Courses for Fall 2018

  • Altered States

    A course about ecstasy, rapture, transport, travel, mysticism, metamorphosis, and magic in pre- and early modern verse, drama, and prose, including: Ovid (Metamorphoses), Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream; Othello), Marlowe (Dr. Faustus), Mandeville's Travels; the writings of the medieval female mystics Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe; the ecstatic verse of Crashaw, and the erotic, at times pornographic, verse of Donne, Herrick, Carew, Rochester, and Behn.
    ENGL 0100C S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each Yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots would be for upper-levels: seniors/juniors since they are first up on the staggered registration system)
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • The Medieval King Arthur

    Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Hawthorne and James

    An introduction to a pair of writers whose work continues to shape our understanding of American literature and American identity. Focusing on much of their most important work, our aim will be to understand how their conceptions of the relationship between writing and history both complicate and complement each other. Limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • The Roaring Twenties

    The 1920s helped solidify much of what we consider modern in 20th-century U.S. culture. This course reads literature of the decade in the context of a broader culture, including film and advertising, to think about the period's important topics: the rise of mass culture and of public relations, changes in women's position, consumerism, nativism and race relations. Writers include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Larsen, Toomer, Parker. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will include Baldwin, Brontë, Coetzee, Conrad, Faulkner, Ishiguro, Morrison, Naipaul, Rushdie, Salih, Shelley. Limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150X S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Hamlet/Post-Hamlet

    Shakespeare’s Hamlet is perhaps the most widely read, performed, adapted, parodied and imitated literary text of the western tradition. In this seminar we will begin by reading/re-reading the play before turning to a number of appropriations of Shakespeare, both in the west and non-west, in order to address social and aesthetic issues including questions of meaning and interpretation, intertextuality and cultural translation. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Thinking in Dark Times: Crisis and the Literary Imagination

    How can writers and artists confront a world on the precipice? What political role does thinking play today? Through reflection on key periods of crisis in the twentieth century, this seminar examines how intellectuals address a threatened world in fiction, nonfiction, criticism, and theory. Texts may include: Arendt, Sontag, Hersey, Baldwin, Hayslip, Pynchon, Kushner, Livingston, Rankine, Coogler, others. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Marsh
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Prose Sagas of the Medieval North

    In this course, we will read long prose fiction from medieval Iceland, Ireland, and Wales, considering how it is similar to and different from the modern novel. We will consider plot, characterization, and style in each linguistic tradition. Texts may include The Cattle Raid of Cooley, The Mabinogi, Njal’s Saga, Egil’s Saga, Grettir’s Saga, and Gisli’s Saga.
    ENGL 0310F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Ishiguro, Amongst Others

    Kazuo Ishiguro is one of the most distinctive and enigmatic voices in contemporary fiction. He has few obvious precursors, and there is little consensus among literary critics about the meanings of his works. This course will try to establish principles for reading Ishiguro's works by seeking alliances for his writing in works of philosophy, literature and cinema. Such interlocutors will include Ozu, Kiarostami, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Hadžihalilovič, Dostoevsky, Pasolini.
    ENGL 0710L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and the Lost Generation

    An introduction to two of the most popular and influential American novelists of the twentieth century, Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. We will read many of their most important novels and stories, including The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises, and A Farewell to Arms. In addition we will examine the work of the contemporary American writers who most influenced them: Gertrude Stein, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and T. S. Eliot.
    ENGL 0710N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Death and Dying in Black Literature

    How is death represented in black literature as a topic and as a figure of genre? Which theoretical ideas help us think about the intertwining of blackness and death? How do notions of gender and sexuality inform this thinking? This course will explore works from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to consider the scope of black literary imaginings of death.
    ENGL 0710V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Simon
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    ENGL 0900 S07
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Pisanelli
    ENGL 0900 S08
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rutkowska
    ENGL 0900 S09
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ben-Meir
    ENGL 0900 S10
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Chowdhury
    ENGL 0900 S11
    Fall sections 01, 02, 03, 04, and 05 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rasch
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Fall sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
  • The Thoughtful Generalist

    This *ONLINE* section of “ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research” will prepare you for academic and real-world discourse. In Canvas, you will discuss essays demonstrating deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. You will research and revise four explanatory, analytical, persuasive essays, using varied sources to explore subjects or issues of your choice. Mandatory peer reviews and conferences ONLINE and in person. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030A S01
    This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Learn what it is like to take an online course at Brown and view technical requirements at: http://brown.edu/go/whatisonlinelike
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Myth + Modern Essay

