Archaeology and the Ancient World Commencement Ceremony

Sunday, May 28th, 2017

Following the ceremony on Brown's Main Green.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

 

CANCELLED:
Materiality and the Missing Migrant: The Work of the Colibri Center for Human Rights
Chelsea Halstead (Colibrí Center for Human Rights)

Thursday, April 27th, 2017 at 5:30pm

Chelsea Halstead is unable to visit Brown University this April, so we regret that we must cancel her talk, and we apologize for any inconvenience.

 

Presentations of Senior Thesis Research in Archaeology and the Ancient World

Thursday, April 27th, 2017 at 4:00pm

Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, David Elitzer, Angela Marie Teng, and Charlotte Tisch, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations.
This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Archaeology DUG's End of the Year Social

Thursday, April 27th, 2017 at 3:30pm

The Archaeology & the Ancient World DUG will be hosting a social at 3:30 pm in Rhode Island Hall. All Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!
Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Basque Fishing along the North Atlantic: Capitalism, Mobility, Colonialism and Sensoriality
Sergio Escribano Ruiz (University of the Basque Country and JCB Research Fellow)

Thursday, April 27th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Sergio Escribano Ruiz is a Professor in Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and a Research Fellow at Brown University's John Carter Brown Library. He will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The (W)holy Story of Holes: Responses to a Looted Landscape
Morag Kersel (DePaul University)

Friday, April 21st, 2017 at 5:30pm

A lecture by Dr. Morag Kersel (DePaul University) on new approaches and reactions to cultural heritage preservation in the Middle East.
This is the final event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
New Stories on Old Buildings: Recent Work on the Architecture of the Chalcolithic Çatalhöyük West Mound
Jana Anvari (Flinders University)

Thursday, April 20th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Jana Anvari recently finished her PhD at Flinders University and will present her in-progress work on house use lives and building materials of the latest levels at Neolithic site Çatalhöyük in Turkey. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

North East Graduate Archaeology Workshop

Saturday, April 15th, 2017, 10:30am-5:15pm

The graduate students of the Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology and the Ancient World will be holding a graduate student workshop on April 15th, with the aim of encouraging dialogue between students, exchanging ideas, developing networks, and collaborating in the sharing of resources. The structure of the workshop will be very informal. This workshop is free, but preregistration is required. To RSVP and for questions please email: negaw17brown@gmail.com
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
From Soil to Society: Framing Land Use and Climate Change in the West Mediterranean during the 1st Millennium BCE
Samantha Lash (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, April 13th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Samantha Lash, doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch..
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Presentation of Dissertation Research:
The Social Life of Coins: Local Reactions to Roman Imperialism beyond the Frontier
Kathryn McBride (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology)

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Kathryn McBride, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

 

Princely Sites: Landscapes and a View from Above (Landscape Archaeological Approaches to Celtic Sites in Southern Germany)
Axel Posluschny (Keltenwelt am Glauberg)

Monday, April 10th, 2017 at 5:30pm

Axel Posluschny is the Head of the Research Centre of the Keltenwelt am Glauberg (World of the Celts at the Glauberg) in Germany and a Visiting Scholar in Archaeology and the Ancient World at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology. His work focuses on landscape archaeology, settlement archaeology, remote sensing, and other surveying techniques. He has been involved in the Fürstensitze & Umland project using geophysics and LiDAR scans to understand Iron Age landscapes in Europe, and more recently has played a leading role in the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project which aims for better use and appreciation of landscape archaeology tools like geophysics, aerial archaeology, satellite imagery, and LiDAR.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Migrant Materialities: From Greek Village to Greektown USA
Kostis Kourelis (Franklin & Marshall College)

Thursday, April 6th, 2017 at 5:30pm

Kostis Kourelis is Associate Professor of Art History at Franklin & Marshall College. Dr. Kourelis is an architectural historian specializing in archaeology, historic preservation, and architectural theory. His research also includes Byzantine studies, urbanism, modern Greek studies, and cultural studies.
This lecture is part of the "Materiality of Migration" series and is co-sponsored by Brown University's Modern Greek Studies Program and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The Theft and Trafficking of Cultural Objects from Syria
Neil Brodie (Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East & North Africa, University of Oxford)

