Courses for Spring 2016

  • Who Owns the Past?

    Examines the role of the past in the present. Using examples from the U.S. and other parts of the world, we will look at how archaeological evidence is implicated in contemporary cultural and political issues. Students will learn that the past is not just the focus of archaeologists’ interest and scientific inquiries, but is also a subject romanticized by antiquarians, mobilized in nation-building, marketed for profit, re-enacted as entertainment, consumed by tourists, and glorified in commemoration. Understanding these different and competing valuations, claims, and uses of the archaeological past will provide an introduction to why the past matters in the present and to the future. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS DPLL
    ANTH 0066D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Peoples and Cultures of Greater Mexico

    This course will focus on the cultural area known as Greater Mexico, incorporating Mexicans resident south of the Rio Grande, as well as the approximately 25 million Mexicans living permanently or for at a time in the United States. Specific topics to be covered in the class include: urban peasants and rural proletarians, recent challenges to gender conventions, national and international migration, nationalism and the changing meanings of the Conquest and colonial periods, land and indigenous rights, everday violence, machismo, popular culture, and protest and rebellion. Limited to first-year students. DPLL FYS LILE
    ANTH 0066N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites. WRIT DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Flores
  • Myths Alive

    Myth is an important part of the architecture that sustains human culture and society. This course begins w/an account of the principal theoretical positions that've shaped anthropological understandings of myth as a living and guiding force in human communities in ancient times and in the present day. We'll examine the expressions of myth in senses of place, social harmony, inequality, conflict, religious experience, and radical social change in a wide variety of historical and ethnographic settings. We'll draw upon objects from Brown's Haffenreffer Museum to recognize them as materialized representations from mythical worlds. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
  • Culture and Health

    An introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Lecture reading and discussion will examine the social context of health and illness, looking at the diverse ways in which humans use cultural resources to cope with disease and develop medical systems. The course will provide an introduction to the overall theoretical frameworks that guide anthropological approaches to studying human health related behavior. Medical anthropology offers a unique and revealing perspective on the cultural diversity that characterizes human experiences of sexuality, disease, aging, mental illness, disability, inequality and death. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • Anthropology of Gender and Globalization

    We live in a global world in which the movements of people, goods, and ideas cause productive frictions, transforming the prevailing formations of gender and sexuality. This course examines the intersections of gender and globalization by looking at how globalization shapes cultural constructions and political configurations of gender, and exploring how an ethnographic focus on gender sheds light on various aspects of globalization. Topics covered include anthropological theory of gender and sexuality, gender and global capital, gender and the (colonial) state, and gender and global politics (including gender activism, human rights, and development). Open to undergraduates only. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0302 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Daulatzai
  • Past Forward: Discovering Anthropological Archaeology

    This course offers a broad journey through the human past, from material culture crafted by our evolutionary ancestors to the remnants of the recent historic past. To facilitate this journey, the class explores the methods, concepts, and theories that anthropologists employ in the study of past peoples, places, and things. Case studies stretch across the globe. As a hands-on endeavor, archaeology focuses on tangible evidence. In this course, small-group discussion, laboratory, and field exercises will complement lectures, leading to an understanding of how anthropologists study the past and how that knowledge affects the present. LILE
    ANTH 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture: A World That Matters

    Survey of ancient art and building in ancient America, with a focus on Mexico, Central America, and the Andes. Underlying concepts include: meaning and method, cosmos and kingship, narrative and symbol, personality and authorship, empire and royal court. Rich collections of the Haffenreffer museum will form the focus of work in the class. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Peoples and the Cultures of the Americas

    Examines the diverse cultures and history of the Americas - especially Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Topics include the organization of labor, cultural and artistic practices, changing conventions of gender and family, international migration, national and local identities, indigenous rights, and protest and rebellion. LILE DPLL
    ANTH 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East

