• Martina Rugiadi, Associate Curator of Islamic Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will present a talk entitled Expanding the Field, Disrupting Canons: Iranian Ceramics, Trade, and Collecting Practices. Kept in storage until recently, the Minassian collection of Iranian ceramics defies expectations of what Iranian art is supposed to be. In this lecture, Martina Rugiadi will explore how trade and collecting patterns from the late nineteenth century onwards have shaped canons and (literally) fashioned objects visible in museums. Immersing ourselves in this often dismissed past is critical for expanding the field and disrupting received notions of history and art.
    Co-sponsored by History of Art & Architecture, John Hay Library, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, and Middle East Studies.
    More Information Arts, Performance, Humanities
  • Dr. Candace Rice is an Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on Mediterranean maritime trade and economic development during the Roman period. She is particularly interested in exploring what the archaeological record reveals about the ways in which connectivity changed the nature of the Roman economy through enhanced supra-regional integration and specialized local economic development. Dr. Rice is also an active field archaeologist and has excavated at Etruscan, Samnite, Roman, and Medieval sites in Italy, France, and Tunisia, and spent considerable time at Roman and Late Antique sites in Turkey. She currently co-directs the Upper Sabina Tiberina Project, focused on the excavation of a late Republican to mid Imperial villa in the Sabina and, as part of this project, runs the University of Alberta Archaeological Field School in Italy.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • The Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project: An interdisciplinary field project in central Greece

    Yannis Hamilakis
    Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies ([email protected])

    Koutroulou Magoula is a multi-period archaeological site (a tell - artificial mound) in central Greece, which is becoming increasingly known internationally due to its astonishing preservation and its diverse and unusual material record, as well as the pioneering archaeological and ethnographic methodologies adopted in its exploration. The main period of use of the site is the Middle Neolithic (c. 6000-5800 BCE) when it was a habitation settlement; in the Late Bronze Age (c. 1500 BCE) the site was used for burials, and an elaborate tholos (bee-hived) tomb was constructed at the top of the mound, next to the Neolithic buildings. In the 12th c. CE the site was used again for burials, and an inhumation burial of a young woman was excavated by our team.

    Since 2009 the site is being explored as part of the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography interdisciplinary project, under my co-direction. The project relies on the participation of a large number of scholars and other specialists, including anthropologists, geoarchaeologists, archaeobotanists, archaeozoologists, organic residue specialists, ceramic petrographers, bioarchaeologists and physical anthropologists, soil micro-morphologists, computing application specialists, even performance artists and theatre specialists. Three Universities are currently participating with students and specialists in this project: Brown, University College London (UCL), and National University of Taiwan, in addition to individual scholars from many institutions around the world.

    Through this detailed interdisciplinary work, we have unearthed a very elaborate settlement with extremely well preserved, stone and mud brick buildings, occupied by a community which was engaged in large scale communal projects, including terracing and the construction of large, perimeter ditches around the settlement. This community also produced and used impressive material culture, including clay figurines, c. 500 of each have already being unearthed and studied, one of the largest such collections from the Neolithic of South Eastern Europe. They are extremely diverse in terms of technology, form, and decoration, and they often depict hybrid human-animal beings or entirely fantastic entities.

    The project has the potential to rewrite the archaeology of the Balkan and European Neolithic, given its unique features, preservation, and interdisciplinary nature of our work.

    Excavation dates for 2019: mid June to mid-July
    Info meeting: 13 December 4.30 pm, RIH 008.

    Deadline for expression of interest (inc. bio, and an idea of an independent project): 23 December 2018

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  • Dec
    12
    11:00am - 1:00pm

    Reading Period Break with the DigDUG

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm Atrium

    The Archaeology DigDUG is serving up cookies and hot chocolate in the atrium of the Joukowsky Institute from 11 AM to 1 PM. Please stop by and take a break from studying or writing! 