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017 at 5:30pm

Neil Brodie is a Senior Research Fellow on the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa (EAMENA) project at the University of Oxford.
Brodie is an archaeologist by training, and has held positions at the British School at Athens, the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, where he was Research Director of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre, Stanford University’s Archaeology Center, and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research at the University of Glasgow. He has worked on archaeological projects in the United Kingdom, Greece and Jordan, and continues to work in Greece.
He has been researching the illicit trade in cultural objects since 1997. He was co-author (with Jennifer Doole and Peter Watson) of the report Stealing History, commissioned by the Museums Association and ICOM-UK to advise upon the illicit trade in cultural material. He also co-edited Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade (with Morag Kersel, Christina Luke and Kathryn Walker Tubb, 2006), Illicit Antiquities: The Theft of Culture and the Extinction of Archaeology (with Kathryn Walker Tubb, 2002), and Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World’s Archaeological Heritage (with Jennifer Doole and Colin Renfrew, 2001).
Brodie's visit is part of the year-long series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Manipulating Luxury? Understanding the Production and Distribution of Decorated Ancient Ostrich Eggs
Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol)

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 at 12:00pm

Tamar Hodos, Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Globalising the Mediterranean Iron Age
Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol)

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 at 5:30pm

Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. She is a specialist in the archaeology of the Mediterranean's Iron Age, a period that extends between c.1200-c.600 BCE, with particular interest in the impact of colonization, and the construction and expression of social identities. She is currently collaborating with the British Museum on a project that explores the role of luxury objects as expressions of status, power and authority in the first millennium BCE wider Mediterranean. The project seeks to understand the creation, circulation, use and purpose of luxury objects within a cross-cultural framework that examines how luxuries transcend cultural differences in Iron Age societies; an early example of globalization.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
From Roman to Byzantine: Shaping the Rural Landscape in Late Antique Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)
Catalina Mas Florit (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, March 16th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Catalina Mas Florit, Visiting Scholar in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Was There Ever a Neolithic in the Neotropics?
Eduardo Neves (Harvard University)

Monday, March 13th, 2017 at 12:00PM

Eduardo Neves is a CAPES Distinguished Visiting Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University and Professor of Archaeology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. His current area of research is southwestern Amazonia, at the current border of Bolivia and Brazil, where he has been studying middle Holocene occupations on fluvial shell mounds, as well as the archaeology of late pre-colonial mound building societies.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall,Room 108

 

“Actually, We Are Mongols!”: Ancestral Narratives and Identity Shifts Derived from Yuan Steles in North China, ca. 1400 to Today
Iiyama Tomoyasu (Waseda University)

Friday, March 10th, 2017 at 12:00PM

Dr. Iiyama is an Adjunct Researcher at Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Tokyo, Japan. He is an expert on medieval Chinese tomb epitaphs, genealogical steles, and other inscriptive practices. He has worked on northern Chinese social history during the Jin-Yuan-Ming and published Northern Local Literati: Civil Service Examination and Its Social Influence in North China, 1127-1368 (in Japanese) in 2011.
Drawing on stele inscriptions and interviews conducted during my recent epigraphic field researches in north China, this talk aims to shed light on a pattern of identity shifting before the Ethnic Classification Project (minzu shibie gongzuo) during the 1950s to 1960s. As Thomas Mullaney has empirically revealed in his Coming to Terms with the Nation, the ethnic demarcation drawn by the PRC exerted an enormous impact over social and cultural landscape in China, while it was conceptually and methodologically inspired by ethnographic works from the early twentieth century. How did people perceive and define themselves before the coming of “ethnicity”? Did they ever need to claim and change their “ethnic” identity? If so, how did they prove it? Combining epigraphic evidence and oral history, this talk demonstrates that genealogical inscriptions from the Mongol Yuan period (1234-1368) have functioned as an ongoing determinant in justifying and legitimizing one’s claims, as well as promoting the status of his descent group in local society. In the process, the memory of non-Chinese migration into north China in the Mongol empire has been renovated, manipulated, and generated by (re)interpreting the stele inscriptions over time, and occasionally by fabricating a stele. The resurgence of “original” Yuan ethnic identity took place during the late nineteenth century (when genealogy compilation diffused in the north), early twentieth century (when Chinese nationalism emerged), and today as the movement to “seek ancestral roots (xungen)” arose nation-wide. Taken together, the talk articulates the impact of Mongol rule in the historical narration of local ancestry, as well as the role of epigraphy in verifying ancestry in north China.
Sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Chen Family Fund, and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
The African Grey Parrot: A Global History
Nancy Jacobs (History, Brown University)

