Events Archive

Vi Khi Nao: A Bell Curve is a Pregnant Straight Line

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

6:00pm - 7:30pm

Department of English, Nonfiction Writing Program

Pembroke Hall

Rm. 305

 

[email protected] Lecture Series

Vi Khi Nao, acclaimed cross-genre writer, will read from her recent book, A Bell Curve is a Pregnant Straight Line. Major Jackson calls the collection, “Nothing short of a miracle for the future of the body: an avalanche of the imagination that disintegrates the lines separating feelings from thought, the spirit from the natural world, to reveal how language, light and touch thread us into a fuller sense of ourselves.” Hosted by the Nonfiction Writing Program in Pembroke 305 on October 6th at 6 pm.

Anjuli Raza Kolb

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Virtual Event

Epidemic Empire, Pandemic Implications

The rhetoric of contagion has been prominent in the discourse of empire. It dates back to the Indian Mutiny of 1857 and its metaphorical association with cholera epidemics but continues through the American “War on Terror” as waged against terrorism as a “cancer.” This talk will consider how the present COVID-19 global pandemic raises new literary and political extensions of this image.

Feisal Mohamed

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Virtual Event

On Race and Historicism:  A Polemic in Three Turns

A Conversation and Q&A with Dan Barry

Monday, February 8, 2021

6:30pm - 8:00pm

Nonfiction Writing Program, Department of English

Virtual Event

[email protected]

A Conversation and Q&A with Dan Barry

(Moderated by Tracy Breton, a fellow member of the Pulitzer Prize winning team.)

Whose Elegy?: Mourning and the Poetics of Black Imagination

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Zoom

This talk will concern the different modulations of mourning practiced by black cultural producers when the space to mourn is restricted. Using Robert Burns Stepto’s “discourse of distrust,” the talk will engage the double rubric of sight and sound organizing expressions of black suffering.

Kimberly Juanita Brown is an associate professor in the Department of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College.

“Vague Dream-head Lifted Out of the Ground”: Autism and the Sensory

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of English

“Vague Dream-head Lifted Out of the Ground”: Autism and the Sensory

A Reading by DJ and Ralph James Savarese

The concept of neurodiversity has encouraged people not only to accept autism but to embrace it as a valuable form of difference. How might autistic people teach neurotypicals to appreciate the nonhuman? What role might literature play in environmental activism?

All Hallows’ Read

Friday, October 30, 2020

7:30pm - 8:30pm

Nonfiction Writing Program, Department of English

Come to a Nonfiction Writing Program “All Hallows’ Read!”

To celebrate Halloween in this unusual, socially-distanced year, you are invited to a Zoom reading of the scariest nonfiction and fiction texts, featuring the faculty in the Nonfiction Writing Program, on the night before Halloween.

Come to see and support your friends in the English Department, and to celebrate Halloween and our virtual Brown community in style!

Cancelled: Corey McEleney

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of English

70 Brown Street

Barker Room 315

Event Cancelled

The Art of Overanalyzing

Siraj Ahmed

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of English

70 Brown Street

Barker Room 315

Sovereign and Martyr: Necropower, Terrorism, Nonviolence

Gayle Salamon: The Basis of Sex: Trans Identity and the Law

Monday, December 2, 2019

5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of English

70 Brown Street

Barker Room 315

This talk will examine the relation between sexual orientation and gender identity set forth in the prosecution of the Latisha King murder case and the current Supreme Court cases taking up gay and trans employment discrimination.

Grace Lavery: It Really Works: George Eliot, Trans Studies, and the Rhetoric of Technique

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

70 Brown Street

Barker Rm. 315

Between the mid-nineteenth century and the mid-twentieth century, the number of skills that people claimed to be able to teach and learn dramatically increased, as a host of activities previously understood as either innate or spontaneous - stuttering, singing, masturbating, and recovering from alcoholism or other neurotic conditions - were increasingly brought under the remit of acquirable technique.

Amy Pickworth, [email protected] Lecture Series

Friday, November 8, 2019

6:00pm - 7:30pm

Department of English, Nonfiction Writing Program

Smith-Buonanno Hall

Room 106

Bigfoot for Woman

Amy Pickworth’s poems have appeared in Delirious Hem; Dusie; Forklift, Ohio; Love’s Executive Order; New Ohio Review; Smartish Pace; The Journal (Ohio State); Two Serious Ladies; and other publications. Her book Bigfoot for Women (Orange Monkey Book Prize, intro by Matt Hart) was released in 2014.

