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March 19, 2015

Three members of the faculty have won major research fellowships this spring. Linford Fisher, who recently received tenure from the university, was named a Charles A. Ryskamp Fellow by the American Council of Learned Societies. Françoise Hamlin, who was tenured last year, has been awarded a Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. Lukas Rieppel, an assistant professor who joined the faculty in 2013, was appointed as a Visiting Scholar for 2015-16 at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Rieppel is the first member of the department to have won this award. Fisher is the third faculty member in recent years to have received a Ryskamp, while Hamlin is the fourth to have been named a Burkhardt. 

February 25, 2015

The next lecture in the "Carbon Nations" series is coming up on March 4, when Professor Myrna Santiago of St. Mary's University in California will be presenting a lecture entitled, "Foreign Corporations and Mexico's Ecology of Oil: Past and Present," at 4pm on the 3rd floor of the Science Library. Professor Santiago's first book, The Ecology of Oil: Environment, Labor, and the Mexican Revolution, 1900-1938, offered a rich case study of northern Veracruz, and illuminated the ways that oil production generates major environmental transformations in land tenure systems and social organisation.

The "Carbon Nations" series of six lectures in 2014-2015 is designed to do something important but rare: bring historians into debates about energy and climate change. Focusing largely on the U.S. and U.S. corporations abroad, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, Carbon Nations asserts a crucial premise: the carbon-based economy is a historical creation, a product of human culture and politics. Its transformation into something new thus requires a deep engagement with the culture and politics, as much as with the science and technology, of energy. The series has been organized by Robert Self, Royce Family Chair of Teaching Excellence and Professor of History.

January 19, 2015

The next lecture in the "Carbon Nations" series is coming up on February 5. Professor Timothy Mitchell of Columbia University will be giving a talk entitled, "Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil", at 4:00 PM in Smith-Buonnano 106. Professor Mitchell wrote a book of the same title, Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil, published with Verso Books in 2011. His study examines the  political consequences of global dependence on oil, both in regions such as the Middle East, which rely upon revenues from oil production, and in the places that have the greatest demand for energy.

The "Carbon Nations" series of six lectures in 2014-2015 is designed to do something important but rare: bring historians into debates about energy and climate change. Focusing largely on the U.S. and U.S. corporations abroad, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, Carbon Nations asserts a crucial premise: the carbon-based economy is a historical creation, a product of human culture and politics. Its transformation into something new thus requires a deep engagement with the culture and politics, as much as with the science and technology, of energy. The series has been organized by Robert Self, Royce Family Chair of Teaching Excellence and Professor of History.


Carbon Nations PosterCarbon Nations Poster

January 8, 2015

The Brown History Department had another strong showing at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, held from January 2-January 5 in New York City.  Professor Rebecca Nedostup organized, chaired, and presented in a panel entitled “Networks of the Dead: Politics, Ethics, Technologies and Method.” Professor Robert Self participated in a roundtable discussion on the “Crisis of the 1970s” while Professor Omer Bartov contributed to a roundtable on the role of history and historians in the ongoing crisis in Ukraine.  Professor Jane Kamensky was among the commentators featured in a roundtable discussion on the state of the relationship between history and literature. Professor Maud Mandel took part in a discussion of the divisions and intersections between Jewish History and General History.

Panelists in other sessions included Professor Jennifer Lambe, who shared her research on the relationship between psychiatry and popular mental healers in a session on psychiatric and medicine in Latin America; Professor Faiz Ahmed, who gave a paper entitled “Contested Subjects: Ottoman and British Jurisdictional Quarrels over Afghans and Indians Abroad, 1878–1914”; and Professor Tracy Steffes, who offered a historical perspective on methods of evaluating learning at the college level.

Professor Steven Lubar chaired a session on “Scholarship Beyond Text”, which highlighted research deploying new investigative technologies and collaborations with artists, architects, filmmakers, and designers, to upend conventional understandings of historical phenomena. Professor Jo Guldi chaired a session, entitled “People and Technology: Comparing Road Building across Three Continents“, which explored the connections between roads as they existed as material objects in their environment, and their human histories and cultural meanings.

Additional information and abstracts about any of the sessions can be found at the links highlighted above, or by clicking on individual conference participants’ names within the index at the American Historical Association Meeting website.

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