Thursday, March 9th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Nancy Jacobs, Professor of History at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Geoarchaeology: Sediments in Context
Cristiano Nicosia (Université libre de Bruxelles)

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017 at 5:30pm

Cristiano Nicosia received his Ph.D. in Natural and Environmental Sciences from the University of Milano (Italy) in 2012. He is currently a Researcher at ULB – Brussels and a freelance consultant in Geoarchaeology, soil micromorphology and archaeo-pedology.
This lecture is co-sponsored by the Institute at Brown for Environment & Society and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The ‘Kingdom of Idols': Recent Investigations at Tell Tayinat (Ancient Kunulua, Biblical Calno) in Southeastern Turkey
Stephen D. Batiuk (University of Toronto)

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 at 6:30pm

The interplay between the Hebrew Bible and the archaeological record has all too often been a contentious affair, greatly dependent on how one understands its compositional history, as well as the cultural and geopolitical context in which it was written. This talk presents the latest results of the University of Toronto’s excavations at Tell Tayinat, ancient Kunulua (Biblical Calno), located in the North Orontes Valley in the southeastern province of Hatay in modern day Turkey. The lecture will focus on the Iron II-III levels (9th to 7th Century) at the site, which record the changing fortunes of a Neo-Hittite Kingdom perched on the edge of the Assyrian Empire, and will explore how archaeological evidence from the Northern Levantine Royal city can shed light on the local history of a region, while also providing insight into the cultural environment in which the Biblical texts were written.
This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
What Have the Romans Ever Done for Us?
Axel Posluschny (Keltenwelt am Glauberg)

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 at 12:00pm

Axel Posluschny, Head of the Research Centre of the Keltenwelt am Glauberg (World of the Celts at the Glauberg) in Germany will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Is the Mediterranean's Seabed a Grave? Underwater Relics and the Reach of Relatedness
Naor Ben-Yehoyada (Columbia University)

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 at 5:30pm

Naor Ben-Yehoyada is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. His work examines unauthorized migration, criminal justice, the aftermath of development, transnational political imaginaries in the central and eastern Mediterranean, and he is specifically interested in the processes through which transnational regions form and dissipate. His forthcoming monograph, The Mediterranean Incarnate: Transnational Region Formation between Sicily and Tunisia since World War II, offers a historical anthropology of the recent re-emergence of the Mediterranean.
This lecture is part of the "Materiality of Migration" series and is co-sponsored by Brown University's Modern Greek Studies Program, Department of Anthropology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Summer Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 at 4:00pm

Is it too late to apply to do fieldwork this summer? How can you tell if a field project is well run and will be a positive experience? How can you pay for it?
Don't worry! There are still many, many opportunities for fieldwork this summer. Brown Archaeology professors Peter van Dommelen and Laurel Bestock will help guide you through the process of how to find a great field project in Europe, the Near East, South America, the United States, or wherever you may be interested in going.
Visit our "Fieldwork Opportunities" page, and download the Fieldwork Information Session 2016 Handout (Note: an updated handout will also be available at the meeting)
Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
An Authentic Fake: Appropriating Romanesque Architecture for Barcelona's 1929 International Exposition
Lia Dykstra (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017 at 12:00pm

Lia Dykstra, doctoral candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Heritage Museums and the Classical Past in the 21st Century
Nikolas Papadimitriou (Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens)

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 at 5:30pm

Modern museums owe a great debt to Classical Antiquity. Not only are they named after the Muses; their very character has been forged upon the logocentric view of the universe introduced by ancient Greek philosophers, and revived by the thinkers of the Renaissance and the European Enlightenment. Of crucial importance for the success of 19th century museums was their open, public character and their adherence to the (by then) revolutionary principles of critical thought, empirical knowledge, scientific research and the questioning of axiomatic ‘truths’.
Almost two centuries later, museums continue to thrive around the world, often promoting pioneering ways of perceiving the past. This is in contrast to Classical studies, which suffer a bleak recession, with academic positions diminishing rapidly and the number of students in Classics Departments falling abruptly. Why is it so? Why does academia fail where museums succeed? How do they differ in “treating the past”? And how can this divide be bridged?
In this lecture, Dr. Nikolas Papadimitriou, Curator of Antiquities at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, will review the history of museums, discuss the social and political conditions that allowed them to become broadly relevant to modern societies, and address the role of institutionalized education in the modern world.
Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Program in Modern Greek Studies.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Carvings in and out of Time:
Afterlives of Rock-Cut Monuments in the Ancient Near East

Wednesday, February 15th-Thursday, February 16th, 2017

From the moment rock-cut monuments were carved people have asked themselves who made them, when, and why? They are part of the natural landscape, yet are conspicuously anthropogenic. Many of them became part of the regional and cultural memory of their environs. They traverse cultural and chronological boundaries.
Our purpose is to study the monuments' successive re-interpretations and manipulations, their cultural recycling. The history of their re-interpretations exemplifies the intricate interaction of ancient cultures with their own, even more ancient, past. The result is a layered landscape of cultural meaning and natural transformations that can furnish precious evidence about the pre-modern archaeological imagination.
We aim to bring diverse specialists on the ancient world to Brown University to tackle the following questions: who in the pre-modern period was interested in rock-cut monuments? How did ancient interpreters make sense of their images and texts? And, how can we as contemporary scholars, begin to address such questions?
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
More information and full schedule at http://brown.edu/go/rockcutmonuments
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Hellenic Homelands: The Greek Diaspora, Ancient and Modern
Jonathan Hall (University of Chicago)

Friday, February 10th, 2017 at 5:00pm

Dr. Jonathan Hall is a Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities and Professor in the Departments of History and Classics and the College at the University of Chicago. His most recent book, Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian (Chicago, 2014), examines a series of case studies from the Greek and Roman worlds as part of a reflection on the relationship between documentary evidence and material culture. He is also the author of a series of articles and chapters concerning the early polis, Greek colonization, and cultural identities. Currently he is interested in nineteenth-century Greece and especially issues of cultural heritage in the newly independent kingdom.
This lecture is part of the 2016-2017 Mellon Graduate Workshop, "Colonial Entanglements: Land, Economy, and Connected Communities."
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

POSTPONED DUE TO SNOW!
Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Was There Ever a Neolithic in the Neotropics?
Eduardo Neves (Harvard University)

Thursday, February 9th, 2017 at 12:00pm

We regret that we need to reschedule this talk, due to weather concerns. We will post updated scheduling information when it's available.
Eduardo Neves, visiting faculty at Harvard University, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Archaeology Concentrators Welcome Back Lunch

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 from 12:00-1:00pm

All concentrators -- and prospective concentrators -- in Archaeology and the Ancient World are invited to enjoy some pizza and share stories of what they did over the winter break!
Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 109

 

Koutroulou Magoula Project Information Session

Friday, February 3rd, 2017 at 5:00pm

Brown University’s Yannis Hamilakis, Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies, has openings for multiple students to participate in his archaeological field project in Greece this summer (June 5-June 30, 2017). He is holding an informal infosession this Friday, for interested students to find out more about the project and how they might get involved. No previous field experience is required.
Koutroulou Magoula is a multi-period archaeological site in central Greece with the main period of occupation around 6000 BCE (Middle Neolithic period). There are also burials dating to the Bronze Age (1500 BCE), and the Medieval period (c. 1200 CE). It is a finds-rich site, with buildings surviving to more than 1 m. in height, pottery, lithics, animal bones, and an impressive corpus of more than 350 clay figurines. In addition to excavation, the field team will be carrying out ethnography, a theatre-archaeology program, and a series of community archaeology events.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 109

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
The Archaeology of the Aesthetic: Slavery and the Jesuit Vineyards of Nasca, Peru
Brendan Weaver (Berea College)

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 at 12:00pm

Brendan Weaver, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Berea College, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Working with the Military to Protect Cultural Property in Crisis Zones
Laurie Rush (United States Army, Fort Drum, NY)

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017 at 5:30pm

Dr. Laurie Rush is Cultural Resources Manager and Army Archaeologist at Fort Drum, NY. Dr. Rush is also a Board Member of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield.
This lecture is the second event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Karl Krusell, Alex Marko, and Martin Uildriks (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, January 27, 2017

Karl Krusell, Alex Marko, and Martin Uildriks, doctoral students in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will report on their Fall Proctorship activities in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Presentation of Dissertation Research:
Works in Progress: Regional Trends and Grassroots Developments in the Cities of Roman North Africa
J. Andrew Dufton (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology)

Monday, December 5th, 2016 at 10:00am

Andrew Dufton, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

 

Textualized Object and Objectified Text: Exploring the Boundaries Between Writing and Object in Early and Medieval China
Guo Jue (Barnard College)

Thursday, December 1st, 2016 at 5:30pm

Guo Jue is Assistant Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures and Co-Chair of the Columbia Early China Seminar at Barnard College. She received her Ph.D (2008) in Early China from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining Barnard, she was an Assistant Professor of Chinese Religions at Western Michigan University (2008-2013) and a visiting research fellow at the Cluster of Asia and Europe at Universität Heidelberg (2012-2013), Germany. She specializes in Early China, especially from the Warring States period to Han times (5th century B.C.E.-3rd century C.E.). Her research interests are primarily in ritual practices, material culture, and social, religious, and cultural history of early societies. Using both received history and archaeological sources, she is interested in looking at the intersection and interaction between writing and object, and studying topics including divination, death rituals, tombs and burials, and everyday life in early to medieval China from anthropological and historical perspectives, as well as the way they are theorized in comparative studies.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of History of Art and Architecture, Program in Early Cultures, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Material Girls in a Material World: Anthropomorphic Clay Figurines on Cyprus from 1750-750 BCE
Emily Booker (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, December 1st, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Emily Booker, doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The Destruction of Memory: A Film Screening and Q&A with the Director
Tim Slade (Vast Productions USA)

Monday, November 28th, 2016 at 6:00pm

Over the past century, cultural destruction has wrought catastrophic results across the globe. This war against culture is not over - it's been steadily increasing. In Syria and Iraq, the ‘cradle of civilization’, millennia of culture are being destroyed. The push to protect, salvage and rebuild has moved in step with the destruction. Legislation and policy have played a role, but heroic individuals have fought back, risking and losing their lives to protect not just other human beings, but our cultural identity - to save the record of who we are. Based on the book of the same name by Robert Bevan, The Destruction of Memory tells the whole story - looking not just at the ongoing actions of Daesh (ISIS) and at other contemporary situations, but revealing the decisions of the past that allowed the issue to remain hidden in the shadows for so many years. Interviewees in the film include the Director-General of UNESCO, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, as well as diverse and distinguished international experts, whose voices combine to address this urgent issue.
This screening is the first event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
List Art Building, Room 120

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Archaeology as History: 19th Century Ottoman Conceptualizations
Meltem Toksoz (Middle East Studies, Brown University)

Thursday, November 17th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Meltem Toksoz, Visiting Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

(News) Stories from the Middle East: Removed Artefacts, Recycling, and the Ethical Agenda against Illicit Trade
Mirjam Brusius (Oxford University)