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  • On December 11, Rev. Lysander Dickerman, D.D., Class of 1851 (portrayed by Sean Briody ’19), will lecture on “The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt,” one of his world famous Egyptological lectures illustrated with stereopticon views. The lecture will be presented exactly as it was when Dr. Dickerman spoke before an audience of Brown University students on January 4, 1893. The event will take place in Rhode Island Hall, Room 108 at 1:30 pm. A short discussion about Dickerman, the field of Egyptology, and “Egyptomania” in the Victorian era will follow. Open to the public; all are welcome!
    This event serves as the final project for an Independent Study with Professor Laurel Bestock.

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  • Dr. Laura Banducci, Assistant Professor in Greek and Roman Studies at Carleton University, is an archaeologist, with a particular interest in the Roman republican period and in the Etruscan civilization of central Italy. Her research focuses on three principal areas: diet and dining practices, collectively referred to as ‘foodways’; how artefacts were made, used, re-purposed and discarded; and entertainment and leisure culture. Her research is grounded in the idea that an individual’s daily behavior, as reflected by the material record, can provide important insights into large-scale societal changes in the ancient world. She is currently completing a book that investigates the foodways of several sites in central Italy.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dec
    7
    All Day

    Geologics: Comparative Epistemologies of the Earth

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm 108

    This symposium explores “geologics”: systems of thought that have accounted for the relation between humans and what modern scientists consider geological features (caves, volcanos) and geomorphological processes (weathering, erosion, deposition). Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, we mobilize the insights of the literary and visual arts, archaeology, anthropology, and history to excavate deep histories and sculpt speculative futures of the earth.

    Information on participants, and abstracts.

    Sponsored by the Hsiao Family Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Program in Early Cultures, Joseph Edinburg Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and the Brown Arts Initiative.

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  • Karen Carr, Associate Professor Emerita in the Department of History at Portland State University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dr. Andrea Brock is a Lecturer in Ancient History in the School of Classics at the University of St. Andrews. Her work integrates the literary record on early Rome with new archaeological evidence, in order to produce an environmental and topographical reconstruction of Rome’s river valley. As director of the Forum Boarium Project, she has conducted a coring survey of the city’s original river harbour and harbour sanctuary. Among other findings, her research is revealing new insights on the effects of environmental stress—in particular frequent flooding and rapid sedimentation in the river valley—on Rome’s urbanization process.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Nov
    30
    11:00am

    Presentation of Dissertation Research by Jen Thum

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm 108

    Jen Thum, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, “Words in the Landscape: The Mechanics of Egyptian Royal Living-Rock Stelae”, in a public lecture. All are welcome.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research
  • Praveena Gullapalli, an Associate Professor in Anthropology at Rhode Island College, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Liana Brent is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Cornell University. She is the recipient of a two-year Andrew W. Mellon Foundation / Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (2017-2019). Her dissertation, Corporeal Connections: Tomb Disturbance, Reuse, and Violation in Roman Italy, examines post-depositional skeletal manipulation in reopened and reused inhumation graves throughout Roman Italy. She conducts archaeological fieldwork in southeast Italy as the assistant director of the Vagnari Cemetery excavations, where she has excavated since 2011.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Surekha Davies, an InterAmericas Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nov
    13
    4:30pm - 5:30pm

    Opening Reception - Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm Atrium

    Join us for the opening reception of Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018, an exhibit of photographs taken by Fotis Ifantidis at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece and curated by Professor Yannis Hamilakis and undergraduate students Justin Han and Kelley Tackett.

    Koutroulou Magoula was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.

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  • Dr. John W.I. Lee is an Associate Professor at the UCSB Department of History. He studies the history of ancient West Asia with a focus on war and culture in the Greek and Achaemenid world from ca. 650-330 BC. He is currently writing two books: one about Civil War and Revolt in Achaemenid Persia; and another about John Wesley Gilbert (1863-1923), the first African American to attend the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the first African American to receive an advanced degree from Brown (Class of 1888).

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • Nicholas Emlen, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library and a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Walter Crist is a Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History and a Visiting Researcher in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. His research focuses on Bronze Age Cypriot, Egyptian, and Near Eastern board games and their roles in intercultural transmissions and as social lubricants and enablers in communities.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Jennifer Bates, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Georgia Andreou, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.

    View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/undergraduate/life-after-brown

    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Oct
    20
    11:00am - 3:00pm

    Archaeology of College Hill Community Archaeology Day

    Moses Brown School (Hope St & Lloyd Ave)

    Come be part of an active archaeological excavation! Students will be digging on the grounds of Moses Brown School (next to Brown’s athletic center), uncovering the foundations of a 19th century home and processing artifacts from that household. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what artifacts students are discovering or even try your hand at digging.

    Moses Brown School (Excavation at the corner of Hope St and Lloyd Ave)

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • See ancient coins from Greece and Rome up close! Touch human and animal bones! Examine and draw Persian and Roman ceramics, prehistoric tools, precious metals, and other artifacts from thousands of years ago – coached by experts!  And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

    More Information Family Weekend, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Oct
    19
    All Day

    Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm Atrium

    Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018


    Photography by Fotis Ifantidis
    Curated by: Yannis Hamilakis, Justin Han, Kelley Tackett


    An exhibit of photographs taken at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece, a site which was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.


    Archaeologists use photographs all the time, primarily for the purposes of recording and documentation. In the field, many other, non-official, “social” photographs and snapshots are taken, which rarely become part of the archaeological story. There is, however, a third kind of photographic-archaeological production: photographs that comment visually on the process of archaeology, on excavation and on field practices, photographs which are at the same time artistic creations but which can also operate as photo-ethnographic objects; as one of the outcomes of the archaeological process which can be disseminated in various ethnographic contexts, and provoke and elicit responses and reactions that can lead to further reflection and research. This is the kind of photography we exhibit here. In doing so, we foreground the archaeological site not only as a site of research and education but also as a site of cultural and artistic production.

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  • Lauren Yapp, a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Robert Preucel, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Haffenreffer Museum at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk titled, “The Predicament of Ontology”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Philosophy, Religious Studies
  • Oct
    10
    5:30pm

    Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm 108

    Where can you do archaeological fieldwork this summer?  How can you pay for it?  How do you apply?  What’s an UTRA grant?  Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer?  What courses should you take to prepare?  Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator?  What is fieldwork, anyway?  And what about study abroad?

    Joukowsky Institute faculty will provide an overview on how students can get involved in archaeological fieldwork this summer.  We will discuss how to find and choose a project and how to find funding, and then lead a more general discussion on what to expect on a fieldwork project and what kinds of preparation might be necessary.  Open to all interested students.

    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Oct
    4
    3:30pm - 5:00pm

    Archaeological Illustration Club

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm Mezzanine (Third Floor)

    Learn to produce technical illustrations

    Handle ancient objects close up

    Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

    No experience or artistic confidence necessary

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  • Gretel Rodríguez, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Philosophy, Religious Studies
  • Dr. Kathryn Sampeck is an an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Illinois State University. Her research interests historical archaeology, archaeology of Spanish colonialism, political economy, ethnohistory, food history.

    In this lecture, Dr. Sampeck asks: What was daily life like for Cherokees just at the moment when groups of people from across the Atlantic—Spaniards and Africans—started to become part of their world? A tour of one settlement, Cowee, lets audience members understand what Cherokee homes, communities, and networks of communities were like and the kinds of activities that were important to peoples’ lives. Each example is based on archaeologically-recovered information as well as community history and knowledge. This visit shows what an important historical moment this time was for Cherokees and colonists alike, why these settlements are places of enduring importance, and how Cherokee peoples were crucial in early colonial encounters and subsequent political and economic developments.

    This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is part of the AIA’s Nadzia Borowski Lecture series.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • Sep
    25
    7:00pm

    Tomb Raider: See the Movie...Then Think About It...

    Salomon Center for Teaching, Rm 001

    See Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander), the daughter of an eccentric adventurer, embark on a perilous journey to a fabled tomb on a mythical island in an attempt to solve the mystery of her father’s disappearance – on a giant screen, with surround sound! The movie will be followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie. And free popcorn! Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities