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Deans’ Faculty Fellows Program Opportunities for 2021-2022

The Deans’ Faculty Fellows Program invites applications from Brown PhD students and Brown recent PhD alumni for the opportunities listed below. 

The Deans’ Faculty Fellows program anticipates accepting 20-30 fellows for the coming academic year. Please review the eligibility criteria on the Deans’ Faculty Fellows program page

Application
Applicants may apply to more than one opportunity, submitting a separate application for each. The application is available on UFunds under “Graduate School Distinctive Opportunities.” The application includes a teaching statement, research statement, and statement on the selected Opportunity. Students who are currently in progress to the degree are also asked to include a statement on their plan for completion. Applicants are recommended to limit each statement to no more than 500-750 words. Please review the description carefully as some opportunities may request additional materials. Applications are due December 18. 

Please direct questions about any opportunity to the listed contact(s). General questions about the program can be directed to [email protected].

Opportunities
The following host units are inviting applications (full details for opportunities are included below):

Deans’ Faculty Fellows Opportunities — Descriptions:

Africana Studies

 Africana Studies invites applications for a Deans' Faculty Fellow to serve in a teaching role (1:1), teaching one course in each semester (Fall and Spring) in any combination of West African politics and culture, Afro-Brazilian politics and culture, Caribbean politics and culture or comparative studies of multiple regions in the African Diaspora. The experience of teaching and participating in departmental life will help prepare the DFF for an interdisciplinary career in Africana Studies and similar departments across the US and beyond.

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates should preferably have a PhD in Africana Studies, African Diaspora Studies, African American Studies, West African Studies, or Caribbean Studies. The candidate should have TA and/or RA experience.

Primary Contact: Brian Meeks, Chair, Africana Studies

American Studies

 American Studies invites applications for a Deans' Faculty Fellow to serve in a teaching role (1:1), in their mid-sized interdisciplinary department with a lot of topical flexibility, and with a pronounced interest in deep theorizations of American culture. The fellow selected will teach one class in each semester, will be included in the intellectual life of the department, and should be expected to make some progress on revisions to their dissertation towards publication. The department has a need for one small, seminar style (15-20 students) driven by a focus on a particular topic, which would be chosen by the fellow and may be a new class. It also has a need for a required undergraduate class - also small and seminar style, but driven by a capstone experience - to be taught. This class (and there are several possibilities) would be capped around 15-20 students, as well. Our department is committed to diversity across the entire curriculum. Interested fellows should consider this and model their courses accordingly.

Applicant Background/Experience: Some experience teaching in an interdisciplinary environment is helpful. Experience working with a diverse student body is also extremely helpful.

Primary Contact: Matt Guterl, Chair, American Studies.

Anthropology

 The department of Anthropology invites applications for up to four Deans' Faculty Fellows in the following areas: 

  • A Biological Fellow who can teach (1:1) an introductory course [Past Forward: Discovering Anthropological Archaeology, ANTH0500) or Anthropology of Food, ANTH 0680) and a methods course (The Human Skeleton, ANTH 1720)].
  • A Linguistic Fellow who can teach (1:1) an introductory course (Sounds and Symbols, ANTH0800) and one additional course of their choosing, either from among the department’s current language-focused offerings or of their own design.
  • An Urban Anthropology Fellow who can teach (1:1) an urban anthropology course (e.g. ANTH 1236 Urban Life: Anthropology in and of the City) and an upper-level area course depending on their area of expertise (e.g. ANTH 1111 Anthropology of China).
  • An Engaged Scholar Mentor Fellow who can teach a CBLR-designated undergraduate course, either from among the department’s current engaged offerings or through their own design, and also work with the department’s Director of Undergraduate Community Engagement on several elements of the department’s engaged programming.

Applicant Background/Experience: 

  • The Biological Fellow should hold a PhD in Anthropology with training or previous  experience as a teaching assistant in some of the courses to be offered.
  • The Linguistic Fellow should hold a PhD in Anthropology with research experience, training, or past experience as a teaching assistant in linguistic anthropology.
  • The Urban Anthropology Fellow should hold a PhD in Anthropology with research experience, training, or past experience as a teaching assistant in urban anthropology, and with interest in offering an area studies course.
  • The Engaged Scholar Mentor Fellow should hold a PhD in Anthropology with interest in and experience with engaged research, broadly conceived; whose proposed CBLR-designated course complements departmental offerings; and who has experience mentoring students and developing community partnerships.

Primary Contact: Jessaca Leinaweaver, Chair, Anthropology.

Applied Mathematics

Applied Mathematics invites applications for a Deans' Faculty Fellow to teach or co-teach (1:1) two applied mathematics courses. Among the introductory courses we offer are applied ordinary and partial differential equations, introduction to scientific computing, methods of applied mathematics, and statistical inference (the specific courses we plan to cover are APMA 0160, 0330, 0340, 0350, 0360, or 1650). Depending on the background of the Faculty Fellow, it may also be possible to co-teach advanced undergraduate courses. For courses with larger enrollments, we provide support by teaching assistants, and we will also offer mentoring support from experienced faculty.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants with a degree in the mathematical sciences (applied mathematics, biostatistics, and mathematics) are preferred. We also expect demonstrated teaching experience as teaching assistant or sole instructor.

Primary Contact: Bjorn Sandstede, Chair, Applied Mathematics.

Brown Arts Initiative

The Brown Arts Initiative (BAI) invites applications for up to three Deans' Faculty Fellows for teaching and administrative roles: 

  • The Film Fellow will teach one undergraduate-level film-based course during Fall 2021. The course may be based in theory, practice or critique, to be determined by the candidate in conjunction with the department. Additionally, the Fellow will work closely with Brown Arts Initiative to oversee and mentor three undergraduate student film projects from script through production. Responsibilities will include meeting regularly with student filmmakers, liaising with Brown Arts Initiative and the Student Activities Office safety officer, and ensuring film projects adhere to University policies.
  • The ARTS Fellow will lead the Fall 2021 Arts Workshop (ARTS1000) with a theme jointly determined by the Fellow and Brown Arts Initiative. The selected theme will be built upon in Spring 2022 during a mini-fest programmed by the ARTS Fellow with the intention of bringing together projects developed in the Workshop with new works by visiting artists.
  • The Writing Fellow will be responsible for developing and implementing one upper-level undergraduate course focused on art writing and criticism during Fall 2021. The course will feature four visiting artists to be selected by the Fellow in conversation with BAI who will lead workshops with students about the history and practice of art criticism. During Spring 2022, the Arts Writing Fellow will work with students interested in building their writing portfolio by focusing writing projects on BAI programs. The Fellow will compile works into a publication highlighting arts writers on campus and archiving BAI programs. Additionally, the Fellow will be tasked with creating the infrastructure for the writing workshops and publication to continue on an annual basis.

Applicant Background/Experience: 

  • The Film Fellow should have experience with basic film production, interest in mentoring and the ability to develop a rigorous course syllabus aligned with departmental needs. Programming and event planning experience preferred. 
  • The ARTS Fellow should have significant experience with interdisciplinary practice/theory and be well versed in leading cross-disciplinary discussions. Applicants should be strong facilitators with an interest in developing group dynamics and building peer mentorships. Prior experience with event curation and programming preferred.
  • The Writing Fellow should have significant experience with arts writing and teaching, as well as leading group discussions about interdisciplinary arts-based programs. Additionally, applicants should have familiarity with building new programs and project management.

Primary Contact: Chira DelSesto, Director for Programs and Operations, Brown Arts Initiative.

Center for Language Studies

The Center for Language Studies (CLS) invites applications for up to two Deans' Faculty Fellow with a PhD in modern languages. 

  • The Study Abroad Fellow will be responsible for several initiatives relating to undergraduate language education. They will teach a first-year seminar on a comparative topic in English. The candidate should design a course that meets 3 times a week, is eligible for the WRIT designation, is discussion-based, and integrates technology in a meaningful way. Additionally, the Fellow will have the opportunity to work in an administrative role in which they will research trends relating to study abroad, internships, and language certifications at the university-level in the United States. The Fellow will work closely with the CLS Director to explore pathways for undergraduates to fully maximize their expertise and degrees in modern languages.
  • The Undergraduate Teacher Trainer Fellow, in addition to teaching a first-year seminar on a comparative topic, will have the opportunity to work in an administrative role to expand programming at the Center, including conferences, lectures and other events on topics relevant to a cross-section of interests within the modern languages. The Fellow will also work to create an organized training program for undergraduate language tutors who host Language Open Hours and Language Tables. The Fellow will need to liaise with other departments and centers for information regarding best practices and procedures for training UGTAs and student workers. The Fellow will serve as the faculty advisor to the undergraduate language ambassadors and student tutors.

Please note: applicants are asked to submit a two-page course proposal for a first-year seminar on a comparative topic in English. Please upload this in the Additional Materials section of the application.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants must hold a recent PhD in a modern language. The candidate is expected to have a strong and demonstrated interest in teaching at the undergraduate level. Applicants must have highly effective people skills, experience teaching undergraduates, be self-directed, motivated, familiar with technology, and have a willingness to reach out to other departments.

Primary Contact: Jane Sokolosky, Director of Language Studies.

Classics

The Classics department invites applications for up to two Deans’ Faculty Fellows to teach (1:1):

  • The DIAP/South East Asia Fellow will teach two new courses, one addressing DIAP-related issues in ancient Greek and Roman cultures (e.g. race and ethnicity, refugees and exiles), the other a comparative cultural course that will explore an aspect of the reception of antiquity, or classical traditions, by exploring another culture (e.g. South East Asian). This course will also serve as an elective in the relevant department (e.g. East Asian Studies).This position envisages the suitably qualified candidate to draw comparisons with South East Asia, but other cultural comparisons in other global cultures are equally possible.
  • The DIAP/Late Antiquity Fellow will teach two courses, one addressing DIAP-related issues in ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Ideally, this course will explore aspect(s) of Late Antique history or culture or literature. The other course will be the regular introductory course to Late Antique culture, CLAS0660, The World of Byzantium. 

