Nonfiction Writing Courses Spring 2018

These course descriptions are for ENGL0900, 0930, 1030, 1050, 1140, 1160, 1180, & 1190 for Spring 2018.

For all other English course descriptions, see our 2017-18 Course Prospectus for fall 2017 and spring 2018.

ENGL 0900 (formerly 0110) CRITICAL READING AND WRITING I: THE ACADEMIC ESSAY
An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students. Spring section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0900, Sec 01 CRN24509
Reserved for first-year students only
E Hour, MWF 12-12:50 pm
Robert Ward
In its various forms, the essay allows scholars to put forward ideas and arguments, to shift ways of seeing and understanding, and to contribute to ongoing intellectual debate. This course offers an introduction to the style and purpose of writing and gives you the opportunity to work on three essay forms. You will read and discuss an eclectic range of personal and academic essays and participate in workshops, critical reviews, and symposia. You will develop an understanding of the techniques of scholarly work and acquire academic skills that will enable you to engage successfully with the challenges and opportunities of studying at Brown. S/NC.

ENGL0900, Sec 02 CRN24510
AB Hour, M/W only 8:30-9:50 am
Robert Ward
See description for Sec 01, above. S/NC.

ENGL0900, Sec 03 CRN24511
F Hour, MWF 1-1:50 pm
Ali Madani
An introduction to college-level writing, this course helps students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, hone skills of organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a diverse range of texts in media, literature, and contemporary politics. Assignments progress from personal and narrative response papers to formal academic, research-oriented essays. S/NC. 

ENGL 0930 (formerly 0180) INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION
Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on literary journalism, personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for ENGL 1180. Writing sample may be required. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students and sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomores only. Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students. Spring section 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomores only. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 01 CRN24988
C Hour, MWF 10-10:50 am
Adam Golaski
Our creative nonfiction course will consider what nonfiction means, especially in light of the idea that what is true, i.e. what is not fiction, is entirely subjective. We'll explore several varieties of the creative nonfiction essay—memoir, lyric essay, and essays about crime—by reading and writing together. Through class discussion, workshops, and one-on-one meetings, we will develop your writing and critical reading, skills ultimately producing a set of essays rendered with your singular voice. May serve as preparation for ENGL1180. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 02 CRN24989
F Hour, MWF 1-1:50 pm
Adam Golaski
See description for Sec 01, above. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 03 CRN24990
Reserved for first-year students
H Hour, T/Th 9-10:20 am
Kate Schapira
How can nonfiction also be creative? In this course, we'll look at writing that's inventive rather than invented, examining and imitating the tactics writers use and the risks they take to convey what happened, what's happening, and what they hope or fear will happen. Writing and rewriting (reportage, cultural critique, literary response, opinion, memoir) will form a key part of the course, and students will rework a number of pieces for a final portfolio. Authors considered include, but are not limited to, Antjie Krog, Richard Feynman, M.F.K. Fisher, James Thurber, Naomi Klein, John Lahr. May serve as preparation for ENGL1180. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 04 CRN24991
Reserved for first-year and sophomore students
D Hour, MWF 11-11:50 am
Ed Hardy
This workshop will explore the range of narrative possibilities available under the umbrella term "creative nonfiction." We'll be looking at questions of structure and technique in a number of subgenres including: the personal essay, literary journalism, travel writing, science writing and memoir. Student work will be discussed in both workshops and conferences. At the semester's end students will turn in a portfolio with several polished shorter pieces and one longer essay. May serve as preparation for ENGL1180. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 05 CRN24992
Reserved for first-year and sophomore students
B Hour, MWF 9-9:50 am
Elizabeth Rush
In this course, you will write three creative nonfiction essays in the following genres: memoir, lyric, travelogue. Each of these essays will be uploaded to a course-run website, and will be workshopped according to how the essay appears online. As creative nonfiction, the works you will write in this course are to be connected to actual affairs in the world and they are expected to appear as art, as motivated by something beyond the simple desire to transmit information. While creative nonfiction writers cannot conjure up events they wished had happened but they can create formal structures that allow the reader to gain insight into real events they might not have otherwise had. May serve as preparation for ENGL1180. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL0930, Sec 06 CRN24993
E Hour, MWF 12-12:50 pm
Elizabeth Rush
In this course, you will write three creative nonfiction essays in the following genres: memoir, lyric, travelogue. Each of these essays will be uploaded to a course-run website, and will be workshopped according to how the essay appears online. As creative nonfiction, the works you will write in this course are to be connected to actual affairs in the world and they are expected to appear as art, as motivated by something beyond the simple desire to transmit information. While creative nonfiction writers cannot conjure up events they wished had happened but they can create formal structures that allow the reader to gain insight into real events they might not have otherwise had. May serve as preparation for ENGL1180. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC. 

