Courses for Spring 2018

  • Devils, Demons, and Do Gooders

    Who hasn't struggled with the problem of good and evil? Who hasn't wondered what lurks in the dark recesses of the soul? We will investigate how Milton, Mary Shelley, Melville, Poe, and Hawthorne, among others, grapple with these fundamental questions of judgment.
    ENGL 0100F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Writing War

    Examines the challenges that war poses to representation, and particularly to language and literary expression in the modern era. We will focus primarily on the First and Second World Wars, exploring the specific pressures war puts on novels and poetry, as well as on history, psychology, and ethics. Works by Sassoon, Owen, Hemingway, Woolf, Rebecca West, Graham Greene, Pat Barker, Tim O'Brien, Georges Perec. Students should register for ENGL 0100M S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • City Novels

    This course examines 20th and 21st century novels to consider how these narratives envision the city, its possibilities and limits. How does the city shape how we think, wander, grow up, see and know each other? How does the city divide people? How does the novel imagine ways to bridge those divisions? Readings by Woolf, Chandler, Wright, Cisneros, Smith, Calvino, Adiga, Whitehead.
    ENGL 0100N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Love and Friendship

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? This course poses this question in various ways. How, for instance, can we tell the difference between love's various forms—between love that is friendly and love that is romantic? How do the different forms of love differently shape people? How does love work when it involves sex, or marriage, or children, or divinity? And what must love involve to be called “good”? Why? Materials will range from Plato and St. Augustine to Leo Bersani and Allen Bloom and will also include popular filmic representations of love. Limited to 20. FYS
    ENGL 0150E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will likely include Baldwin, Brontë, Condé, Conrad, Faulkner, Greene, Ishiguro, Lessing, Morrison, Naipaul, Salih. Limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL FYS
    ENGL 0150X S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Unrealism: Science Fiction and Speculative Literature

    What can other worlds and other species tell us about how we see our own? This course will explore issues of gender, sexuality, technology and identity across sci-fi and fantasy literature, in addition to comics, TV and film. Texts will likely include: China Mieville, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany; Sandman, Doctor Who, Star Trek, Sense8. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0200X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cunniff
  • Graphic Memories: Form and Representation in the Contemporary Graphic Novel

    How do graphic novels tell stories—whether personal or historical—through their visual-literary form? This course critically examines the representation of identity and difference, traumatic memory, and perspectival experience within memoir and documentary genres. May include works by: Alison Bechdel, Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi, Shaun Tan, Keiji Nakazawa, and Lynda Barry; Butler, Barthes, and Cathy Caruth. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0200Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Grandy
  • Who Are You to Judge? Modernist Fiction and Judgment

    Literature both judges and is judged. It features scenes of judgment, and calls on readers to judge and interpret it. This course examines the ways in which early twentieth-century texts scrutinize ethical assumptions, form verdicts, and interrogate the position from which one judges. Authors: Melville, Kafka, Nabokov, Ford, Hurston, Ishiguro, Wright, Brecht, and Larson. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0200Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Krowiak
  • Discourse/Intercourse: Recognizing Desire in Novels and Film

    Sexuality and sex are not the same, although they are often mistaken for one another. Focusing on realist fiction and media, psychoanalysis, and Marxist theory, this course investigates novels and films that leave something to be desired. Can art create a space for desire to exist? Works by: Foucault, Freud, Lacan, Althusser, Flaubert, Hardy, Barnes, Kubrick, Lynch, others. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0201A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ramamurthy
  • Wrong Girls: Unwelcome, Unnerving and Undesirable Genders

    Unpleasing women appear throughout fiction: this course will address novels, films and critical theory from the Victorian to the contemporary which align the nasty, the ugly and the unwelcome with gender. Authors and critics include Eliot, Brontë, James, Ford, Atwood, Tan, Barthes, Butler, hooks and Gilbert & Gubar. Films include Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?, Rosemary’s Baby and Princess Mononoke. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0201B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rowe
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • The Nineteenth-Century British Novel

    A study of major novelists of the period, through the question: How did the novel develop as a form of social understanding? We will be looking at novels as bearers of social values, especially around questions of property, class, marriage, work, bureaucracy and the state, and selfhood. Authors studied: Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Thomas Hardy.
    ENGL 0511B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • American Literature in the Era of Segregation

    This course examines how American literature intersects with the legal, ethical, and racial discourses that defined the system of racial segregation. The class will assess literary works in relation to the discourses employed historically to rationalize segregation. In addition the course will explore the ways that literary style and genre became inseparable from the culture of segregation. Authors include Mark Twain, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, and Ralph Ellison. DPLL
    ENGL 0710Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Spring section 01 is reserved for first-year students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Spring section 01 is reserved for first-year students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Spring section 01 is reserved for first-year students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Madani
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students; sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
  • The Thoughtful Generalist

    This *ONLINE* section of “ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research” will prepare you for academic and real-world discourse. In Canvas, you will discuss essays demonstrating deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. You will research and revise four explanatory, analytical, persuasive essays, using varied sources to explore subjects or issues of your choice. Mandatory peer reviews and conferences ONLINE and in person. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030A S01
    This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Learn what it is like to take an online course at Brown and view technical requirements at: http://brown.edu/go/whatisonlinelike
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Writing Science