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Mirjam Brusius is a Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow in the History of Photography, a post she holds in conjunction with the Bodleian Library, at Oxford University. She previously held Postdoctoral Fellowships at Harvard University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz. Her research addresses the intersection of modern history of science and the history of European and Islamic art. It centres on the history of photography, museums, collecting, and scientific voyages in and between Europe and the Middle East.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Center for Middle East Studies, Department of History of Art and Architecture, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina
Benjamin Alberti (Framingham College)

Thursday, November 10th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Benjamin Alberti, Chair and Professor of Sociology at Framingham College, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, "Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The Deviant Daughters of Miletus: Foundation Traditions in Ionia
Naoise Mac Sweeney (University of Leicester)

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Naoise Mac Sweeney is Associate Professor in Ancient History at the University of Leicester, specialising in the study of ethnicity, identity and migration. She has published widely in the fields of ancient history, archaeology, race relations, international development and peacebuilding studies, and she is the author of Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013). She has also pursued her research interests through archaeological fieldwork in Turkey, in particular as part of the Kilise Tepe Archaeological Project.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Playing with Fire: Experimental Neolithic Cooking in Cyprus
Andrew P. McCarthy (Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, and University of Edinburgh)

Monday, November 7th, 2016 at 5:30pm

The Neolithic period in Cyprus had a range of site-types (permanent village, hunting camp, seasonal inhabitation, ritual centres, etc.) and mobility must be considered a factor in the use of the landscape. Without many more excavated sites, however, it is difficult to examine the relationships between sites of different type and their place in the landscape. The Neolithic remains at Prasteio Mesorotsos have recently revealed two cooking installations that can shed light on both mobility and sedentism and possibly provide the fulcrum between the various types of sites that we know about. One feature is a domestic -scale domed oven, which reflects the cooking habits of the inhabitants that resided at this location for at least some part of the year. Another feature is a remarkable large-scale pit oven that would have been capable of feeding a great many people, more than is presumed for a single community. These two features provide contrasting habits that reflect the interactions between mobile (possibly hunting or pastoral) groups and seasonal sedentary populations. In particular, the pit-oven can be thought to have been used in feasts that gathered multiple communities into a single place. In order to understand these activities, in 2015 and 2016 an experimental project was conducted reconstructing the the pit oven and a large feast was organized for local communities in order to test hypotheses about the labor involved in production, the number of people that could have been fed and the possibilities for inter-community interaction.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts
Laura Hawkins (Egyptology and Assyriology, Brown University)

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Laura Hawkins, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Egyptology and Assyriology at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk, titled, "Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Archaeology DUG Meet and Greet

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 at 5:00pm

The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group will be hosting a social at 5pm, following the Fieldwork Info Session, in RI Hall. All Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!
Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

 

Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 at 4:00pm

Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What's an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad?
Download the Fieldwork Information Session 2015 Handout (Note: an updated handout will also be available at the meeting)
Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

 

Prisoners of War: Durham and the Fate of the Scots in 1650
Durham University, UK

Thursday, October 27th, 2016 at 7:30pm

Archaeologists from Durham University, UK, will tell the fascinating history of how prisoners from a seventeenth century battle between England and Scotland came to Massachusetts. Transported to the US as indentured servants, some of the men went on to become successful farmers and there are now hundreds of descendants of these soldiers living in New England and beyond. The talk will also set out the research methods used by the archaeologists on human remains, discovered during construction of a new café at Durham University in 2013. This research has helped solve the almost 400-year-old mystery of where hundreds of soldiers, who died whilst held captive in Durham, were buried. #ScotsSoldiers
Sponsored by Durham University Department of Archaeology (@ArcDurham).
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Excavating China’s First Archaeologist
Jeff Moser (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)

Thursday, October 27th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Jeff Moser, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, "Excavating China’s First Archaeologist". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

If Venice Dies
Salvatore Settis (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016 at 7:00pm