Francisco Cantú, [email protected] Lecture Series

Friday, October 18, 2019

6:00pm - 7:30pm

Department of English, Nonfiction Writing Program

Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

Martinos Auditorium

The Line Becomes a River:  Dispatches from the US-Mexico Border

David Simon Lecture

Monday, October 7, 2019

5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of English

70 Brown Street

Barker Room 315

Gratuitous Violence

Comic Experience and Lyric Misogyny

Daniel Denvir, [email protected] Lecture Series

Friday, September 20, 2019

6:00pm - 7:30pm

Department of English, Nonfiction Writing Program

Smith-Buonanno Hall

Room 106

All American Nativism:  How the Bipartisan War on Immigrants Explains Politics as We Know It

Daniel Denvir is an award-winning journalist, Visiting Fellow in International and Public Affairs at Brown University’s Watson Institute and the host of “The Dig,” a podcast from Jacobin magazine. He will be presenting All-American Nativism, his book on the history of immigration politics.

Saidiya Hartman: A Poetics of the Document

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Brown/RISD Hillel

Winnick Chapel, 2nd fl.

Saidiya Hartman is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and author of the newly published Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Social Upheaval.

Yogita Goyal: “Runaway Genres: The Global Afterlives of Slavery”

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

5:30pm - 7:30pm

Department of English

Brown/RISD Hillel

Winnick Chapel, 80 Brown St.

This talk tracks the emergence of slavery as the defining template through which current forms of human rights abuses are understood. To fathom forms of freedom and bondage today–from unlawful detention to sex trafficking to the refugee crisis to conscription in war–Professor Goyal shows how contemporary literature draws on the antebellum genre of the slave narrative, reinventing such key genres as sentimentalism, the gothic, satire, ventriloquism, and the bildungsroman.

Gene Jarrett: ‘I am Entirely White!’: The Life and Times of Paul Laurence Dunbar in Late Victorian England

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Office of the Dean of the Faculty

Brown/RISD Hillel, 80 Brown St.

Winnick Chapel, 2nd fl.

This lecture narrates the journey of Paul Laurence Dunbar, the first professional African American writer born after slavery, through parts of England during the first half of 1897. Newly engaged to aspiring writer Alice Ruth Moore, Dunbar reflects on the implications of their brief but already tumultuous courtship, but also on how his life and literature may be forever changed after they marry.

[email protected] - Alumni Writers Forum

Friday, March 8, 2019

4:00pm - 5:30pm

Department of English, Nonfiction Writing Program

Smith-Buonanno Hall

Room 201

Four alums from the Nonfiction Writing Program will offer insights on careers in nonfiction writing, editing, publishing, and teaching. Essayist and n+1 publicity coordinator, Elisabeth Borst ’17.5; Studio Theatre grants coordinator and writer, Sarah Cooke ’17; award-winning writer and producer, Jessica Weisberg ’06; and award-winning writer and teacher, Cutter Wood ’06, will read from their work and talk about writing beyond Brown.

Rita Barnard: “Dictator Games: On Shame, Shitholes, and Beautiful Things”

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Brown/RISD Hillel, 80 Brown St.

Winnick Chapel

Dinaw Mengestu’s The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears provides a springboard to meditate upon contemporary structures of feeling as the frontier effects of migration and gentrification, inclusion and exclusion.  Along colonial and postcolonial sites of shame, the affect is produced in contexts of revolution, violence, and tyranny.  In the USA, the affect is produced through the experience of racial difference, disempowerment, and the denial of the American dream.  A spur for this meditation is Donald Trump’s public drama of narcissism and humiliation — of winner

Cancelled: Eva Hayward: “Spiderwomen”

Thursday, February 21, 2019

6:30pm - 8:00pm

Department of English

Brown/RISD Hillel, 80 Brown St.

Meeting Room, 2nd fl.

Genders are proliferated, pronouns are indeterminate, inclusivity is prioritized, and everywhere in Transgender Studies sex and sexuality are displaced with investments — however fluid — in identification. What problem does sex/uality pose to indeterminacy and fluidity, and to the current field of Transgender Studies?

D. Gilson: “Reading & Remixing: Nonfiction as Interdisciplinary Nexus”

Monday, February 4, 2019

5:30pm - 7:00pm

Department of English

Department of English, 70 Brown St.

Barker Rm. 315

Department of English lecture series

Nonfiction Writing as Thinking and Practice

D. Gilson is Assistant Professor at Texas Tech University. He received his Ph.D. in American literature and cultural studies from the George Washington University in 2016. He works in narrative nonfiction, cultural criticism, and the digital humanities, and his books include I Will Say This Exactly One Time: Essays (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2015); Jesus Freak (Bloomsbury, 2018) and the forthcoming Boyfriends (NYU Press, 2019).