    This course explores how science, as an academic way of thinking and a method, affects our critical thinking and expression of culture. Readings examine the various dialects of scientific discourse. Students write three major research essays on self-selected scientific topics from both within and outside their fields of study. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030C S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Narrative

    This course offers a broad exploration of the many kinds of essays you can write in creative nonfiction. We will be looking at how authors structure their pieces and the range of narrative techniques they often use. You can expect workshops, in-class prompts and readings by Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris and others. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on “hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050H S01
    1050H, Section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students only.
  • Writing for Today's Electronic Media

    This course introduces students to the practice of reporting for television news, radio, and their online equivalents--online news and podcasts. Exploring the world of communications for contemporary media, the course features hands-on work in writing news, features, and opinion pieces for television, radio, online news, and podcasts. Students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, revising, and workshopping in these media. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Reporting Crime and Justice

    Crime and justice stories are people stories. The drama of everyday life is played out every day in courtrooms. This advanced journalism course will get students into the courtrooms, case files and archives of Rhode Island's judicial system and into committee hearings at the State House where they will report on stories that incorporate drama, tension, and narrative storytelling. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G, ENGL1050H or ENGL1160A (Advanced Feature Writing). Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1160F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Digital Nonfiction

    In this class, we will join the host of other artists, activists, and writers that have used Twitter bots, iPhone apps, virtual reality experiences, and more to tell compelling stories. No previous digital writing experience is necessary, however, as an advanced creative nonfiction class, Digital Nonfiction requires students to have completed ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing with Food

    This course examines writing about food and how writing affects food and food culture. We shall explore the relationship of food to the pen through reading classic texts, writing in and out of class, guest lectures, and touring culinary archives. The goal is to polish personal voice in menus, recipes, memoir, history, reportage, and the lyric essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180C S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Satire and Humor Writing

    For the advanced writer. This course will introduce students to the practice of writing satire and humorous essays. Readings will include works by Jonathan Swift, Mark Twain, Garrison Keillor, Bill Bryson, David Foster Wallace, David Sedaris, and others, and students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, and workshopping in the genre. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • The Art of Literary Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Poetics of Narrative

    Narratives are everywhere, simply there, like life itself, Roland Barthes says; we structure our experiences with narratives that we either infer or create. We will read different literary genres to see how narratives work and what makes them poetic and read theoretical texts to understand narrative function and performance. We will write experimentally to experience how stories are constructed. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0900, 0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • Languages of Conscience: Slave Narratives, Prison Writing, and Abolition

    We’ll read and respond to nonfiction writings that arise from chattel slavery in the U.S and one element of its afterlife, the prison system: their goals, their styles, their strategies. Writings will include analytical and creative responses to these works. The Center for Slavery and Justice will be a resource for us. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Origins of American Literature

    Where does American literature begin? Can it be said to have a single point of origin? Can writings by people who did not consider themselves American be the source of our national literary tradition? Does such a tradition even exist and, if so, what are its main characteristics? How does one understand the various diverse traditions that constitute American literature, including African-American, Native American, and many others, into a single object of study--or does one even need to? Authors may include de Vaca, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, and Phillis Wheatley. WRIT
    ENGL 1310H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • From Mead-Hall to Mordor: The Celtic and Germanic Roots of Tolkien’s Fiction

    This course traces the sources used by J.R.R. Tolkien in writing The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, including tales drawn from Old English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish literatures. You will be introduced to different medieval genres as you consider how the nature and gender of the hero change in specific cultural and linguistic moments.
    ENGL 1311L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Seminar in the Old English Language II

    This course continues the work of Introduction to the Old English Language, which is a prerequisite. We will translate short poems including The Wanderer and The Wife’s Lament and possibly make inroads on Beowulf, while exploring history, cultural context, and changes in Old English studies. Projects include a midterm examination, research presentation, and final paper, as well as daily translations. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Jane Austen and Her Predecessors: The Other History of the Novel

    This course focuses on the novels of Jane Austen — from Sense and Sensibility to Persuasion. The course first establishes some familiarity with the earlier women writers of narrative fiction, in order to gain a deeper understanding of the development of the novel and of Austen's place in that rich tradition. Additional readings include work by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Lennox, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Mary Wollstonecraft.
    ENGL 1510A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Emily Dickinson and the Theory of Lyric Form

    This class examines the extraordinary work of Emily Dickinson in an attempt to understand what lyric poetry is and how it works. We will read a generous sampling of Dickinson’s poetry as well as a number of the major theoretical accounts of the lyric. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.
    ENGL 1511Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture

    The Harlem Renaissance was a remarkable flowering of culture in post-war New York as well as a social movement that advanced political agendas for the nation. This course takes up the relationship between literature and politics by exploring such matters as the urbanization of black America, the representation of the black poor, the influence of white patronage, and the rise of primitivism. Writers may include Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, Fisher, Locke, and McKay. DPLL
    ENGL 1710I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Modern African Literature

    This course considers themes, antecedents, and contexts of modern African literature and related forms. Our readings will include fiction in English or in translation, traditional oral forms like panegyric and festival poetry, and some films. We will examine how these diverse materials explore the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will also address the issue of "tradition" in contexts where nationalisms of various stripes are becoming stronger, even as the world becomes more interconnected through trade, immigration, and digital technology. Authors include Achebe, Cole, Dangarembga, Farah, Gordimer, Ngugi, Salih, Soyinka, Wicomb. Films by Blomkamp, Loreau, Sembène. DPLL
    ENGL 1710J S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Modernism and Everyday Life

    We will examine modernist literature in the context of contemporary art, psychology, and theories of everyday life to ask how this period understood ordinary objects and events. Could they be the proper subject matter of art? In the right circumstances, might they actually be art? Writers may include Woolf, Joyce, Williams, Eliot, Stein, James, Freud, deCerteau. One previous literature class required.
    ENGL 1710L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • American Modernism and its Aftermaths

    An interdisciplinary study of the rise of modernist aesthetic theory in the United States, its dissemination across various aesthetic (poetry, fiction, various plastic arts) and intellectual (economics, sociology, political theory) fields, and its persistence in United States intellectual life in the various permutations of postmodernism that have succeeded it. Authors to be considered include: poets such as Eliot, Williams, Bishop, Brooks, and Ashbery; novelists such as Faulkner, Hurston, O'Connor, and Didion; aesthetic theorists such as Greenberg, Rosenberg, Fried, Baraka and Kraus; and social theorists such as von Neuman, Rawls, Cavell, Kuhn, Samuelsohn, Drucker, and Friedman. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1760U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Recent Novel and its Cultural Rivals

    A careful consideration of several major late twnetith- and early twenty-first century anglophone novels in terms of their relationship to rival aesthetic forms and media--film, television, radio, video games, and the like. Writers to be considered included: Morrison, Lee, Rushdie, Smith, Didion, Díaz, Pynchon, and Egan. Enrollment limited to 20 senior English concentrators. Others admitted by instructor permission only.
    ENGL 1950H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Is There Renaissance Lyric?

    Lyric poetry, like the renaissance, is a repeat offender: I had to do it. By examining inaugural forms—Sappho, Petrarch, Skelton, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson--alongside romantic and post/modernist understandings of lyric, we will display the pleasures of their differences, alternative theories of form, and work by W.R. Johnson, B. Johnson, Culler, R. Greene, Jackson, Prins, Jarvis, Scarry, Stewart. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2361A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Transcendental and Real in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction

    How “realist” was nineteenth-century fiction? This course looks at works where the values are transcendental rather than concrete, and the fate of those values: Dickens, Oliver Twist; Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Eliot, Middlemarch; Pater, Marius the Epicurean; James, The Sacred Fount, “The Real Thing,” and other short fiction; Conrad, Lord Jim and “The Secret Sharer.” These to be read alongside philosophical inquiry about the reality of values (Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Badiou) and novel theory accounts (Lukács, Moretti, Armstrong, Pavel). Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Racial Lives of Affect

    This course explores both dominant and emergent theoretical paradigms that anatomize the affective dimensions of racialized subjectivity in the US with a particular emphasis on recent scholarship that is linked with the field of affect theory. Rather than attempting an exhaustive or definitive mapping of that field, this seminar focuses on those thinkers whose works enhance our understandings of race. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Photographic Memory

    This class examines the relation between photography, memory, narrative, and indexicality. Readings range from classic studies of photography and film to more recent reflections on the role of the camera in a digital age, including the fiction of Ellison, Sebald, and James; the films of Antonioni, Kiarostami, and Bresson; the theoretical work of Bergson, Benjamin, Deleuze, Rancière, Mulvey, and Silverman. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Genres of Critique

    Debate about the nature and effects of reading resonates across the disciplines and beyond. It may be articulated with interests in formal questions of genre and style or philosophical traditions that draw upon Kantian, marxist or post-colonial canons. This course addresses three genres of critique: philosophical, ideological, and literary, addressing each in its engagements with problems of reading. We will interrogate the distinctiveness and incompatibilities of their discourses as well as their intersections and examine the question of genre itself, in literary avatars and as a trope for critique. Readings include Kant, Althusser, Spivak, Eliot, Gaskell. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Comparative Literature
    COLT 0510P Reading the Renaissance
    COLT 1814X Faulkner
    Ethnic Studies
    ETHN 1750H Water is Life/New Currents in the Study of Land, Water, and Indigeneity
    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 0800A The Humanities in Context: Literature, Media, Critique
    HMAN 2400A Politics and Literature
    Modern Culture and Media
    MCM 1503E Aesthetic Theory/Cultural Studies
    Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research
    GNSS 1961J Make a Body Riot: Laughter, Resistance, and African American Literature
    Religious Studies
    RELS 0115 Fiction and the Problems of Faith
    ENGL XLIST 0