Courses for Spring 2020

  • Senior Seminar

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    EGYT 1920 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Rutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Bestock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Steele
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    EGYT 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    EGYT 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    EGYT 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • History of Egypt II

    A survey of the history and society of ancient Egypt from the Ramesside Period to the Roman conquest (ca. 1300-30 BC). Readings include translations from the original documents that serve as primary sources for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian history.
    EGYT 1440 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
  • Introduction to Coptic

    Coptic, the last stage of the ancient Egyptian language, was written with essentially Greek alphabetic characters. An introduction to Sahidic, which is perhaps the best represented of the Coptic dialects. Sahidic grammar is explained, and some texts, mainly of a biblical and patristic nature, are read. Open to undergraduates with the consent of the instructor. No prerequisites, but a knowledge of Middle Egyptian or Greek would be helpful.
    EGYT 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
  • The Pyramids in Context: Archaeology of Life and Religion of Death in Old Kingdom Egypt

    No ancient world monument is more iconic than the Egyptian pyramids of Giza. This ONLINE course sets out to be a comprehensive analysis of the Old Kingdom (2575-2150 BCE) pyramids and the material, historical and symbolic context that produced them. How and why were the pyramids built? What was inside them? How was everyday life in the pyramid towns? What kind of rituals were performed in their multiple chambers? This course wants to show the real face of the pyramids and the people who worked on and lived by them.
    EGYT 0500 S01
    This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Learn what it is like to take an online course at Brown and view technical requirements at: http://brown.edu/go/whatisonlinelike
    Primary Instructor
    Almansa Villatoro
  • Life on the Nile: Ancient Egypt beyond the Pharaohs

    The history of ancient Egypt is marked by the names of their great pharaohs and monumental buildings. But what about ordinary people who made up the majority of this fascinating culture, yet are not well represented in historical narratives? This course will explore what we know about the daily life of non-royal Egyptians by looking at the primary texts (in translation), art, and material culture of ancient Egypt. We will look at various categories of population, such as children, craftsmen, women, soldiers; and discuss such issues and topics as households, growing up, family, education, love, clothing, medicine, magic, and leisure.
    EGYT 1465 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stubnova
  • Ancient Voices: The Literature of Ancient Egypt

    In 1800 BCE, the ancient Egyptian writer Khakheperreseneb declared that he could not write anything new because everything had already been said. By then, ancient Egypt had already established a complex body of literature that continued to develop over the next several millennia. This course examines literary, religious, historical, and philosophical writings from ancient Egypt, ranging in date from 2400 to 250 BCE, in order to investigate how those texts can enrich our understanding of Egyptian culture and how they relate to broader literary traditions from the ancient world. Selected texts include adventure tales, love poetry, myths, and autobiographies. No prerequisites.
    EGYT 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Geoga
  • Readings in Ancient Egyptian

    Advanced readings in ancient Egyptian texts in the original script and language. Readings will be selected from a particular genre, historical period, or site. This course is intended primarily for graduate students and may be repeated for credit. A reading knowledge of ancient Egyptian is required. A reading knowledge of both German and French is strongly recommended but not required.
    EGYT 2300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Motte
  • Introduction to Classical Hieroglyphic Egyptian Writing and Language (Middle Egyptian II)

    Continuation of a two-semester sequence spent learning the signs, vocabulary, and grammar of one of the oldest languages known. By the end of this introductory year, students read authentic texts of biographical, historical, and literary significance. The cornerstone course in the Department of Egyptology - essential for any serious work in this field and particularly recommended for students in archaeology, history, classics, and religious studies. Prerequisite: EGYT 1310.
    EGYT 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen