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Policy Resources: Questions on Personnel Support

  1. Who are the personnel that need to be uniquely qualified to work with English language learners?

  2. What rules or legislation about qualified ELL staff apply to my school or to me?

  3. How does a school district access professional development for ESL?

  4. Where are the jobs in ESL?

  1. Who are the personnel that need to be uniquely qualified to work with English language learners? 

    The following service-providers may be affected by statutory requirements relating to ESL instructional credentials:

    • Bilingual teachers
    • ESL teachers
    • Content area teachers
    • Paraprofessionals (aides, education technicians, translators)
    • Culture brokers (parent liaisons)
    • Counselors
    • Social workers
    • Program evaluators


  2. What rules or legislation about qualified ELL staff apply to my school or to me?

    If your school receives Title I federal funds under the No Child Left Behind Act (and most do), then review the requirements for quality of paraprofessional teaching personnel in programs supported under Title I. See the guidance for B-1, B-19, and E-11 from the following PDF file found at:
    http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/paraguidance.pdf 

    If your school receives Title III federal funds under the No Child Left Behind Act, then the following requirement applies to your school district. Go to page 10 of the PDF document, "Title III - Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students," to review the requirements for quality of teaching personnel in programs supported under Title III: 
    http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/legislation/nclb/nclb-iii.pdf 

    If your school benefits from any federal funds, the Policy Update on Schools' Obligations Toward National Origin Minority Students With Limited-English Proficiency (LEP students) memorandum issued in 1991 by the U.S. Office for Civil Rights, applies to your school district: With regard to qualified staff, this memorandum stipulates:

    "Districts have an obligation to provide the staff necessary to implement their chosen program properly within a reasonable period of time. Many states and school districts have established formal qualifications for teachers working in a program for limited-English-proficient students. When formal qualifications have been established, and when a district generally requires its teachers in other subjects to meet formal requirements, a recipient must either hire formally qualified teachers for LEP students or require that teachers already on staff work toward attaining those formal qualifications."
    http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/lau1991.html

    To access your state's department of education website and learn about its policies and requirements in addition to the federal statutes and guidance that apply to quality of ESL personnel, click here:http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/policy/states/ 

  3. How does a school district access professional development for ESL? 

    There are many opportunities available to schools across America to assist them in providing ESL coursework, institutes, and workshops, as well as licensures for ESL professionals. Most common sources are the following:

    • Colleges and universities within your state may have resources to support professional development in ESL. To find out what ESL teacher education programs are available, visit:
      http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/resfor/preteachers/teachered/
    • TESOL, Inc. sponsors a national conference and several institutes. Information is available at:
      http://www.tesol.org/careers/programs/index.html
    • Recipients of NCLB Title III professional development grants for FY 2002 may be found at:
      http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/oela/grants/fy2002/
    • Education Equity Centers provide schools with regional training that is responsive to the needs of language minority children. There are also other regional centers that provide related training, such as comprehensive regional resource centers, regional laboratories, technology consortia, and parent resource centers. To find locations for centers like these that serve your state, you may download a national compilation of Technical Assistance Providers in NCELA's Technical Assistance Network Directory at:
      http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/expert/TA/tan/directory.htm


  4. Where are the jobs in ESL? 

    Among the better places to locate ESL positions are the following:

    • For a comprehensive collection of ESL postings around the globe, visit this Internet job search site:
      http://www.uni.edu/riedmill/
    • Many job listings in countries around the world may be found at
      http://www.ESLFocus.com/
    • If you're a member of TESOL, visit http://www.tesol.org/. Click on "Job Finder" to view jobs and to post résumés on-line for free. JobFinder is a Web-based job search application that includes many useful features, such as the ability to conduct advanced searches, apply for jobs on-line, and attach formatted CVs and other documents to on-line job applications. The candidate's identity remains confidential on the résumé. With JobFinder, employers have immediate access to a resume without having to request it by mail. The service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, from anywhere in the world that has access to the Internet.
    • "Mark's ESL World" at http://marksesl.com/JobBoard/index.pl is another ESL site that offers an international ESL jobs posting feature.
    • Don't overlook teacher-training colleges and university teacher placement offices as ways of learning about vacancies in your state.
    • The classified section of the Sunday edition of major newspapers is still a reliable source for locating ESL positions.
    • Consider, too, postings by state department of labor career centers at their regional locations or directly on the Web.