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • The ideal candidate for the DIAP/South East Asia Fellow position will have a PhD in Classics, or Ancient History, or a related field. Previous experience of teaching is required. Candidates should submit a course proposal, and a syllabus, for each of the two courses to be offered. Candidates should be able to convey appropriate methodological approaches that will satisfy the Brown DIAP requirement for at least one of the two courses.
  • The ideal candidate for the DIAP/Late Antiquity Fellow position will have a PhD in Classics, or Ancient History, or a related field, and be familiar with the relevant aspects of Late Antiquity on which the teaching for this position focuses. Previous experience of teaching is required. Candidates should submit a course proposal, and a syllabus, for each of the two courses to be offered. Candidates should be able to convey appropriate methodological approaches that will satisfy the Brown DIAP requirement for at least one of the two courses.

Primary Contact(s): Beverly Bossler (DIAP/South East Asia position), Professor of History; Graham Oliver (both positions), Chair, Classics.

Cogut Institute for the Humanities

The Cogut Institute invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow in teaching and administration. The Fellow will will teach one course (the gateway “Humanities in Context” course) and provide administrative support for communications and outreach, which might include writing assignments for the Institute newsletter, social messaging for events and specific programs, podcast transcripts and video captioning, and defined support tasks for the 21st-Century PhD project and the Collaborative Humanities. The Faculty Fellow will report to the Director and work closely with the Associate Director. 

Applicant Background/Experience: The applicant should have disciplinary expertise in the humanities or the humanistic social sciences; interest in interdisciplinary approaches is preferred. Strong organizational and communication/editing skills required.  Software skills preferred: basic knowledge of html and web page design; familiarity with image editing and design (Adobe Photoshop and InDesign, for example); some experience with social media platforms (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube); video editing (iMovie or Adobe Premiere) a plus.

Contact(s): Damien Mahiet, Associate Director; Amanda Anderson, Director, Cogut Institute.

Computer Science

The department of Computer Science invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow to teach or co-teach one of the large CS courses in the areas of probability and data analysis, algorithms, or machine learning. This position could be either a teaching (1:1) position, or a teaching and research position. In the latter case, the Deans’ Faculty Fellow candidate will teach or co-teach one course and conduct research, working in the general area of statistical machine learning theory, developing rigorous analytical performance guarantees for the performance machine learning algorithms. In particular the Fellow will focus on small sample settings, and will extend classical guarantees in IID learning settings to dependent time series settings (with minimal assumptions) and to fair machine learning over multiple groups with divergent preferences. Applicants should indicate their preference for either the teaching (1:1) position or the teaching and research position.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants, in addition to holding a PhD in Computer Science, should have a record of effective instruction or graduate teaching assistant experience in a relevant CS course. Further, to successfully carry out the above mentioned research, candidates will need to have deep knowledge and understanding of probability theory, algorithm theory and  classical statistical learning theory. 

Contact(s): Ugur Cetintemel, Chair; Lauren Clarke, Academic and IP Programs, Computer Science

Education

The department of Education invites applications for up to two Deans’ Faculty Fellows to teach (1:1).

  • An Education Studies Fellow who can teach two elective courses in the Education Studies undergraduate concentration of the Fellow's design, one lecture course and one seminar course, to expand and diversify our course offerings. These courses can be about schooling, education broadly defined, or human development in context (including families, communities, and culture). We are especially interested in adding DIAP and/or CBLR designated courses to our curriculum. 
  • A Quantitative Methods Fellow who can teach two courses at the undergraduate or Master’s level in the areas of quantitative policy analysis as applied to education and/or economics of education. 

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • For the Education Studies position, we are open to candidates from any social science or humanities discipline whose work engages education, broadly conceived.  Applicants must have comfort working in interdisciplinary contexts and with diverse students and colleagues.  Some teaching experience is strongly preferred.  
  • For the Quantitative Methods Fellow position, the applicant must have the methodological training to teach quantitative policy analysis including statistics at the introductory level for undergraduate or MA students and be able to apply it in education.  A background in economics is strongly preferred, as is teaching experience.  Applicants must be comfortable working in interdisciplinary environments and with diverse students and colleagues.

Primary Contact(s): Tracy Steffes, Associate Professor and Chair; Heather Johnson, Academic Department Manager, Education.

Egyptology and Assyriology

The Department of Egyptology and Assyriology invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow appointment in the area of Assyriology, the study of ancient Iraq and its environs, c. 3000 BCE - 100 CE. The Fellow will teach one course each semester in the following areas: Akkadian language and literature (Fall); ancient Near Eastern history (Spring). They will also be expected to be actively engaged in the academic life of the department, participating in lecture series, colloquia, and seminars.

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates should have a PhD in Assyriology or cognate discipline (Religious Studies; Archaeology; Ancient History); at least two semesters of teaching experience as TA or TF; demonstrated knowledge of Akkadian language/literature and ancient Near Eastern history.

Contact(s): Matthew Rutz, Chair; A. Catherine Hanni, Academic Department Manager, Egyptology and Assyriology.

English

The English department invites applications for up to four Deans' Faculty Fellows:

  • A Modernism Fellow who can teach (1:1) a specialized upper-level undergraduate seminar and a somewhat larger, more comprehensive “lecture” course in modernism, genre studies, cultural criticism, or literary theory. Potential teaching areas to be covered: modernism, modern and contemporary culture; literary and cultural theory; race and ethnicity; cross-cultural approaches to literature and culture; film and other media. 
  • A Literary Studies Fellow who works in any pre-20th/21st-century field of literary studies (including medieval, early modern, 18th century British and American, and 19th century British and American), and who can contribute courses to our undergraduate curriculum in which a consideration of race will hold a significant role. For this second Fellow, their teaching (1:1) would entail both a specialized upper-level undergraduate seminar and a somewhat larger course to be determined according to the fellow's expertise and interests.
  • A Gender Studies Fellow whose work focuses on gender and gendering, feminisms, and trans scholarship, and who could offer one undergraduate course in this area, thus enhancing and expanding the range of our curriculum, which prioritizes gender and sexuality. The successful candidate will teach one course in the Fall, and will serve during that time on the English Department’s DIAP Committee. During the second semester, the Faculty Fellow would work in an administrative role, developing and implementing programs to support and expand the aims of our DIAP.
  • An Interdisciplinary Fellow. Although we are especially interested in the Fellow having expertise in periods before the twentieth century, we are open to any period; the primary emphasis is on interdisciplinarity. Our ideal candidate focuses on questions of literature and social engagement, and will teach one undergraduate course in the Fall or Spring semester that brings literary studies into contact with other fields, inviting students to examine social questions and formations. In the non-teaching semester, the Faculty Fellow will work closely with the DGS to develop and execute programming related to career diversity.

Applicant Background/Experience: 

  • The Modernism Fellow should have a record of scholarly work—e.g., a completed dissertation, publications, conference papers—in the field along with undergraduate teaching experience, preferably including courses specifically on modernist literature and culture. An ability to teach introductory literary concept courses also strongly desired. 
  • The Literary Studies Fellow should have a record of scholarly work—e.g., a completed dissertation, publications, conference papers—in the field and should be able to produce course proposals—in the desired area(s) with the desired focus.
  • The Gender Studies Fellow should have a record of scholarly work—e.g., completed dissertation, publications, conference papers, course proposals—in the desired area(s) with the desired focus, as well as some background working on issues of diversity and inclusion.
  • The Interdisciplinary Fellow should have a record of scholarly work—e.g., completed dissertation, publications, conference papers, course proposals—in the desired area(s) with the desired focus, as well as an openness and commitment to thinking about careers beyond the professoriate.

Primary Contact(s): Richard Rambuss, Chair; Ravit Reichman, Director of Graduate Studies, English.

French Studies

The French Studies department invites applications for a Deans' Faculty Fellow for a teaching position (1:1). This position will involve teaching one language course and one advanced undergraduate course in Francophone literature and culture. The VAP would have the opportunity to create their own course(s) on Francophone literature/culture, using the FREN 1710 rubric. As Francophone studies give central focus to questions of France's colonial history, post-coloniality, racial interactions in France and the Francophone world, among other things, these courses will be important in contributing to broadening and diversifying the curriculum, offering a valuable global perspective on questions of diversity and inclusion. This position would provide a valuable opportunity for a newly minted PhD to develop and teach courses of their own making and, thus, put themselves on a stronger footing for the job market.

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates must have a research specialization in Francophone literature and culture as well as demonstrated excellence in language teaching.

Primary Contact: Lewis Seiffert, Chair, French Studies.

Hispanic Studies

Hispanic Studies invites applications for up to four Deans’ Faculty Fellows who can provide instruction (1:1) for beginning, intermediate, or advanced Spanish one semester and our concentration gateway course, Advanced Spanish through Literature and Film, for one semester.

Applicant Background/Experience: All applicants must have native or near-native fluency in Spanish, as well demonstrated excellence in language teaching.

Primary Contact(s): Laura Bass, Chair; and Mary Oliver, Academic Department Manager, Hispanic Studies.

History

The History department invites applications for up to four Deans’ Faculty Fellows positions:

  • An East Asian History Fellow who can develop and teach (1:1) one lecture course (Fall 2021) as instructor of record and develop and co-teach one seminar with a faculty mentor (Spring 2022.) Subject areas of courses to be decided in consultation with East Asia field faculty (including proposed faculty mentor) and History Chair, DUS, and DGS, but should complement existing course offerings. Preference for courses that engage some aspect of East Asian regional history or its global context.
  • A High Medieval European Fellow who can teach (1:1) two undergraduate courses in high medieval European history (ca. 1000-ca.1500), one in each semester of AY 2021-2022.
  • A Modern History Fellow who can teach two modern history courses. One semester the successful applicant will co-teach with Professor Omer Bartov “Modern Genocide and Other Crimes Against Humanity,” an under-1000 level lecture course. In addition to co-teaching the class, the candidate would work with the co-instructor to redesign the syllabus. The other semester the successful applicant would teach a lecture course on Modern European history of their choosing.
  • A “US & the World” Fellow who can offer courses that will embed early American history in its broader geopolitical and diplomatic context. In addition to offering one course each semester, the appointee may also advise senior thesis students and participate in the scholarly activities of the History Department and the broader university community.

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • The East Asian History Fellow must have a PhD in History or a discipline with substantial training in historical methods and pedagogy. Applicants who can engage with departmental and university DIAP goals via their teaching and their involvement with the field of East Asian history are strongly preferred.
  • The High Medieval European Fellow should have a PhD in History with a focus on western Europe in the high middle ages. Substantial teaching experience (whether as a Teaching Assistant or as the instructor of record) is also required. Ideally, the applicant would also have thought in their teaching and/or research about how the medieval past is being mobilized today by white supremacists in support of anti-Black racism. 
  • The Modern History Fellow should hold a PhD in History and have experience teaching the history of modern Europe and/or experience teaching the history of genocide. The applicant should have a track record of effectiveness as an instructor and experience delivering undergraduate lectures. A research interest in modern Europe and/or genocide is preferred.
  • The “US & the World” should hold a PhD in History, possess a successful publication record, have experience conducting research in non-US, non-Anglophone archives, and a commitment to globalizing the history of the United States.

Primary Contact(s): Linford Fisher, Director of Graduate Studies; Ethan Pollock, Chair; Rebecca Nedostup (East Asian History Fellow), Associate Professor; Amy Remensnyder (High Medieval European Fellow), Professor; Omer Bartov (Modern History Fellow), Professor; Seth Rockman (“US & the World” Fellow), Associate Professor, History.

History of Art and Architecture

The History of Art and Architecture department applications for  up to two Deans’ Faculty Fellows: 

  • A Teaching Fellow who can provide instruction (1:1) in the areas of late medieval-early modern art and architecture. The Fellow will offer a lecture course during the Fall and a seminar in the spring. 
  • An Teaching and Administration Fellow who can teach one course during the Spring 2022 semester in any area of the history of art and architecture. The Fellow will supervise the departmental undergraduate thesis writers’ seminar, which meets weekly throughout the year, and would work with the chair and the department DIAP committee to aid in the supervision of undergraduate DIAP activities. 

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • The Teaching Fellow should have a strong background in Medieval and/or Early Modern History of Art and Architecture, and would normally hold a degree in HIAA. We are interested in individuals whose work focuses on any aspect of the Medieval or early Modern world, and who hold significant relevant research experience. We are particularly interested in individuals with teaching experience.
  • The Teaching and Administration Fellow should have a background in History of Art and Architecture, and would normally hold a degree in HIAA. We are interested in individuals who have an interest and experience in undergraduate mentoring and teaching, and who demonstrate interest in building diversity in academia.

Primary Contact(s): Sheila Bonde, Director of Graduate Studies; Evelyn Lincoln, Department Chair; and Diana Adamczyk, Academic Office Manager, History of Art and Architecture. 

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

The Joukowsky Institute invites applications for up to four Deans' Faculty Fellows: 

  • A Roman Archaeology Fellow whose research and teaching focuses on Roman material culture of any period. Successful candidates will be expected to teach (1:1) one course per semester at the 100- or 1000-level: One semester this will be a course in Roman archaeology co-taught with an Assistant Professor in the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World; the other semester, the Fellow will be encouraged to develop a course based on their own research interests, that would complement the offerings of Joukowsky Institute faculty.
  • An Archaeological Science Fellow who can teach (1:1) a course (at the 100- or 1000-level) in a topic that helps undergraduate students develop practical skills and knowledge of archaeological science, preferably including practical, lab-based sessions, and develop a course based on their own research interests that would complement the offerings of Joukowsky Institute faculty. Ideally, both courses will appeal to both archaeology concentrators and to concentrators in Engineering, Anthropology, and the sciences. 
  • A Diversity and Inclusion Fellow who can teach (1:1) courses on diversity and inclusion in archaeology, material culture, and related topics. Courses may address such issues as archaeological ethics, diversity/inclusion, outreach/engagement, and social justice—or other topics relevant to the study of archaeology or closely related disciplines including but not limited to art history, anthropology, or religious studies.
  • An Archaeology and the Ancient World Fellow who can teach (1:1) courses 100- or 1000-level supporting Archaeology and the Ancient World concentrators in fulfilling the courses required to complete the concentration. Courses could be on a wide range of topics related to archaeology, and would not be restricted to any particular approach, region, or time period. Requirements for the concentration are intentionally broad and interdisciplinary, so proposed teaching could be similarly wide-ranging.

Applicant Background/Experience: 

  • The Roman Archaeology Fellow should have a strong background in the archaeology and history of the Roman world, and would normally hold a degree in Archaeology, Classics, or Art History.  We are interested in individuals whose work focuses on any aspect of the Roman world, and who hold significant relevant research experience, preferably including archaeological fieldwork in the Roman world. We are particularly interested in individuals with teaching experience, ideally as sole instructor, and with experience leading collaborative projects or with team teaching.
  • The Archaeological Science Fellow should have a background in both Archaeology and another relevant discipline, preferably in the sciences. We are interested in individuals whose work is situated at the intersection between Archaeology and one of the sciences. While we prefer familiarity with the Mediterranean and/or Near East, there are no limits on regional or chronological expertise. Ideally, applicants will have experience in guiding students through hands-on experiments, fieldwork, or lab work.
  • The Diversity and Inclusion Fellow should have a background in Archaeology or any relevant discipline. While we prefer familiarity with the Mediterranean and/or Near East, there are no limits on regional or chronological expertise. Demonstrated familiarity with issues around ethics, social justice, diversity, and inclusion is essential.
  • The Archaeology and the Ancient World Fellow should have a background in Archaeology or any relevant discipline. While we prefer familiarity with the Mediterranean and/or Near East, there are no limits on regional or chronological expertise.

Primary Contact(s): Sarah Sharpe, Assistant Director; Laurel Bestock, Director of Graduate Studies; and Peter van Dommelen, Director, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.

Mathematics

The Division of Mathematics invites applications for up to two Deans’ Faculty Fellows for teaching (1:1) positions. In the Fall semester, each Fellow will teach and coordinate a multi-section calculus course (including working with graduate teaching assistants), and in the spring, teach a higher level course. The calculus courses include high-enrollment introductory calculus multi-section courses (one of MA 90, 100, 180, or 190, 200) or Linear Algebra (MA 520).

Applicant Background/Experience: The department prefers Fellows holding a PhD in Mathematics who have experience teaching undergraduate calculus.

Primary Contact(s): Jeffrey Hoffstein, Chair; and Doreen Pappas, Academic Department Manager, Mathematics.

Modern Culture and Media

The department of Modern Culture and Media (MCM) invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow to teach a (1:1) course in the Fall and one course in the spring of AY 2021-22 in areas within film and media studies.  

Applicant Background/Experience: We are eager to identify a recent PhD graduate whose research and teaching engages critical and cultural theory as a basis for studying media formations, including innovative reinterpretations of cinema and/or reconsiderations of related modern media. We welcome applications from scholars whose work is in conversation with the modes of critical analysis (such as from critical gender/sexuality studies, critical race studies, decolonial/anti-imperialist studies, (sub)cultural studies, ideological analysis, textual studies, psychoanalysis) that lie at the heart of the MCM’s unique mission to think between and across multiple media forms as well as between cultural theory and media theory & practice. We are open to multiple possible interests but have particularly strong curricular needs in critically informed and theoretically engaged cinema studies, digital media studies, and film/video/digital convergent media studies, and would particularly welcome those who would teach courses at the introductory or intermediate levels.

Primary Contact(s): Liza Hebert, Department Manager; Lynne Joyrich, Director of Graduate Studies; Kevin McLaughlin, Chair; Hannah Zoll, Program Coordinator, Modern Culture and Media

Pembroke Center, Gender and Sexuality Studies

The Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow to teach (1:1) two courses, one freshman seminar and one sophomore seminar, during the academic year 2021-22. These classes would have a gender and sexuality focus, but would be tailored to and reflect the Fellow’s area of expertise. Optimally, the courses will complement the one general undergraduate course that we offer annually, Introduction to Gender and Sexuality (GNSS 0120).

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates must be theoretically grounded and versed in gender and sexuality studies. Areas of expertise may include but are not limited to: women’s studies, queer theory, trans theory, gender and sexuality studies more generally. Candidates must be knowledgeable in their principal areas of research (i.e., English, sociology, anthropology, comparative literature, modern culture and media, etc.) and work through an intersectional approach that privileges questions of gender and sexuality. Preference will be given to candidates who demonstrate a pronounced focus on gender and sexuality, particularly students who have completed a certificate in GNSS, although this is not required.  

Primary Contact(s): Jeremy Lehnen, Interim Associate Director; Donna Goodnow, Center Manager; and Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg, Pembroke Center.

Philosophy

The department of Philosophy is seeking applications for up to three Deans’ Faculty Fellows teaching positions:

  • The Feminist/Death and Dying Fellow will teach (1:1) two courses. A first course is Feminist Philosophy, which would investigate the contributions to feminist theory that have been made by philosophers, beginning with de Beauvoir and running up through such contemporary figures as Nussbaum and Haslanger. Topics would include: the nature of gender, oppression, masculinity and femininity, and more. Emphasis would be placed on understanding these issues in relation to social categories such as race, sexuality and (dis)ability.). The second course is Death and Dying, a study of the philosophical literature on such topics as the possibility of an afterlife, whether immortality is desirable, suicide, whether death is worse than prenatal nonexistence, whether we can be harmed by events after our deaths, and more.
  • The Pain and Suffering/Philosophy of Emotions Fellow will teach (1:1) two courses. A first course is Pain and Suffering, is an introduction to the philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology relevant to answering questions about these topics, as well as to how they are addressed in Buddhism. Topics would include perceptual and introspective models of awareness of pain, whether pains are located in the body or the mind, the implications of pain asymbolia (a condition in which even extreme pain is not perceived as bothersome), the pain matrix in the brain, and more. The second course, Philosophy of Emotions, will cover topics including differences and similarities among emotions, the relationships between moods and emotions, interactions between emotions and cognition, and more. 
  • The Data Science Ethics Fellow will teach (0:1) a new course, The Ethics of Data Science, in the Spring of 2022. Topics in this area include the ethics of electronic privacy, embedding moral codes in AI software (with a view to regulating robot behavior), Facebook and the ethics of censorship, and moral constraints on programmers (principles to guide programmers in deciding when it is ethically permissible to design programs with important social consequences).

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • The Feminist/Death and Dying candidate should have a PhD in Philosophy and a background in the relevant teaching areas.
  • The Pain and Suffering/Philosophy of Emotions candidate should have a PhD in Philosophy and a background in the relevant teaching areas.
  • The Data Science Ethics candidate will need to have a PhD in Philosophy, as well as some background in Computer Science (e.g., taken college coursework in Computer Science).

Primary Contact(s): Christopher Hill, Director of Graduate Studies; Bernard Reginster, Department Chair, Philosophy.

Political Science

The department of Political Science invites applications for up to six Deans' Faculty Fellows for teaching positions (1:1) in various Political Science subfields. 

  • American Politics (American race and ethnic politics, political institutions or contemporary and democratic theory).
  • International Relations (introduction to international relations, climate change, technology and world politics, methods of warfare, international security, contemporary social issues, international relations theory or human rights).
  • Comparative Politics (introduction to comparative politics, ethnic identity and conflict, political authority or social policy).

Candidates will be expected to teach one undergraduate course each semester in their chosen areas. Please see here for more details about courses.

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates must have an earned doctorate in Political Science between June 1, 2020 and August 31, 2021 and demonstrated potential for excellence in teaching through prior experience either in a TA position or as a primary instructor. The successful applicant will be able to create course syllabi based on interest areas that meet the needs of the department. Preference will be given to any candidate who can also teach a broad introductory course on mixed methods research (POLS0500). 

Primary Contact: Wendy Schiller, Chair; Melvin Rogers, Director of Graduate Studies, Political Science. 

Portuegese and Brazilian Studies

Portuegese and Brazilian Studies invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow to teach (1:1) two courses at the advanced undergraduate level covering the literatures and cultures of Portugal, Lusophone Africa, and Brazil. Candidates will preferably teach POBS630 and a concentration seminar. Either course allows the candidate to focus the specific materials taught around his/her research interests. 

Applicant Background/Experience: Candidates are expected to have expertise in at least two of the aforementioned geographic areas (preference will be given to those who demonstrate expertise in all three areas); they should be able to teach courses on a variety of literary and or cultural themes such as environmental humanities, postcolonial and decolonial literature and cultural expression, intersectional analysis of cultural and literary expression, etc. Candidates must be fluent in Portuguese and English and must have experience teaching courses on the Lusophone world at the advanced undergraduate level (POBS400, POBS610 and/or POBS620). 

Primary Contact(s): Leila Lehnen, Chair; Leonor Simas-Almeida, Director of Graduate Studies; Armanda Silva, Academic Department Manager, Portuguese and Brazilian Studies.

Religious Studies

The department of Religious Studies invites applications for up to three Deans’ Faculty Fellows teaching (1:1) positions:

  • The Islamic Studies Fellow will teach two courses in Islamic Studies, one introductory survey course and a second intermediate level course on a theme of their choosing, but which is also meant to appeal to broad undergraduate interests at Brown. 
  • The Mediterranean World Fellow will teach one course each semester relevant to religion in ancient cultures of the Mediterranean world. One course should be at the introductory level on some aspect of biblical literature, possibly with other ancient Mediterranean religious texts. A second course should be on a topic, theme or problem that would be of interest to Religious Studies students.
  • The Religion and Critical Thought Fellow will contribute two undergraduate courses to the curriculum in the broad area of religion and critical thought (philosophy of religion, religious ethics, and theory of religion). Courses should supplement or complement existing course offerings and could include areas such as environmental humanities, feminist ethics, history of religious thought, or gender and religion. One course should be introductory and of broad appeal, the other can be introductory, intermediate, or advanced, and can pertain to the candidate’s specialization (but still of significantly broad interest to undergraduate students). Proposals should include a brief outline of the two courses being proposed.

