Courses for Summer 2021

  • Editing as Revision

    This fully gamified course, organized by historically-based writing guilds and their competitors in bookselling, introduces students to content, copy, and proofs editing as revision praxis. Students will edit publishable texts inside an imaginative game-world, learning editing strategies that help expert authors revise scholarly nonfiction—strategies students will find useful in working with their own writing as well. A writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. Open to juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190Y S01
    This course will be conducted asynchronously. We will not meet together as a class or in sections. We'll use announcements, assignments, forum posts, and elements drawn from online and tabletop games (including but not limited to a story that ties all course elements together, avatars, quests, etc.) to form a class community and get to know one another.
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on “hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050H S01
    Summer 2021 ENGL1050H section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students. This class will be taught in-person unless situations on campus warrant a return to remote learning. In that case, the class will meet via Zoom at the same scheduled time.
    Primary Instructor
    Mooney
  • Writing for Activists

    How can writing support and further change? In this course students will practice grant applications, budget narratives, mission and strategy statements, press releases, position papers, op-eds, and other writing strategies with practical application in activist work. We’ll read examples and theoretical grounding, and guest speakers will introduce us to writings and needs specific to a range of fields. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Reframing Race in Art Writing

    This seminar will consider how contemporary writers and critics respond to art that directly addresses race and challenges institutional power. We will discuss past and recent controversies involving race and representation in exhibitions and examine the relationships between artists, museums and other art institutions, and public audiences. We will consider how writing about arts and culture can advance public discourse about race, equity, and justice. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1050P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Clifton
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Lafferty
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    This class will be conducted asynchronously, three times a week, through CANVAS. Online written discussions of readings and draft uploads will be due Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays by midnight, with responses and peer reviews due the following day. Some additional research and revisions may be required on weekends. Mandatory conferences with the instructor will be held via Zoom, Google Hangout, or FaceTime.
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Summer 2021 ENGL0930 section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Summer 2021 ENGL0930 section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Jane Austen and George Eliot

    A survey of the major novels of Austen and Eliot. Readings will also include contemporary reviews and responses, letters, and Eliot's critical prose, as well as literary theory and criticism addressing questions such as novelistic form, realism and narrativity, the problem of the subject, the politics of aesthetics, and the changing status of the woman writer in the 19th century. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1560A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • The Revolution Will Not be Televised: Poetry and the Politics of Representation

    What are the political effects of representing a person, thing, or event? Is representation itself a useful political goal? With an emphasis on racial politics, this class examines how poetry plays with representability and irrepresentability to call attention to and perhaps change how we see each other and the world. Readings include works by Gertrude Stein, Claudia Rankine, Mercedes Eng, and Layli Long Soldier. Materials may also include popular music by artists like Bob Dylan and Solange. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200T S01
    This course will be conducted synchronously but fully over Zoom. If the situation with COVID improves dramatically, in-person discussions are a possibility but these would still accommodate students who wish to participate remotely.
    Primary Instructor
    Preston
  • Literature and the Problem of Poverty

    This course explores poverty as a political and aesthetic problem for American writers. Examines the ways that writers have imagined the poor as dangerous others, agents of urban decay, bearers of folk culture, and engines of class revolt. Authors include Stephen Crane, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright.
    ENGL 1710K S01
    ONLINE primary lecture W/F and select ONE Monday IN-PERSON conference section. This hybrid class will contain both remote instruction and in-person meetings. Online instruction will take place WF, 10:00-10:50 and in-person conference sections will be held on M, 10:00-10:50. Students taking the class in an exclusively remote format may join sessions via Zoom. If a conference section has more than 19 members enrolled, students will be asked to attend in person on a rotating basis.
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    ENGL 1710K C01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 1710K C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Killing Shakespeare: Three Plays and their Afterlives

    Do adaptations of Shakespeare “kill” his texts? In this course, we will explore three plays—Othello, The Tempest, and Hamlet—with some of their most prominent adaptations. We will focus on how these adaptations consider important political questions of their times in relation to Shakespeare. Authors/directors include: Lawrence Olivier, Aime Cesaire, Jawad Al-Asadi, Vishal Bharadwaj, and Julie Taymor. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Piduri
  • Serial Fictions

    A study of serial and serialized fictional narratives from the nineteenth century the present-- dime novels, serial genre fictions, literary novels comprised of chapters initially published as short stories, radio and film serials, television programs old (The Naked City, Hawaii-Five 0), newer (The Wire, Sex in the City), and new (Americans), podcasts, and video games (Legend of Zelda).
    ENGL 0100U S01
    ONLINE primary lecture M/W and select ONE Friday IN-PERSON conference section. All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the SUMMER term: semester-level 02/04 = 25 each; and 01/03 = 5 each  Yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors).
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    ENGL 0100U C01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100U C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100U C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100U C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Inventing Asian American Literature

    What insights can literature provide into the complicated workings of race in America? What role can the invention of a literary tradition play in illuminating and rectifying past and present injustices? We explore these questions by examining how the idea of an Asian American literary tradition came into being and by reading influential works that have become part of its canon. Students should register for ENGL 0100V S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100V S01
    ONLINE primary lecture M/W and select ONE Friday conference section. All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the SUMMER term: semester-level 02/04 = 25 each; and 01/03 = 5 each  Yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors).
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    ENGL 0100V C01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100V C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100V C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100V C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • The Examined Self: Lives of the Soul

    This course examines a crucial tradition in American letters and culture: the literature of self-examination and the spiritual quest. Each work focuses in some way on questions of identity and identification: We will be reading a wide range of authors and genres-- spiritual autobiography, short fiction, the novel, conversion narratives, confessions, and lyric and epic poetry. Limited to 30 students.
    ENGL 0500P S01
    This hybrid class will contain both in-person and remote instruction. I am expecting that all students on campus will have an opportunity to enjoy some in-person experience of lecture and discussion each week. On campus students should also expect to have some remote learning activities each week. Students taking the class in an exclusively remote format may join classroom sessions via Zoom. If in-person enrollments are more than 19, students will be asked to attend class sessions on a rotating basis.
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • On Being Bored

    This course will explore how and why certain texts and films represent states of non-productivity or non-desire. Beginning with writings from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, we will move into contemporary theoretical and aesthetic reflections on the links between art and worklessness: narratives with neither progress nor plot, characters that resist characterization, as well as poems and films that resist emphatic assertion and revelation. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561W S01
    This course will take place over Zoom.
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Men's Films

    A seminar on recent road films, gross-out comedies, “bromances,” war films, sports films, superhero movies, sex films, and coming-of-age stories particularly concerned with men and masculinity in unusual, often extreme circumstances. Films may include: The Hangover and The Hangover 2, Magic Mike, Moonlight, Bridesmaids, American Sniper, Deadpool, Neighbors, Everybody Wants Some, Foxcatcher, The D-Train, The Change-Up, and Shame. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 0151D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss