The Division of Applied Mathematics

About Us

Our proud graduates raise their hats on Graduation Day!Our proud graduates raise their hats on Graduation Day!Our mission rests in research, education, and scholarship. Our faculty engages in research in a range of areas from applied and algorithmic problems to the study of fundamental mathematical questions. By its nature, our work is and always has been inter- and multi-disciplinary. Among the research areas represented in the Division are dynamical systems and partial differential equations, control theory, probability and stochastic processes, numerical analysis and scientific computing, fluid mechanics, computational molecular biology, statistics, and pattern theory. Our graduate program in applied mathematics includes around 50 Ph.D. students, with many of them working on interdisciplinary projects. We offer undergraduate degrees in Applied Mathematics, Applied Math–Biology, Applied Math–Computer Science, and Applied Math–Economics. Our faculty actively involve undergraduates in summer research projects and offer many independent studies every year. 

The Division of Applied Mathematics is one of the most prominent departments at Brown, and one of the oldest and strongest of its type in the entire country. The Division had its origin in the program of Advanced Instruction and Research in Mechanics, established in 1941 on the recommendation of a committee of the National Research Council. This early program focused on solid and fluid mechanics, electromagnetic theory, mathematical methods in applied physics, numerical analysis and probability theory—the principal interests of the faculty for many years.  Since then the interests of the faculty have expanded and diversified, as the Division has maintained a leading role in the development of applied mathematics both in the United States and throughout the world. In 1964, for example, the Center for Dynamical Systems was established to coordinate the research of a large group of people working in ordinary and partial differential equations and their applications. More recently, programs at the forefront of research in scientific computing and in applied probability and statistics have been established.