Applicant Background/Experience:

  • The Islamic Studies Fellow will have experience in theory of religion and in teaching undergraduate courses in Islamic Studies (in the pre-modern or modern period, and with an ability to engage theoretical issues in the study of religion broadly and Islam specifically). To coordinate with existing faculty, preference may be given for those who specialize in Central or South Asia. The Fellow may also be called upon to supervise undergraduate theses or capstone projects.
  • The Mediterranean World Fellow’s teaching should complement the department’s strength in the study of people, texts, ideas, and practices, with expertise within and across ancient Mediterranean societies; the Fellow will also share our commitment to pedagogy that prioritizes diverse and inclusive perspectives. A successful candidate must be engaged in innovative and independent research and should have formal training in religious studies, preferably with work in method and theory (e.g., RELS 2000 or equivalent).
  • The Religion and Critical Thought Fellow should have formal training in religious studies, with a specialization in philosophy of religion, religious ethics, history of religious thought, theory of religion, religion and ecology, or related fields. 

Primary Contact: Stephen Bush, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Religious Studies.

Science and Technology Studies

The Program in Science and Technology Studies invites applications for a Deans' Faculty Fellow to serve in a teaching role (1:1). This position will entail teaching two courses: 1) the Fall STS senior seminar, required for all STS concentrators (typically there are 12-15 concentrators each year); and 2) a Spring seminar of the DFF’s design, with preference for a DIAP-related seminar that analyzes the relationship of science, medicine, and technology with issues of structural inequality, racial formations, systems of power, or the production of knowledge about categories of ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, and/or ability. This opportunity will enable a recent PhD to gain interdisciplinary teaching experience and to develop and teach a course of their own design.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants should have some background in science studies and/or history of science and medicine, as demonstrated by course work, related teaching experience, dissertation topic, or participation in the STS graduate workshop or certificate program. Applicants can come from any field in the humanities or social sciences. 

Primary Contact: Deborah Weinstein, Director of Science, Technology, and Society.

Sociology

The Sociology department invites applications for up to four Deans’ Faculty Fellows to teach (1:1) in both Fall and Spring. Teaching opportunities are in a variety of areas. Applicants should identify their choice(s) of Fall and Spring courses from the following list.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants should have a PhD in Sociology or a related field, a strong commitment to teaching and an interest in the topic.

Primary Contact(s): Janet Blume, Chair; David Lindstrom, Director of Graduate Students; Betsy Valle, Student Affairs Coordinator, Sociology.

Theatre and Performance Studies (TAPS)

Theatre and Performance Studies invites applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellow to teach (1:1) undergraduate courses in performance studies that will support the undergraduate curriculum. In one semester, the student will teach a course based in their own expertise (courses intersecting with gender studies and critical race studies highly encouraged ) and one core course in the department's core undergrad sequence: TAPS 1240, TAPS 1250, Issues in Performance Studies, or Introduction to TAPS.

Applicant Background/Experience: Applicants should have familiarity with Performance studies, experience as an independent section leader or teacher of an independent class, ability to teach in a hybrid, online and in person model preferable. Experience with writing intensive courses is a plus. Knowledge of one of the following a plus: critical race studies, gender/sexuality studies.

Contact: Patricia Ybarra, Chair, TAPS.

Urban Studies 

As an interdisciplinary humanities and social science program, the Urban Studies program welcomes applications for a Deans’ Faculty Fellows to teach a lecture and a seminar class (1 in Fall, 1 in Spring) about urbanization and urban life in a wide range of areas: histories of urban life and urbanization in modern and premodern periods in the United States or other parts of the world; ethnography of contemporary urban life in the U.S. or other parts of the world; social movements and community life; urban political economy, politics, or education; architecture, planning, urbanism, and the built environment; cities, suburbs, and regions, and more.an theory. Expertise and classes in “planetary urbanization” and global cities; urban ecology/environment; race, gender, sexuality, and inequality; or incarceration/policing/criminal justice are particularly welcome.

Applicant Background/Experience: The applicant would be expected to teach one sophomore or advanced seminar and one lecture class open to all students. We welcome applicants from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. Applicants should be able to demonstrate experience teaching in their field of expertise and a strong commitment to researching and teaching urban life, experience, and processes.

Contact(s): Samuel Zipp, Director; Meredith Paine, Academic Program Manager, Urban Studies