    An introduction to ethnographic studies of Middle East, focus on: religion, language, modernity, gender, and political culture. Students will engage in critical examination which anthropologists sought to capture Middle Eastern life, and problems that have pervaded anthropological representation, methodologically and theoretically. You will learn, through the ways anthropologists approach the peoples, ideas, and cultures of the region in ways that complement and contradict the knowledge production of other disciplines, the processes we come to understand cultural difference, and ways this encounter sheds light on our selves and practices. Previous course in Anthropology/ Middle East studies is suggested. Enrollment limited to 25. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1151 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Straughn
  • Violence and the Media

    The role of media in shaping perceptions of violent conflict. Analysis of constructions of the "violent other", "victims", and "suffering", the use of culture, ethnicity, and psychopathology as tropes for articulating the motivations of violent perpetrators. Multiple subject positions and political interests will be considered. Case studies include the Cold War, conflicts, insurgencies urban riots, the genocide, and terrorism. Pre-requisite: a previous course in Anthropology, or permission of the instructor.
    ANTH 1251 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Anthropology of Homelessness

    Homelessness emerged as a public concern in the United States and in other industrialized countries in the late 1970s as people began encountering people living on the streets, a way of life which had formerly been confined to the skid rows of large cities. In this course, through readings, readings, discussion, and hands on experiences with homeless populations, we will uncover the causes, conditions, and responses to homelessness. Each student will spend at least two hours per week in a local homeless-serving agency in order to gain face to face experiences. The field placements will be facilitated by the professor. LILE
    ANTH 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Language and Medicine in Practice

    This course is part of the Engaged Scholars Program and provides a foundation through which to think about how people’s use of language shapes and is shaped by the medical sphere. Team taught by a linguistic anthropologist (Faudree) and medical anthropologist (Hamdy), this course provides foundations to understanding the scholarly intersections between language, medicine, and society. At the same time, the course offers a strong pragmatic dimension, as students will engage in volunteer and participant-observation work in clinical settings. Throughout the course we will be bringing our insight and observations of clinical practice to bear on anthropological tools of analysis. The course is limited to 20 students who will be admitted to the class via an application process. Priority given to seniors, those in the Engaged Scholars Program, and Anthropology concentrators. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1311 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Environmentalism and the Politics of Nature

    This seminar covers fundamental themes and advanced topics in the field of environmental anthropology. Over the course of the semester, we examine the relationship between environmentalism, conservation, and globalization. The geographic focus is the Global South; articles and ethnographies cover cases in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Topics include indigeneity, wilderness, parks and protected areas, politics of space, development, and ideas of native and invasive species. DPLL
    ANTH 1556 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Graef
  • Archaeology of Death

    Examines death, burial, and memorials using comparative archaeological evidence from prehistory and historical periods. The course asks: What insight does burial give us about the human condition? How do human remains illuminate the lives of people in the past? What can mortuary artifacts tell us about personal identities and social relations? What do gravestones and monuments reveal about beliefs and emotions? Current cultural and legal challenges to the excavation and study of the dead are also considered. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1623 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Southwestern Archaeology

    This course is an introduction to the archaeology of the native peoples of the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. It discusses the history of the field and examines how it is currently re-engaging with contemporary native peoples. It emphasizes past and present cultural diversity and traces out long-term continuities in beliefs and practices. Special attention is given to comparing and contrasting three formative cultural systems - Chaco, Hohokam, and Paquimé - that linked the Southwest into a series of broad social, political, and ideological networks. Students will be introduced to the Southwestern collections of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. DPLL
    ANTH 1692 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • The Human Skeleton

    More than simply a tissue within our bodies, the human skeleton is a gateway into narratives of the past--from the evolution of our species to the biography of individual past lives. Through lecture and hands-on laboratory, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on the human skeleton in functional and evolutionary perspective. We'll also explore forensic and bioarchaeological approaches to the skeleton. By the course conclusion, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton from medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary perspectives. LILE
    ANTH 1720 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Anthropology in/of the Museum

    This course provides an introduction to museums from an anthropological perspective. Topics include politics of representation and the construction of the “Other”; objects, identity, and meaning; collecting and cultural property; and collaboration, community engagement, and indigenous self-representation. Assignments involve work with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology’s exhibitions and collections. The course focuses on museums dedicated to natural and cultural history, but establishes theoretical and practical grounding for thinking about and working in other disciplines and other kinds of display institutions. It is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. There are no prerequisites; but familiarity with anthropology is presumed.
    ANTH 1901 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Charest
  • Anthropological Approaches to World Issues

    Capstone seminar for Anthropology concentrators that explores how anthropology can challenge conventional or dominant wisdom about global social problems. Original research project required.
    ANTH 1910A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Moran-Thomas
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    A seminar exploring fundamental theoretical and ethnographic currents in 20th-century cultural anthropology.
    ANTH 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Methods of Anthropological Research

    A seminar on the methodological problems associated with field research in social and cultural anthropology. Designed to help students prepare for both summer and dissertation research.
    ANTH 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Ethnography

    Each week this class will study classic and contemporary ethnographies - as well as studies from sociology, journalism, and history - that achieve ethnographic results, but will require discussion to determine what they "are". We will carefully examine the methods involved in research for the books and how the ethnographies were written. Ethnographies will be chosen for their importance in anthropology and other fields, and will cover a broad range of topical and geographic contexts.
    ANTH 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
    ANTH 2060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • Archaeology in the Digital Age

    In the 21st Century, digital tools are as integral to archaeological research as the trowel and the field notebook. This course combines essential training in digital archaeology with critical discussions of how digital methods are impacting the conceptual dimensions of archaeological research. Topics include topographic survey, GNSS, tablet-based recording systems, database design, digital photogrammetry, and intermediate level archaeological GIS. Demonstrated proficiency in ArcGIS or open-sourced GIS software (the equivalent of an introductory course, preferably Anthropology 1201) and previous archaeological field experience are prerequisites.
    ANTH 2201 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Anthropological Demography

    A seminar devoted to the investigation of the interface of anthropology (especially sociocultural anthropology) and demography. A wide variety of demographic topics-fertility, mortality, marriage, migration-are considered, and the links between anthropological and demographic writings on and approaches to these areas are examined.
    ANTH 2300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Flores
  • Anthropology of War and Violence in the Archaeological Past

    This course is an overview of anthropological archaeological approaches to war, violence, and peace. We will begin by reviewing past and current social scientific thinking on the past six million years of human war and violence. We will consider in greater detail how anthropological archaeologists conduct research regarding ancient war and violence. Special attention will be given to the role of war and violence in statecraft and the (de)construction of society. We will consider some of the methodologies employed in the study of ancient violence including, landscape archaeology, art and iconography, and bioarchaeology.
    ANTH 2580 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Linguistic Theory and Practice

    An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language and social life. We begin by examining semiotic approaches to language. We turn to classical research on language as a structured system - covering such topics as phonology and grammatical categories - but we focus on the implications of such work for broader social scientific and humanistic research. We then consider areas of active contemporary research, including cognition and linguistic relativity, meaning and semantics, pronouns and deixis, deference and register, speech acts and performativity, interaction, verbal art and poetics, reported speech, performance, and linguistic ideology.
    ANTH 2800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    American Studies
    AMST 1700I Community Engagement with Health and the Environment
    Education
    EDUC 1038 Contemporary Indigenous Education in North America
    Ethnic Studies
    ETHN 1890H Introduction to American Indian Studies
    History
    HIST 0150D Refugees: A Twentieth Century History
    International Relations
    INTL 1803D Questioning Growth: Should Nations Get Rich?
    Urban Studies
    URBN 1870S The City, the River, and the Sea: Social and Environmental Change at the Water's Edge
    ANTH XLIST 0