News Archive from March, 2019

Graduate student Emily Monty will speak at Frick Collection

On Saturday, April 6, PhD candidate, Emily Monty will be representing Brown University at "A Symposium on the History of Art" presented by The Frick Collection and The...

The Medieval Cyborg featured in The Brown Daily Herald

Michelle Oing '07 recent talk, The Medieval Cyborg: Performing Objects in the Late Middle Ages was featured in the April 8th edition of the Brown Daily Herald. Her talk argued for a more critical understanding of medieval and early modern conceptions of mimesis through an examination of a range of figural objects: bust reliquaries, moveable sculptures of Christ and the saints, mobile effigies, and puppets and automata. Her lecture was part of the yearlong, Sensory Series, presented through the Department of the History of Art and Architecture. The event took place on April 4 at 5:30 pm in List 120.

April 6 and 7: The Allure of the Ancient

The Department of Egyptology and Assyriology will present a two-day conference, "The Allure of the Ancient: Early Modern Receptions of the Ancient Near East on April 6 and 7 in Rhode Island Hall.

Sensory Series Continues in Spring 2019

April 4 at 5:30 pm in List 120
Michelle Oing '07, Yale University
The Medieval Cyborg: Performing Objects in the Late Middle Ages

Michelle Oing ’07 is a PhD candidate in the History of Art Department at Yale University. She received her B.A. in Art History from Brown University and her M.T.S. in the History of Christianity from Harvard Divinity School. She will discuss aspects of her dissertation which argues for a more critical understanding of medieval and early modern conceptions of mimesis through an examination of a range of figural objects: bust reliquaries, moveable sculptures of Christ and the saints, mobile effigies, and puppets and automata. 

April 15 at 5:30pm in List 110
Niall Atkinson, University of Chicago  The Wandering Body and the Wondering Eye: Italian views of Cairo in Early Modern Travel

Niall Atkinson, Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago researches the soundscapes of Renaissance Florence and the role of the acoustic environment in the meaning of built space and the construction of social communities.

The department's yearlong series explores the specific relationships between the senses and art, as well as methods for sensory scholarship. The series is sponsored by the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, the Anita Glass Memorial Fund, the Margerie Cutler Endowment, and the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of Fine Arts.