"In their content and their objectives, Race, Power, and Privilege (RPP) courses examine issues of structural inequality, racial formations and/or disparities, and systems of power within a complex, pluralistic world

  • the ways different forms of power and privilege construct racial and identity formations in the U.S. and/or globally; the cultural, political, and intellectual responses to this racialization;

  • how categories of race and ethnicity are produced intersectionally in relation to other hierarchical structures of difference including gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, ability, citizenship status, and geography;

  • the structures, institutions, practices, and attitudes that enable, maintain, or mitigate domestic and/or global disparities in health, income, education outcomes, media representations, etc.;

  • the ways in which disciplinary structures of knowledge have been embedded in such historical formations as racism and colonialism."

Fall 2022

Spring 2023

First-Year Seminar Courses

HIST 0558C LatinX Social Movement History, Mark Ocegueda

 

HIST 0559B Asian American and Third World Solidarity, Naoko Shibusawa
 

Second-Year Seminar Courses

None Offered.
 

"Gateway" Intro Lecture Courses

HIST 0244 Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to Present, Sreemati Mitter
 

Lecture Courses

HIST 1080 Humanitarianism / Conflict in Africa, Jennifer Johnson

 

HIST 1120 At China’s Edges, Rebecca Nedostup

 

HIST 1272D The French Revolution, Joel Revill

 

HIST 1320 Rebel Island: Cuba, 1492-Present, Jennifer Lambe

 

HIST 1515 American Slavery, Emily Owens

 

HIST 1553 Empires in America to 1890, Naoko Shibusawa
 

Capstone Courses

None Offered.

First-Year Seminar Courses

None Offered.
 

Second-Year Seminar Courses

HIST 0656A History of Intercollegiate Athletics, Howard Chudacoff


HIST 0678A What Do Concubines Have to Do with It? Gender, Sexuality, and Status in the Premodern World, Stacey Murrell
 

"Gateway" Intro Lecture Courses

HIST 0234 Modern Latin America, Daniel Rodriguez

 

HIST 0256 Introduction to LatinX History, Mark Ocegueda
 

Lecture Courses

HIST 1202 Formation of the Classical Heritage: Greeks, Romans, Jews, Christians, and Muslims, Ken Sacks
 

HIST 1310 History of Brazil, Jim Green

 

HIST 1554 American Empire since 1890, Naoko Shibusawa
 

Capstone Courses

HIST 1964L Slavery in the Early Modern World Th 4-6:30pm Adam Teller

 

HIST 1967L Life in Brazil under Military Rule, Jim Green

 

HIST 1969F Understanding Modern Middle East History through Literature, Sreemati Mitter

 

HIST 1977I Gender, Race and Medicine in the Americas, Daniel Rodriguez