Courses for Spring 2017

  • Contemporary Egypt in Revolution

    On January 25, 2011 protestors in Egypt amassed in Tahrir Square in Cairo with basic demands: Bread, Freedom, Social Equality, and Human Dignity. After hundreds of peaceful protestors were killed at the hands of riot police and hired thugs, eighteen days later, President Husni Mubarak resigned. Yet since then, hundreds more have been killed, Egypt's revolution continues, and the basic demands are as crucial today as they were at its inception. We will read contemporary Egypt from the perspectives of anthropologists and social historians, and discuss the value of social theory and analysis for understanding current political turmoil. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. DPLL FYS. S/NC
    ANTH 0066S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • The Anthropology of Gender and Science

    This seminar examines topics including genetics, reproduction, and evolution, all through the lens of gender/sex systems. The themes of social justice, identity, and difference are central to the course. We will explore: How epidemiology and engendered social justice are often in conflict in the fight against AIDS in Africa; to learn about difference, anthropomorphism, gender, and primatologists’ comparisons between humans, bonobos, and chimpanzees; efforts to scare men in the United States about "Low Testosterone," and how they reflect shifting identities as much as reduced hormone levels; and the relationship between gender, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Western Biomedicine in China. SOPH DPLL
    ANTH 0077N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own. No prerequisites. WRIT DPLL
    ANTH 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Culture and Health

    An introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Lecture reading and discussion will examine the social context of health and illness, looking at the diverse ways in which humans use cultural resources to cope with disease and develop medical systems. The course will provide an introduction to the overall theoretical frameworks that guide anthropological approaches to studying human health related behavior. Medical anthropology offers a unique and revealing perspective on the cultural diversity that characterizes human experiences of sexuality, disease, aging, mental illness, disability, inequality and death. DPLL WRIT
    ANTH 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Human Evolution

    Examination of theory and evidence on human evolution in the past, present and future. Topics include evolution and adaptation, biocultural adaptation, fossil evidence, behavioral evolution in primates, human genetic variation and contemporary human biological variation.
  • Anthropology of Food

    An exploration of the human experience of food and nutrition from evolutionary, archaeological, and cross-cultural perspectives. The course will review the various approaches employed by anthropologists and archaeologists to understand diet and subsistence in the past and present. Starting with the evolutionary roots of the human diet in Plio-Pleistocene Africa, we will trace patterns of human subsistence to the present, including the social and health implications of the agricultural revolution. We will then explore modern foodways in cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the interplay of ecology, politics, technology, and cultural beliefs. WRIT
    ANTH 0680 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Classic Mayan Civilization

    Examines the history, culture, and society of the Classic Maya, with special emphasis on Preclassic precursors, dynasties, environmental adaptation, imagery, architecture, urban form, and the Maya Collapse.
    ANTH 1031 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Global Sport: Anthropological Perspectives

    Sport operates within vast networks of political, economic, and social investment. But who controls sport, and how? In this course, we approach sport as a set of labor practices. Modern sport is inseparable from the history of British and European industrialization. With an emphasis on the power of institutions, we analyze why sport has taken certain technical forms and social significances. We investigate the historical and cultural constraints through which the body is disciplined. Students will undertake writing projects about sport and that enable them to experience the challenges and opportunities of transforming athletics into text.
    ANTH 1050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sherouse
  • Indigenous Archaeologies

    This is an intro. to Indigenous archaeology, sometimes defined as archaeology "by, for and with Indigenous peoples." These approaches combine the study of the past with contemporary social justice concerns. However, they are more than this. In addition to seeking to make archaeology more inclusive of and responsible to Indigenous peoples, they seek to contribute a more accurate understanding of archaeological record. They thus do not reject science, but attempt to broaden it through a consideration of Indigenous epistemologies. This course covers topics as the history of anthropological archaeology, Indigenous knowledge and science, decolonizing methodologies, representational practices and NAGPRA. DPLL
    ANTH 1125 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East

