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Why Student Research Matters -- a Call for Nominations

The Graduate School is hosting its third Research Matters! event, featuring live talks by outstanding graduate students and post-docs on “why my research matters” in early November. Students, faculty and other community members are invited to make nominations by September 11, 2017. Students may nominate themselves. Those nominated will be invited to submit a synopsis of their research ideas and a short video of themselves presenting their scholarship due by September 19, 2017. Watch the video. | Learn more

Taylor-Singleton Named Simmons Scholar

Jalisia Taylor-Singleton, a new graduate student in Brown’s master's program in Urban Education Policy, was named the 2017 winner of the Ruth J. Simmons Urban Education Policy Scholarship, a full-tuition award.

The Board of Overseers of the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University established the permanent annual scholarship in 2012 for a UEP student who most epitomizes the former Brown University president’s commitment to education equity and social justice.

Student Research: Computer Models Provide New Understanding of Sickle Cell Disease

Computer models developed by Brown University mathematicians, including Lu Lu, an Applied Mathematics doctoral student, show new details of what happens inside a red blood cell affected by sickle cell disease. The researchers said they hope their models, described in an article in the Biophysical Journal, will help in assessing drug strategies to combat the genetic blood disorder, which affects millions of people worldwide.

Fulbright U.S Student Program Opportunities

The 2018-2019 Fulbright U.S. Student competition is open. To learn more about applying, please visit the Getting Started page. Brown's internal deadline for applications is September 12, 2017; learn more about the process here. This federal program enables students to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools worldwide.

Graduate Education: Brown to Participate in National Study of Doctoral Career Paths

Brown University is one of 29 institutions — and the only one in New England — selected to participate in a nationwide effort to study doctoral student aspirations and alumni careers in humanities and STEM fields, the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) announced. During the multi-year  project, universities will collect data from current Ph.D. students and alumni using CGS-developed surveys. The resulting information will allow universities to analyze Ph.D. career preferences and outcomes in order to strengthen career services, professional development opportunities and mentoring in doctoral programs. Brown will receive $80,000 in grant money to fund its participation.

Summer Scholars and Hazeltine Fellowship Winners Announced

From left to right: Liz Brennan, Felipe Brugués, Ann Daly, Kathrinne Duffy, and Prabhdeep KehalFrom left to right: Liz Brennan, Felipe Brugués, Ann Daly, Kathrinne Duffy, and Prabhdeep KehalThe Jonathan M. Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship has announced the winners of their Summer Scholarship and Hazeltine Fellowship for Graduate Research. Congratulations to the recipients: Liz Brennan, Felipe Brugués, Ann Daly, Kathrinne Duffy, and Prabhdeep Kehal. The Summer Scholars Program provides students with a living stipend to help them focus on addressing graduate student research questions in the realms of entrepreneurship education, diversity, and inequality, in ways that are academically rigorous. The Hazeltine Fellowship (administered through BEO) is awarded annually to support Brown Ph.D. and master students' research costs around promising areas of entrepreneurship. Read more about the winners.

Student Research: Sea Sponges Stay Put with Anchors that Bend but Don’t Break

Sea sponges known as Venus’ flower baskets remain fixed to the sea floor with nothing more than an array of thin, hair-like anchors made essentially of glass. It’s an important job, and new research by doctoral Engineering student Michael Monn, and others, suggests that it’s the internal architecture of those anchors, known as basalia spicules, that helps them to do it.