New Faculty and Conference Publications

  • New from Our Faculty

    The Pasts of Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons

    In this volume, Felipe Rojas examines how the inhabitants of Roman Anatolia interacted with the physical traces of earlier civilizations in their midst. Combining material and textual evidence, he shows that interest in and knowledge about pre-classical remains was deep and widespread. Indeed, ancient interaction with the remnants of even more ancient pasts was a vital part of life for many and diverse people in Roman Anatolia.

  • New from Our Faculty

    Scholars and Scholarship in Late Babylonian Uruk

    This volume, edited by Christine Proust and John Steele, explores how scholars wrote, preserved, circulated, and read knowledge in ancient Mesopotamia. It offers an exercise in micro-history that provides a case study for attempting to understand the relationship between scholars and scholarship during this time of great innovation.   

  • New from Our Faculty

    Keeping Watch in Babylon: The Astronomical Diaries in Context (Brill, 2019)

    Editors: Johannes Haubold, John Steele, and Kathryn Stevens

  • New from Our Faculty

    Violent Rituals of the Hebrew Bible (Oxford University Press, 2019)

    Although seldom studied by biblical scholars as a discrete phenomenon, ritual violence is mentioned frequently in biblical texts, and includes ritual actions such as disfigurement of corpses, destruction or scattering of bones removed from a tomb, stoning and other forms of public execution, cursing, forced depilation, the legally-sanctioned imposition of physical defects on living persons, coerced potion-drinking, sacrificial burning of animals and humans, forced stripping and exposure of the genitalia, and mass eradication of populations.

  • New from Our Faculty

    Antiquities and Classical Traditions in Latin America (Wiley, 2018)

    This collection is the first concerted attempt to explore the significance of classical legacies for Latin American history – from the uses of antiquarian learning in colonial institutions to the currents of Romantic Hellenism which inspired liberators and nation-builders in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.