Resources

THE CLINICAL AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE LABORATORY (CLANlab) 

Dr. Willoughby Britton and Dr. Jared Lindahl


The CLANlab researches the effects of contemplative practices on cognitive, emotional, and neurophysiological processes in both clinical and non-clinical settings. CLANlab investigates the link between contemplative practices, brain function, and affective disturbances, such anxiety, depression and substance abuse. 

The lab also investigates the effects of contemplative education programs in middle school and university students (in comparison to music and dance training). The lab is conducting a 5-year NIH-funded study that compares the effects of different meditation practices on brain function and emotional wellbeing. 

The lab is also the home of the Varieties of Contemplative Experience project, which investigates the range of experiences associated with meditation, and in particular those reported as unexpected, difficult or distressing.

For a sampling of publications of Dr. Britton and her student research assistants, see the Scholarly Works page on this website or visit the lab website here.

 

DR. CATHERINE KERR

THE TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE LABORATORY 


The Kerr Lab http://mindinbodylab.org/ looks at the ways in which contemplative practices such as mindfulness and taiji change the brain and the nervous system. The lab specifically focuses on the ways in which contemplative practices that engage body-focused attention bring about specific changes in brain synchrony and corticomuscular coherence. The goal of our studies is to understand how practices such as mindfulness and taiji bring about changes at multiple levels in the brain and body. This knowledge is directly relevant to treatments for chronic pain and depression and disorders related to aging.

For a sampling of Dr. Kerr's research see the Scholarly Works page in this website or go to the above link for the Kerr Lab.