE
    ANTH 1720 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • The Pictured Text

    Writing makes language visible, and thus concerns images. Language also delimits the legibility of imagery. Turning words into images and images into words occurs at great speed around us. This course explores the relation of text and image across world traditions—Chinese, Mayan, Egyptian, Islamic, Greco-Roman, and others, extending up to the present. Topics include: calligraphy, context, scribal practice, the form and shape of writing, including typography, hidden or pseudo-writing, graffiti, and contemporary art.
    ANTH 1830 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Ethnography + Social Critique

    This class will study classic and contemporary anthropological ethnographies – as well as studies from sociology, journalism, and history – that achieve ethnographic results, but will require discussion to determine what they “are.” We will examine the methods involved in research for the books and articles and how the ethnographies were written. Ethnographies will be chosen for their importance in anthropology and other fields, and will cover a broad range of topical and geographic contexts. This class is to study ethnographies more than to make them. That said, assignments will include practicing certain methods that are often employed by ethnographers. Preference given to students who have taken another Anthropology class. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1848 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Anthropology in/of the Museum

    This course provides an introduction to museums from an anthropological perspective. Topics include politics of representation and the construction of the “Other”; objects, identity, and meaning; collecting and cultural property; and collaboration, community engagement, and indigenous self-representation. Assignments involve work with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology’s exhibitions and collections. The course focuses on museums dedicated to natural and cultural history, but establishes theoretical and practical grounding for thinking about and working in other disciplines and other kinds of display institutions. It is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. There are no prerequisites; but familiarity with anthropology is presumed.
  • Faces of Culture

    The seminar is designed to allow you as anthropology majors to question to debate and examine some of the assumptions of the discipline, and critically explore the multfacious uses of the concept. We will contextualize the study of culture with the history of anthropology and across other disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. Limited to 20. Prerequisite: ANTH1900
    ANTH 1910D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Moran-Thomas
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History of Ethnological Theory

    A seminar investigating some themes in the history of anthropological theory. Starting with the delineations of the scope and nature of social science by Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, the seminar then considers various explorations of the concepts of structure, function, and agency, concluding with Bourdieu's reformulation of social anthropology for a new generation in the form of practice theory.
    ANTH 2000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
  • Labor and Social Life

    This is a graduate seminar that will explore anthropologies of labor. The Fall 2016 focus will be on labor, posthuman and feminist theory, and critical studies of capitalism.
    ANTH 2018 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Proposal Writing Workshop for Anthropological Fieldwork

    This course is designed for third-year graduate students in any subfield of anthropology or closely related fields who are writing grant proposals for dissertation research. Student grant proposals will be pre-circulated and workshopped. Students will gain familiarity with the format for writing successful proposals, with the strategies needed to operationalize them, and with the everyday academic labor of both offering and responding to substantive feedback.
    ANTH 2045 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
    ANTH 2060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Medical Anthropology

    This graduate seminar provides a theoretical, methodological, and ethnographic foundation in medical anthropology. The focus will be on sociocultural approaches to the study of the suffering, illness and the body, though the course will also engage with key issues in biocultural approaches to understanding disease processes. Topics will include: social suffering, religion and medicine, local biologies, gender and the body, biotechnology, bioethics, caregiving and doctoring, and the global burden of disease.
    ANTH 2230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Decolonizing Feminist Anthropology: Theory and Method

    This course will build upon the momentum gained from the work and engagement of critical, and radical scholars of postcolonialism, feminism, race, cultural studies, sexuality studies, and indigeneous studies in revealing multiple blind spots and various forms of violence associated with the privileging of Eurocentric, liberal, secular, enlightenment, and rationalist ways of seeing the world.
    ANTH 2252 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Daulatzai
  • Anthropology of State Power and Powerlessness

    How do we conceptualize state power? Is sovereign power primarily a capacity for force and coercion or a source of welfare and social cohesion? States the world over often do not manage to provide adequate welfare or to maintain a monopoly on violence. How then might we understand state power not only as a capacity but also in its incapacities and vulnerabilities? We engage these paradoxes of power through classic texts of anthropology and political theory including Foucault, Deleuze, Weber, Hobbes, and Rousseau, in tandem with lively ethnographic analyses of state power in its capacities and incapacities.
    ANTH 2315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Problems in Archaeology: Archaeology of Colonialism

    Explores the theoretical discourses shaping anthropological approaches and defining archaeological projects on culture contact and colonialism. Attention will be given to examining colonial encounters between Europeans and indigenous peoples as ongoing processes rather than particular historical moments, and to looking at recent efforts at decolonizing archaeological practice.
    ANTH 2500A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Principles of Archaeology

    Examines theoretical and methodological issues in anthropological archaeology. Attention is given to past concerns, current debates, and future directions of archaeology in the social sciences.
    ANTH 2501 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Mesoamerican Archaeology and Ethnohistory

    Seminar focusing on current issues in the archaeology and history of Mesoamerica, including Mexico and Northern Central America. Draws on rich resources at Brown, including the John Carter Brown Library.
    ANTH 2520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Archaeology and the Ancient World
    ARCH 1900 The Archaeology of College Hill
    Environmental Studies
    ENVS 0070E What Does It Mean To Be Green?
    Public Health
    PHP 1070 The Burden of Disease in Developing Countries
    ANTH XLIST 0