Proposals to the CCC

CCC Proposals

As part of its broader charge to "examine, evaluate, and approve all educational offerings" in Brown’s undergraduate curriculum, the College Curriculum Council approves new courses and programs of study, including concentrations, certificates, degree options (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science), and optional or required tracks, as well as substantive modifications to existing programs of study. 

I. New Courses

See guidelines and additional information and deadlines.

II. Proposing Changes to Existing Academic Programs

Online Form to Propose Concentration/Certificate Changes


Proposals to modify concentration or certificate requirements (including changes to the core and elective courses and honors requirements) should be submitted via online form
, ideally in the fall term for publication in the following year's University Bulletin by its February deadline.

Proposals should explain the rationale for the proposed change(s), any pertinent data or other information that helped motivate the change and/or supports the rationale, any known potential consequences of the change (intended and unintended, including impact to course enrollments, etc.), the desired implementation date for changes (e.g., "beginning with students who declare in spring 2019"), and a table with the current and the proposed concentration/certificate requirements. 

Proposals are reviewed by the Executive Committee and, depending on the nature of the proposal, a decision might be rendered or the matter may be discussed and voted on at a meeting of the full CCC. In some cases, faculty are invited to the Executive Committee or the full CCC to address related questions. 

III. Proposing New Academic Programs

Online Form to Propose a New Academic Program


Academic units should carefully review the CCC Guidelines for New Undergraduate Concentrations or New Undergraduate Certificate Programs prior to submitting the Proposal for a New Undergraduate Academic Program.

Proposals for jointly administered concentrations (i.e. concentrations proposed by more than one department or program) and for concentrations housed in non-departmental units (e.g. interdisciplinary centers) must adhere to additional requirements to ensure appropriate oversight and advising structures, and these are published in the New Concentrations Guidelines linked above.