Growth Lab

Growth Lab:

Thursday 9:00 - 10:00 am

Robinson Hall , Room 301

2/8/2018

Balazs Zelity - Brown

Age Diversity and Economic Growth

2/15/2018

Jonathan Schultz - Harvard, Evolutionary Biology

Why Europe? The Churches' Ban on Consanguineous Marriages, Kin-networks, and Democracy

3/1/2018

Phillip Ager - University of Southern Denmark

Structural Change and the Fertility Transition in the
American South

3/08/2018

 

Louis Putterman - Brown

"Studying Cultural Differences in Cooperation and Trust with Incentivized Experiments"

3/12/2018

Monday

Paul Sharp - University of Southern Denmark

Getting to Denmark: The Role of Elites for Development

3/15/2018

Matt Delventhal - Autonoma, Barcelona

The Globe as a Network: Geography and the Origins of the World Income Distribution

3/22/2018

Ori Katz - Tel Aviv

"The Effect of Economic Development on Fertility and Human Capital: Evidence from the US Railway Expansion"

4/04/2018

PSTC

Diego Ramos - Brown

Segregation and Solidarity: The effects of Leper Colonies on Social Capital"

4/05/2018

Mario Carillo - Brown

Fascistville: Mussolini's New Towns and the Persistence of the Extreme Right

4/12/2018

Andreas Irmen - Luxembourg

"The Supply of Hours Worked and Endogenous Technological Change"

4/19/18

Juan Rodriguez - Madrid

"Opportunity and the Idea Production Function: The Nobel Prize Experience

4/26/2018

 

Greg Casey - Brown

"A Multi-factor Uzawa Growth Theorem and Endogenous Capital-Augmenting Technological Change"

5/03/2018

Niles-Peter Lagerlof - York

"The Surplus Theory Revisited"

5/4/2018

12:00-1:00

*Special Date*

Ömer Özak

Borderline Disorder: (De facto) Historical Ethnic Borders and Conflict in Africa

Abstract.
This research explores the effect of historical ethnic borders on conflict in Africa. We document that both the intensive and extensive margin of contemporary conflict is highly spatially concentrated in the proximity of historical ethnic borders in Africa. Using cell-level analysis at the 100 x 100, 50 x 50, 25 x 25 and 10 x 10 kilometers, our OLS estimates suggest that locations close to a historical ethnic border are between 15 and 20 percent more likely to experience conflict events. The results are robust to within-country and within-ethnicity analyses, as well as to the accounting for a large set of geographical confounders and other sources of conflict studied in the literature. Additionally, given the potential for mismeasurement of historical ethnic borders, we follow a simple instrumental variable approach, which suggests an even larger effect of historical ethnic borders on the prevalence and intensity of conflict in Africa. 

5/09/2018

 

Guillaume Blanc - Brown

Change and persistence in the Age of Modernization: Saint- Germain-d'Anxure, 1730-1895 (with Romain Wacziarg)