What is Venice worth? To whom does this urban treasure belong? Internationally renowned art historian Salvatore Settis urgently poses these questions, igniting a new debate about the Pearl of the Adriatic and cultural patrimony at large. Venetians are increasingly abandoning their hometown—there’s now only one resident for every 140 visitors—and Venice’s fragile fate has become emblematic of the future of historic cities everywhere as it capitulates to tourists and those who profit from them. In If Venice Dies, a fiery blend of history and cultural analysis, Settis argues that “hit-and-run” visitors are turning landmark urban settings into shopping malls and theme parks. He warns that Western civilization’s prime achievements face impending ruin from mass tourism and global cultural homogenization. This is a passionate plea to secure the soul of Venice, written with consummate authority, wide-ranging erudition and élan.
Salvatore Settis is chairman of the Louvre Museum’s Scientific Council and former director of the Getty Research Institute of Los Angeles and the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Departments of Italian Studies and History of Art and Architecture, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

 

International Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, I
Joukowsky Institute Open House: Archaeology in Action

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016, 11:00 AM-3:00 pm

Come visit the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World in Rhode Island Hall. See ancient coins, human and animal bones, precious metals, ceramics, and other artifacts. Tour one of the oldest buildings on Brown’s campus. And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

 

International Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, II
Archaeology of College Hill Community Archaeology Day

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016, 11:00 AM-3:00 pm

Watch Brown undergraduates digging (yes, really digging!). This year, as part of ongoing work on Brown's campus and in the surrounding neighborhoods of College Hill, students will be excavating at the nearby Moses Brown school. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what we're up to or try your hand at digging. All are welcome!
Moses Brown School, 250 Lloyd Avenue (Excavation at the corner of Hope Street and Lloyd Avenue)

 

The Chariot of the Sun-God: Technological Innovation and Near Eastern Cult Practice
Mary Bachvarova (Willamette University)

Thursday, October 20th, 2016 at 6:30pm

Mary Bachvarova is Professor of Classics and Department Chair of Classical Studies at Willamette University. She co-edited The Fall of Cities in the Mediterranean: Commemoration in Literature, Folk-Song, and Liturgy, and is the author of From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Greek Epic.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Agency Sits in Places: Arctic Ecology and Modern Ideology in the Bering Strait, 1840-1980
Bathsheba Demuth (History, Brown University)

Thursday, October 20th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Bathsheba Demuth, Assistant Professor of History and Fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Postcolonial Pontus: Indigenous-Colonial Relations in Northern Anatolia from the Early Colonial Encounters to the Fall of Mithridates VI
Owen Doonan (California State University Northridge)

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016 at noon

Owen Doonan is Associate Professor of Art in the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program at California State University Northridge. He focused on early Sicilian Architecture and society in his PhD (1993) at Brown University’s Center for Old World Archaeology and Art. Since 1996 he has led the Sinop Regional Archaeological Project, a regional study of archaeology, culture and environment in the Sinop Province, northern Turkey. He has authored one book (Sinop Landscapes: Exploring Connection in the Hinterland of a Black Sea Port), edited another and published more than forty articles relating to the archaeology of the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. In 2010 he co-founded the New Sahara Gallery in Northridge, the first Los Angeles area gallery to specialize in the contemporary fine art of the Middle East and North Africa.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Çaltılar Archaeological Project: Discovering Ancient Lycia
Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol)

Monday, October 17th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. She is a specialist in the archaeology of the Mediterranean's Iron Age, a period that extends between c.1200-c.600 BCE, with particular interest in the impact of colonisation, and the construction and expression of social identities. Until 2012, she co-directed the Çaltılar Archaeological Project, a collaboration between Bristol, Liverpool and Uludağ (Turkey) Universities. This project, based in the south-western Turkish region of Lycia, examined the role this area played with the Aegean, Greek and wider Mediterranean worlds during the Bronze and Iron Ages. She is the author of the book, Local Responses to Colonization in the Iron Age Mediterranean, and co-editor of Material Culture and Social Identities in the Ancient World.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Megalomania at Sea: The Recovery of Hellenistic Naval Architecture during the Renaissance
Lilia Campana (Texas A&M University)