                   NONFICTION WRITING INTERMEDIATE

ENGL 1030 (formerly 0130) CRITICAL READING AND WRITING II: THE RESEARCH ESSAY
For the confident writer. Offers students who have mastered the fundamentals of the critical essay an opportunity to acquire the skills to write a research essay, including formulation of a research problem, use of primary evidence, and techniques of documentation. Topics are drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, the arts, and the sciences. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1030A, The Thoughtful Generalist CRN24518
*ONLINE*
Elizabeth Taylor
This *ONLINE* section of "ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research" will prepare you for academic and real-world discourse. In Canvas, you will discuss essays demonstrating deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. You will research and revise four explanatory, analytical, persuasive essays, using varied sources to explore subjects or issues of your choice. Mandatory peer reviews and conferences ONLINE and in person. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Learn what it is like to take an online course at Brown and view technical requirements at: http://brown.edu/go/whatisonlinelike

ENGL1030C, Writing Science CRN24502
G Hour, MWF 2-2:50 pm
Carol DeBoer-Langworthy
This course explores how science, as an academic way of thinking and a method, affects our critical thinking and expression of culture. Readings examine the various dialects of scientific discourse. Students write three major research essays on self-selected scientific topics from both within and outside their fields of study. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC. 

ENGL 1050 INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION
For the more experienced writer. Offers students who show a facility with language and who have mastered the fundamentals of creative nonfiction an opportunity to write more sophisticated narrative essays. Sections focus on specific themes (e.g., medicine or sports; subgenres of the form) or on developing and refining specific techniques of creative nonfiction (such as narrative). Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1050A, Narrative CRN24503
G Hour, MWF 2-2:50 pm
Ed Hardy
This course offers a broad exploration of the many kinds of essays you can write in creative nonfiction. We will be looking at how authors structure their pieces and the range of narrative techniques they often use. You can expect workshops, in-class prompts and readings by Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris and others. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1050H, Journalistic Writing CRN24504
(reserved for first-year and sophomore students only)
AB Hour, M/W only 8:30-9:50 am
Thomas Mooney
This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on "hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1050N, Writing for Today's Electronic Media CRN24505
J Hour, T/Th 1-2:20 pm
Jonathan Readey
This course introduces students to the practice of reporting for television news, radio, and their online equivalents--online news and podcasts. Exploring the world of communications for contemporary media, the course features hands-on work in writing news, features, and opinion pieces for television, radio, online news, and podcasts. Students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, revising, and workshopping in these media. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC. 


                     NONFICTION WRITING ADVANCED

ENGL 1160  SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM

For advanced writers. Class lists will be reduced after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Enrollment limited to 12 or 17, depending on section. S/NC.

ENGL1160F, Reporting Crime and Justice CRN24500
M Hour, Mon 3-5:30 pm
Tracy Breton
Crime and justice stories are people stories. The drama of everyday life is played out every day in courtrooms. This advanced journalism course will get students into the courtrooms, case files and archives of Rhode Island's judicial system and into committee hearings at the State House where they will report on stories that incorporate drama, tension, and narrative storytelling. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G, ENGL1050H or ENGL1160A (Advanced Feature Writing). Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC. 

ENGL 1180  SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE NONFICTION

For the advanced writer. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1180B, Digital Nonfiction CRN24501
M Hour, Mon 3-5:30 pm
Michael Stewart
In this class, we will join the host of other artists, activists, and writers that have used Twitter bots, iPhone apps, virtual reality experiences, and more to tell compelling stories. No previous digital writing experience is necessary, however, as an advanced creative nonfiction class, Digital Nonfiction requires students to have completed ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.

ENGL1180C, Writing with Food CRN24506
Mon/Wed only 10:00-11:20 am
Carol DeBoer-Langworthy
This course examines writing about food and how writing affects food and food culture. We shall explore the relationship of food to the pen through reading classic texts, writing in and out of class, guest lectures, and touring culinary archives. The goal is to polish personal voice in menus, recipes, memoir, history, reportage, and the lyric essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1180H, Satire and Humor Writing CRN24497
Thursday 4-6:30 pm
Jonathan Readey
For the advanced writer. This course will introduce students to the practice of writing satire and humorous essays. Readings will include works by Jonathan Swift, Mark Twain, Garrison Keillor, Bill Bryson, David Foster Wallace, David Sedaris, and others, and students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, and workshopping in the genre. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1180K, The Art of Literary Nonfiction CRN24498
K Hour, T/Th 2:30-3:50 pm
Catherine Imbriglio
For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC. 

ENGL 1190 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NONFICTION WRITING

For the advanced writer. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

ENGL1190S, Poetics of Narrative CRN24499
D Hour, MWF 11-11:50 am
Lawrence Stanley
Narratives are everywhere, simply there, like life itself, Roland Barthes says; we structure our experiences with narratives that we either infer or create. We will read different literary genres to see how narratives work and what makes them poetic and read theoretical texts to understand narrative function and performance. We will write experimentally to experience how stories are constructed. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0900, 0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.

ENGL1190V, Languages of Conscience: Slave Narratives, Prison Writing, and Abolition
CRN24507
N Hour, Wed 3-5:30 pm
Kate Schapira
We'll read and respond to nonfiction writings that arise from chattel slavery in the U.S and one element of its afterlife, the prison system: their goals, their styles, their strategies. Writings will include analytical and creative responses to these works. The Center for Slavery and Justice will be a resource for us. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. S/NC.