    A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • The Artist in the Archives

    While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • True Stories

    This class will allow confident writers to explore and develop their creative nonfiction writing. We'll focus on two structures--nonfiction narratives and essays--with occasional forays into other forms. Students will work simultaneously on several small assignments and two larger, self-directed pieces. Readings will include cultural reportage, lyric memoir, science and nature writing, standard and hybrid essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Lifewriting

    We explore writing's various forms—memoir, diary, essay, graphic narrative, film, and autobiography—while crafting personal narrative. Students read sample texts, view films, and keep an electronic diary. Projects include a memoir, personal critical essay, and final autobiography, as well as shorter assignments.This is a writing workshop, so students read & critique each others work. Individual conferences with the instructor also provide feedback. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050D S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 1050G S02
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
  • Multimedia Nonfiction

    Through a series of short assignments, we will learn what audio, visual, and performative tools are available to us and how these different mediums can affect our stories. The course culminates in a final project where each student will pursue a long-form story of their choice of subject and medium. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0930 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    This course prepares students for their work as Writing Fellows. Course readings, activities, and assignments introduce students to: post-process writing theory and pedagogy; data-based investigations of the revision habits of experienced and inexperienced writers; and effective methods for responding to student writing and conferencing with student writers. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kastner
    ENGL 1190M S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Nature Writing

    This course seeks to develop your skills as a sensitive reader and writer of the natural world. You will build a portfolio of revised work through a process of workshops, tutorials, and conferences, and engage in discussion of a range of written and visual narratives with reference to their personal, political, and ecological contexts. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

    Middle English narratives by Geoffrey Chaucer's band of fictional pilgrims, read in their 14th-century historical and literary contexts. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Spenser and Shakespeare

    A comparative study of theme, form, and genre based upon paired works: Shakespeare’s Sonnets/ Amoretti; Faerie Queene I/King Lear; Faerie Queene III/Twelfth Night, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Winter's Tale, Tempest, Venus and Adonis; Shepheardes Calender/As You Like It. Weekly short interpretative exercises (250-500 words) submitted as CANVAS discussions; draft (1250 words) and final essay (3000 words). Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S58
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Lincoln, Whitman, and The Civil War

    A literary and cultural history of the Civil War with special emphasis on Whitman's poetry and Lincoln's addresses and letters. It focuses on issues of race, democracy, and modernity.
    ENGL 1511C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads

    An introduction to and close reading of the Lyrical Ballads, one of the most radical and innovative volumes in British Romantic literature. We will pay special attention to the aesthetic, historical, ethical, and political dimensions of the text, patiently working through the poems and prefaces, as well as reading antecedent texts, in order to understand why the book was an experiment for its authors, and what are its enduring effects on our contemporary moment.
    ENGL 1511F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Gothic Novels and Romantic Poems

    The difference between "high Romantic" poetry and Gothic popular fiction blurs when we look closely at these haunted and haunting texts. This seminar will examine some major Romantic poems by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron in tandem with Gothic novels by Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley.
    ENGL 1511K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
  • Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism: The American Novel and its Traditions

    This course charts the course of American novel from the Civil War to the present. We will attend to the development of a distinctly novelistic literary tradition in American writing over the period and to the interactions between this tradition of literary novel writing and the emergence commercial novelistic generic forms (ie. the detective novel, science fiction). We will also consider the novel’s relations to alternative literary modes (narrative history, the sketch, the short story, the occasional essay) and to alternative media (film, television, music). Melville, Twain, DuBois, James, Fitzgerald, Hammett, Hurston, Wright, Nabokov, Butler, Morrison, Dick, Didion.
    ENGL 1511P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Melville

    A seminar looking closely at the relation between the life and literary work of Herman Melville, with an extended reading of his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. The course will look at the history of writing and publishing during Melville's era and consider some of his contemporaries like Hawthorne and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1560B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Reading New York

    Explores narratives of New York City in a variety of genres, from the early 20th century to the present. Topics to be addressed include immigration, mobility, cosmopolitanism and the neighborhood, downtown, cruising, gentrification, 9/11. Work may include work by John Dos Passos, Nella Larsen, E.B. White, Jane Jacobs, Frank O’Hara, Patti Smith, Nan Goldin, Ernesto Quinones, Jonathan Safran Foer.
    ENGL 1711D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Lyric Concepts: Expression and Experiment in Modern and Contemporary Poetry

    The lyric within contemporary poetry has often been associated with a desire to express a subjective relation to interior experience while experimental traditions have often imagined the poem as a site of formal or conceptual play devoid of specific concerns of identity. This course draws on poets such as Rankine, Moten, Robertson, Hejinian and the critical tools of affect theory to trouble these distinctions.
    ENGL 1711H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Art for an Undivided Earth / Transnational Approaches to Indigenous Art and Activism

    The tension between indigenous literary nationalism and methodologies of cosmopolitanism and transnationalism have animated contemporary Native literary studies. At stake is the very meaning of indigeneity itself—how does indigeneity function on a global scale? How do hemispheric approaches to indigeneity transform our understanding of histories of colonialism? How have artists made connections across space without flattening the specificity of their locations?
    ENGL 1711J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warburton
  • Toni Morrison

    This course will consider Toni Morrison’s novels and essays through four prisms: her interest in the anxieties of Americanness; her attention to language, which includes a consideration of form and of literary theory; her study of love; and her figuring humanity through the experiences of people who are racially black and (often) gendered female. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1760Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S64
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literature and Politics

    Literature as a changing historical formation that often represents and is always shaped by the practices of organizing, asserting, and controlling power in society. Sustained focus on writings by Raymond Williams, Leon Trotsky, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Terry Eagleton, and on literary texts read from the perspectives of these six theorists (possibly Shakespeare, Milton, Marvell, Swift, Dickens, Gaskell, the Brontës, Victor Serge, Anna Akhmatova). Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1900D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Reading Sex

    How do we interpret "sex," as a concept, as a thing, as a phenomenon? What kinds of ethical, political, historical, and aesthetic contexts are informed by--and, in turn, form--our sense of "sex" itself? This course will focus on intensive close readings of various queer theoretical texts, novels, and films that variously try to think through the multiple ways we try to represent and render sex legible, while at the same time calling into question our sense of what, ultimately, sex can be as something that both binds and unbinds the human. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1900K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Tiny Politics: Non-Monumental Ecologies and Poetic Forms of Attention

    This course will examine how poetic forms of attention can offer a different sense of the shifting temporalities of change in the age of the Anthropocene, allowing us to stretch our range of perception to non-monumental rhythms that may be at play below the thresholds of human perception, but also the vast swaths of geologic time that may supersede them.
    ENGL 1901G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required. S/NC
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Proseminar

    This seminar, required for first-year graduate students in English, considers the state and stakes of literary studies today. The course aims to familiarize students with contemporary critical debates and stances in the wider discipline, and to engage with current methodologies, theories, and analytical tensions. We also address issues of professionalization as they relate to the first years of graduate work. Enrollment limited to 10. S/NC.
    ENGL 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Corporate Aesthetics

    An examination of the relationship between American literature and the rise and persistence of the corporation as the principal means of economic, social, and political organization in the United States from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. Authors to be considered include Twain, Wharton, Hopkins, Johnson, Hurston, West, Faulkner, Hughes, and Highsmith. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.
    ENGL 2561S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S64
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Classical and Post-Classical Narratology

    The recent emergence of “post-classical narratology” signals a renewed interest in developing models to explain the functions and structures of narrative. The seminar will examine the most influential classical theories of narrative (from Genette and Barthes to Iser and Ricoeur) through the lens of contemporary debates about cognitive narratology, “unnatural narrative,” queer and feminist narratology, and new media. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.
    ENGL 2901J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Scholarly Writing for Journal Publication

    Writing and professionalization workshop intended for graduate students in literary studies. Topics covered include selection of journal; framing, structuring and composition of the article; the logistics of peer review; sharing and workshopping drafts; working with academic mentors and advisors. Every passing student will have a publishable article under consideration by the end of the semester. Enrollment limited to 12 English Ph.D. students. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Enrollment restricted to students in the English Ph.D. program.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Cogut Institute for Humanities
    HMAN 1973L After Blackness: Framing Contemporary African American Literature
    Judaic Studies
    JUDS 0050A Believers, Agnostics, and Atheists in Contemporary Fiction and Memoirs
    ENGL XLIST 0