    An introduction to ethnographic studies of Middle East, focus on: religion, language, modernity, gender, and political culture. Students will engage in critical examination which anthropologists sought to capture Middle Eastern life, and problems that have pervaded anthropological representation, methodologically and theoretically. You will learn, through the ways anthropologists approach the peoples, ideas, and cultures of the region in ways that complement and contradict the knowledge production of other disciplines, the processes we come to understand cultural difference, and ways this encounter sheds light on our selves and practices. Previous course in Anthropology/ Middle East studies is suggested. Enrollment limited to 25. DPLL
    ANTH 1151 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Daulatzai
  • Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis

    This course offers an introduction to the concepts and techniques of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Through weekly lab assignments and work on independent projects, students develop skills in cartography and coordinate systems, spatial database design, image processing, basic spatial analysis, hydrological modeling, and three-dimensional modeling. Discussions and case material draw primarily from the application of GIS in archaeology, anthropology, and cultural geography, including the study of archival materials and the ethics of geographic representation. Provides foundation for upper division coursework in spatial analysis. Software focuses on ESRI products (ArcMap, ArcScene, ArcCatalog, ArcGIS Pro).
    ANTH 1201 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Violence and the Media

    The role of media in shaping perceptions of violent conflict. Analysis of constructions of the "violent other", "victims", and "suffering", the use of culture, ethnicity, and psychopathology as tropes for articulating the motivations of violent perpetrators. Multiple subject positions and political interests will be considered. Case studies include the Cold War, conflicts, insurgencies urban riots, the genocide, and terrorism. Pre-requisite: a previous course in Anthropology, or permission of the instructor.
    ANTH 1251 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Anthropology of Homelessness

    Homelessness emerged as a public concern in the United States and in other industrialized countries in the late 1970s as people began encountering people living on the streets, a way of life which had formerly been confined to the skid rows of large cities. In this course, through readings, readings, discussion, and hands on experiences with homeless populations, we will uncover the causes, conditions, and responses to homelessness. Each student will spend at least two hours per week in a local homeless-serving agency in order to gain face to face experiences. The field placements will be facilitated by the professor.
    ANTH 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Stratified Reproduction: Race, Class and Parenthood

    This Engaged Scholar course will examine the social, cultural, and economic dynamics that guide and shape the process of becoming a parent in the context of deepening global and national inequalities. In addition to reading widely in relevant social science literature, students will embed themselves in one of the many local organizations in Providence and the broader New England area that provide services for new mothers and fathers in need. The course is limited to 15 students admitted to the class via an application process. Priority given to seniors, those in the Engaged Scholars Program, and Anthropology concentrators. DPLL
    ANTH 1312 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • ISIS, NAGPRA, and the Academy: Archaeology and Global Issues in Cultural Heritage

    These days cultural heritage is all over the news. The wars in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, and Libya have led to the destruction of countless sites and museums, and the looting of artifacts on a massive scale. Cultural heritage is a broad term however, and there are people and institutions around the world that have stakes in how it is defined and managed. How then do archaeologists, museum specialists, and others in the academy define, work with, and protect cultural heritage? This course will explore current themes in cultural heritage with an eye to material culture and ethical action.
    ANTH 1580 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Randall
  • Global Historical Archaeology

    The course examines historical archaeology as a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the historic past. Draws in recent research from different parts of the world, including North America, South Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, and South America, to illustrate historical archaeology's contributions to interpreting peoples' everyday lives and the diversity of their experiences in the post-1500 era.
    ANTH 1620 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Material Culture Practicum

    Combines theory with hands-on study of artifacts from historical archaeological contexts in North and Latin America. Students will gain skills and experience in artifact identification, dating, recording, analysis, and interpretation, and will conduct individual or team research projects on material things as products of everyday life and history. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ANTH 1621 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols

    Examination of the key role played by symbols in politics. We examine symbols, myths, and rituals used to win support, create political reality, and form political groups, whether in defense of the status quo or creating movements seeking to overthrow it. The 2016 U.S. presidential, congressional, state, and local political campaigns receive attention. Students, in part working in groups, will engage in original research both on the 2016 American elections and a wide variety of historical and contemporary political developments, from ISIS and the Arab Spring to the American anti-abortion movement. Prerequisites: two previous courses in anthropology.
    ANTH 1910G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
  • Ethnographic Research Methods

    To understand the different theoretical assumptions that shape research efforts; to examine how hypotheses and research questions are formulated; and to appreciate the ethical and scientific dimensions of research by hands-on experience in fieldwork projects. Prerequisite: One Anthropology course. WRIT
    ANTH 1940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    A seminar exploring fundamental theoretical and ethnographic currents in 20th- and 21st-century cultural anthropology.
    ANTH 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Methods of Anthropological Research

    A seminar on the methodological problems associated with field research in social and cultural anthropology. Designed to help students prepare for both summer and dissertation research.
    ANTH 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
  • Infrastructure, Inequality and Ignorance

    This seminar provides an introduction to three literatures: those on infrastructure, inequality, and knowledge/ignorance. We will examine the concepts as distinct ones as well as in relation to their overlapping concerns. Cases are drawn from a wide variety of mainly contemporary settings around the world. The emphasis will be on ethnographic and textual approaches to the issues. Appropriate for graduate students from across the social sciences.
    ANTH 2055 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
  • Anthropology Dissertators' Seminar

    This seminar is for post-field graduate students in residence at Brown who are at any stage of writing their dissertations. It is intended to support dissertators by providing a structured community, providing a setting for sharing goals, and workshopping writing.
  • Critical Ethnographies of Race and Indigeneity

    This is a seminar intended for graduate students in anthropology and related fields. Over the course of the seminar, we will examine the ways anthropologists have attended to issues of race and indigeneity in diverse ethnographic contexts. We will read and discuss classic and contemporary ethnographies that explore such issues such as race and science, colonialism and post-colonialism, imperialism, structural racism, social movements, violence, performance, and whiteness. Interested seniors with at least three semesters of anthropology coursework will be required to present a writing sample to apply for an instructor override. For further info. contact Kay Warren.
    ANTH 2205 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
  • Issues in Anthropology and Population

    This seminar is intended for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows interested in anthropological approaches to population issues. The overarching theme of the seminar is the contributions that sociocultural anthropology can make to the understanding of population processes.
    ANTH 2304 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reynolds
  • Lived Bodies, Dead Bodies: The Archaeology of Human Remains

    Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from archaeological contexts. We will survey the "state of the art" in bioarchaeology, while exploring its relevance and application to the archaeology of complex societies. We will survey a range of bioarchaeological methods and applications, including paleopathology, stable isotope analysis, population affinity/ancient DNA, perimortem trauma, and body modification. In turn, we will explore how bioarchaeology can be used to approach a wide range of archaeological problems relative to complext societies, including subsistence, economy, migration, urbanism, social inequality, conflict and warfare, and identity. Open to graduate students only. S/NC.
    ANTH 2560 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Space, Power, and Politics

    This course critically examines the politics of space and landscape from an interdisciplinary perspective. After reading key texts in political philosophy and cultural geography, we explore themes in recent scholarship including the spatial production of sovereignty, capital, and political subjectivity and the evolving role of digital cartography in public culture and politics. Case studies are drawn from archaeology, art history, ethnography, cultural geography, and history.
    ANTH 2590 S01
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
  • Linguistic Theory and Practice

    An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language and social life. We begin by examining semiotic approaches to language. We turn to classical research on language as a structured system - covering such topics as phonology and grammatical categories - but we focus on the implications of such work for broader social scientific and humanistic research. We then consider areas of active contemporary research, including cognition and linguistic relativity, meaning and semantics, pronouns and deixis, deference and register, speech acts and performativity, interaction, verbal art and poetics, reported speech, performance, and linguistic ideology.
    ANTH 2800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sherouse
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Archaeology and the Ancient World
    ARCH 1546 The Monuments Men: Embedded Scholars and the Military-Archaeology Complex
    ARCH 2105 Ceramic Analysis for Archaeology
    Education
    EDUC 0410A New Faces, New Challenges: Immigrant Students in US Schools
    EDUC 1270 Adolescence in Social Context
    English
    ENGL 2901F Around 1948: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Transformations
    Modern Greek
    MGRK 1210 A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience
    Russian
    RUSS 1550 Beyond the Kremlin: Russian Culture and Politics in the Twenty-First Century
    Sociology
    SOC 1127 Ethnographic Praxis in Industry
    SOC 1872T Social Innovation and Disruption: The Case of Modern Turkey
    ANTH XLIST 0