Thursday, October 13th, 2016 at 6:30pm

During the Renaissance, Italian humanists attempted to recover the maritime golden age of ancient Greece and Rome. In resurrecting ancient warships, humanists looked at the most magnificent period in maritime history, the Hellenistic Age (323-31 B.C.), which produced a burst of unprecedented proportions resulting in warships of increasingly large size that eventually came to replace the trireme. Since no archaeological remains of ancient warships were available and have yet to be found, the study of ancient texts was crucial to the recovery of ancient naval architecture. Based on the study of several Renaissance naval treatises and unpublished archival sources, two shipbuilding projects are known: the quinqueremis built in 1529 by the Venetian humanist Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), and the grandiose and yet completely unknown attempt in 1570 by the erudite Filippo Pigafetta (1533-1604) to recover the design of the tessarakonteres of Ptolemy IV Philopator (r. 221-204 B.C.), the biggest ship ever built in the ancient Mediterranean. Both Fausto and Pigafetta believed that the knowledge of ancient texts was centrally relevant to the design of their ships and to the solution of practical problems of naval architecture in the material world.
This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Archives Are Archaeological Objects
Sophie Moore (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, October 13th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Sophie Moore, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Next Steps: Information Session on Applying to Graduate School and Searching for Jobs in Archaeology and Classics

Thursday, October 6th, 2016 at 4:00pm

A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.
View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/undergrad/grad.html
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

The Phoenicians and the Making of the Mediterranean (8th-7th centuries BCE): A View from Tartessos
Carolina López-Ruiz (Ohio State University)

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Carolina López-Ruiz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding Greek culture in its broader ancient Mediterranean context, particularly looking at cultural exchanges and processes of integration and adaptation in Near Eastern and Greek interaction. She edited Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: A Sourcebook of Greek, Roman, and the Near Eastern Myths in Translation (2014) and is the author of When the Gods Were Born: Greek Cosmogonies and the Near East (2012), as well as many other publications.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Zooarchaeological and Genetic Evidence for Cattle Domestication in Ancient China
Katherine Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, September 29th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Katherine Brunson, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Gods of Egypt: See the Movie... Then Think About It

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 at 7:00 pm

A free screening of the movie Gods of Egypt, on a giant screen, with surround sound! Followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie.
And free popcorn! Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
Salomon Hall, Room 001

 

Visibility, Place, and Movement: Ancient Egyptian Images and Their Contexts
John Baines (Oxford University)

Monday, September 26th, 2016 at 5:30pm

John Baines is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology and Fellow of The Queen's College at the University of Oxford, where he taught from 1976 to 2013. His principal areas of interest are Egyptian art, literature, religion, self-presentation, the position of writing in Egyptian society, and modelling social forms. He is currently working on elite uses of the wider environment, particularly in forms and practices, such as hunting, that must be approached indirectly because they leave little physical trace.
Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

State of the Field 2016:
The Archaeology of Egypt

Friday, September 23rd-Saturday, September 24th, 2016

State of the Field 2016: The Archaeology of Egypt is a two-day workshop, focusing with the ways in which boundaries are being broken in Egyptian archaeology -- temporally, geographically, methodologically, and politically. This workshop is meant to highlight the ways in which the field is still struggling in each area, how it can improve, and why it needs to do so.
Keynote:
Stuart Tyson Smith (University of California, Santa Barbara)
"Entanglements: Egypt and Nubia, Anthropology and Egyptology"

Session Participants:
Elizabeth Bolman
Pearce Paul Creasman
Monica Hanna
Gregory Marouard
Gerry Scott
Neal Spencer
Josef Wegner
Willeke Wendrich

Full schedule available at https://brown.edu/go/egypt2016. Updates on Twitter and Facebook using #sotfegypt.
Free and open to the public. No pre-registration required.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2016 Archaeological Field Seasons
Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Andrew Scherer, Peter van Dommelen, and Parker VanValkenburgh

Monday, September 12th, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Professors Sheila Bonde, John Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Andrew Scherer, Peter van Dommelen, and Parker VanValkenburgh will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in Greece, France, Montserrat, Mexico, Italy, and Peru.
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology's
Welcome Back (to the Trenches) Reception

Friday, September 9th, 2016, 5:00-7:00 pm

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall