Courses for Spring 2018

  • Who Owns the Past?

    Examines the role of the past in the present. Using examples from the U.S. and other parts of the world, we will look at how archaeological evidence is implicated in contemporary cultural and political issues. Students will learn that the past is not just the focus of archaeologists’ interest and scientific inquiries, but is also a subject romanticized by antiquarians, mobilized in nation-building, marketed for profit, re-enacted as entertainment, consumed by tourists, and glorified in commemoration. Understanding these different and competing valuations, claims, and uses of the archaeological past will provide an introduction to why the past matters in the present and to the future. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS DPLL
    ANTH 0066D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites. WRIT DPLL
    ANTH 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Myths Alive

    Myth is an important part of the architecture that sustains human culture and society. This course begins w/an account of the principal theoretical positions that've shaped anthropological understandings of myth as a living and guiding force in human communities in ancient times and in the present day. We'll examine the expressions of myth in senses of place, social harmony, inequality, conflict, religious experience, and radical social change in a wide variety of historical and ethnographic settings. We'll draw upon objects from Brown's Haffenreffer Museum to recognize them as materialized representations from mythical worlds. DPLL
    ANTH 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
  • Human Evolution

    Examination of theory and evidence on human evolution in the past, present and future. Topics include evolution and adaptation, biocultural adaptation, fossil evidence, behavioral evolution in primates, human genetic variation and contemporary human biological variation.
    ANTH 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    de Carteret
  • Language and Migration

    This course is part of the Engaged Scholars Program and explores the interconnections between language and migration. We will examine talk about migration – in the form of immigration policy and media representations – as well as talk in contexts of migration including experiences such as border crossing, settlement, and schooling. Given the current context of increasing anti-immigrant rhetoric and an escalation of immigration enforcement, this course raises the timely and important question of how experiences of migration and the politics of mobility are shaped by language. Our investigation will combine engaged anthropological approaches with linguistic anthropological theories and methods.
    ANTH 0805 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • Youth, Art, and the Promised City: Recreating The Green Book

    This engaged scholars course uses anthropological and historical methods to explore the contributions of young people in the imagining and crafting of a sustainable urban future. Drawing inspiration from The Negro Motorists Green Book (Green, 1936), a safe travel guide for African Americans in the Jim Crow era, the course pairs students at Brown with youth at a local after-school arts program. Through drawing, painting, writing, mapmaking, and other techniques for creative social inquiry, we develop and share an updated “guide” for urban movement that reflects on the conditions and possibilities of the surrounding neighborhood and city.
    ANTH 0820 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • Babel's Basement: An Introduction to Linguistic Discrimination (and Redemption)

    This course introduces students to the ways people use language to promote racial, economic, and social inequality. It begins from the idea people often view language as merely reflecting, thus obscuring the ways we actively create the world through our use of language. This course explores the myriad ways that language is used to exercise power, naturalize inequality, and promote discrimination based on race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other axes of difference. It also examines how language can subvert the exercise of power, converting language from a weapon that marginalizes people to a tool that empowers them.
    ANTH 0900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture: A World That Matters

    Survey of ancient art and building in ancient America, with a focus on Mexico, Central America, and the Andes. Underlying concepts include: meaning and method, cosmos and kingship, narrative and symbol, personality and authorship, empire and royal court. Rich collections of the Haffenreffer museum will form the focus of work in the class. DPLL WRIT
    ANTH 1030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Indigenous Archaeologies

    This is an intro. to Indigenous archaeology, sometimes defined as archaeology "by, for and with Indigenous peoples." These approaches combine the study of the past with contemporary social justice concerns. However, they are more than this. In addition to seeking to make archaeology more inclusive of and responsible to Indigenous peoples, they seek to contribute a more accurate understanding of archaeological record. They thus do not reject science, but attempt to broaden it through a consideration of Indigenous epistemologies. This course covers topics as the history of anthropological archaeology, Indigenous knowledge and science, decolonizing methodologies, representational practices and NAGPRA. DPLL
    ANTH 1125 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Laluk
  • War and Society

    Cross-cultural and historical perspectives on war and its larger social context. Course readings and lectures use political economic, cultural, and feminist approaches to understanding war and its effects on social life. Case studies will be drawn from several eras and areas of the globe, including the Rwandan genocide, Central American counterinsurgency wars of the 1980s, and the war in Iraq.
    ANTH 1232 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
  • Anthropology of Homelessness

    Homelessness emerged as a public concern in the United States and in other industrialized countries in the late 1970s as people began encountering people living on the streets, a way of life which had formerly been confined to the skid rows of large cities. In this course, through readings, readings, discussion, and hands on experiences with homeless populations, we will uncover the causes, conditions, and responses to homelessness. Each student will spend at least two hours per week in a local homeless-serving agency in order to gain face to face experiences. The field placements will be facilitated by the professor.
    ANTH 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • International Health: Anthropological Perspectives

    This upper-level medical anthropology course focuses on the social and cultural complexity of health problems in developing nations, employing anthropological approaches to public health. International health issues such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, reproductive health, violence, and mental illness will be examined. The historical, political and socio-cultural dimensions of international health problems will be explored through reading ethnographic case studies. DPLL
    ANTH 1310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Anthropology of the Himalayas

    This course critically examines the Himalayas, drawing on anthropological studies from Afghanistan to Northeast India. Despite the region’s rugged terrain, Himalayan peoples have long been linked through trade and migration. The Himalayas are sites of Hindu and Buddhist legend. Today, however, they are beset by environmental degradation and disaster. Long the object of romantic representations, people in the Himalayas struggle to find work and make ends meet. This course brings these themes together to examine the political, economic, environmental, religious, sensory, and affective aspects of everyday life in the Himalayas.
    ANTH 1345 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Archaeology of Death

    Examines death, burial, and memorials using comparative archaeological evidence from prehistory and historical periods. The course asks: What insight does burial give us about the human condition? How do human remains illuminate the lives of people in the past? What can mortuary artifacts tell us about personal identities and social relations? What do gravestones and monuments reveal about beliefs and emotions? Current cultural and legal challenges to the excavation and study of the dead are also considered. DPLL
    ANTH 1623 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives.
    ANTH 1720 S01
    Primary Instructor
    de Carteret
  • History of Anthropology: Anthropological Theories

    Looks at the way anthropological methods and theories have interlaced through history to understand the dominant concerns in present-day anthropology. What were the important issues that influenced the discipline's history? Who were the significant, and not so well known, historic personalities who shaped anthropological practice and gave it its identity? Enrollment limited to 20.
    ANTH 1900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Yerby
  • Material Matters

    In the past decade there has been a growing interest in the study of material culture as an explicitly interdisciplinary endeavor involving anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, literary critics, and philosophers among others. These studies exhibit a range of perspectives from how people make things, to how things make people, how objects mediate social relationships, and how inanimate objects can be argued as having a form of agency. This seminar is a capstone course for senior anthropology concentrators. It is designed to encourage reflection on material culture and its influence in shaping our lives and those of other peoples and cultures.
    ANTH 1910I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Ethnographic Research Methods

    To understand the different theoretical assumptions that shape research efforts; to examine how hypotheses and research questions are formulated; and to appreciate the ethical and scientific dimensions of research by hands-on experience in fieldwork projects. Prerequisite: One Anthropology course. WRIT
    ANTH 1940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    A seminar exploring fundamental theoretical and ethnographic currents in 20th- and 21st-century cultural anthropology.
    ANTH 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Body Arts: The Human Frame as Cultural Expression

    The body is inescapable: humans live with it and through it, sending messages and instating identity. The body remains, and will remain, our principal means of cultural expression. As its guiding proposition, this seminar affirms that body arts have a history and social setting, whether of gesture, clothing, fashion, tattooing, make-up, hair-styles, cranial deformation, jewelry, perfume, dance or other embellishments and subtractions of the human frame. Those arts involve material equipment and a set of theories and dispositions needing close review and appraisal. These come from varied sources, including anthropology, art history, cultural studies, literature history or archaeology.
    ANTH 2011 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Methods of Anthropological Research

    A seminar on the methodological problems associated with field research in social and cultural anthropology. Designed to help students prepare for both summer and dissertation research.
    ANTH 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
    ANTH 2060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Ideology of Development

    An examination of different development theories and their relationship to field application. The analysis of project preparation and implementation is used to question the goals and objectives of Western and indigenous notions of progress and change within a social and economic context. Third World countries are utilized as case studies to address related issues, such as the meaning of development.
    ANTH 2320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Linguistic Theory and Practice

    An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language and social life. We begin by examining semiotic approaches to language. We turn to classical research on language as a structured system - covering such topics as phonology and grammatical categories - but we focus on the implications of such work for broader social scientific and humanistic research. We then consider areas of active contemporary research, including cognition and linguistic relativity, meaning and semantics, pronouns and deixis, deference and register, speech acts and performativity, interaction, verbal art and poetics, reported speech, performance, and linguistic ideology.
    ANTH 2800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Archaeology and the Ancient World
    ARCH 1175 Archaeology Matters! Past Perspectives on Modern Problems
    ARCH 1720 How Houses Build People
    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 2971E Kinds of Others
    International Relations
    INTL 1803S US-Mexico Borderlands Urban Studies
    URBN 1870S The City, the River, and the Sea: Social and Environmental Change at the Water's Edge
    ANTH XLIST 0