21st-Century PhD

Through the 21st-Century PhD series, the Cogut Institute, in partnership with departments, centers, institutes, and initiatives at Brown, seeks to advance programming and broader discussions on the structure, experience, and aspirations of the PhD degree.

Upcoming Events

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Previous Events

  • Live from the Field: History and Humanities PhDs in University Administration

    Featuring

    Ferentz LaFargue, Dean of the College, Saybrook College, Yale University

    Laura Perille, Associate Director, Office of Fellowships, Awards, and Resources, Georgetown University

    Joel Revill, Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Adjunct Assistant Professor of History, Brown University

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

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  • Data can be an important part of a humanities research project. It can provide new insights into your work, offering new ways to understand and make sense of your subject matter. Digital humanities can be an important part of the 21st century Ph.D.’s professional skill set.

    Working with data means you need to be concerned with that data at every stage of the project. Where does it come from? How accessible is it? How has it been cleaned? How will it be preserved? How do you negotiate the choices that need to be made as you move from research questions to argument and presentation?

    Join us for a workshop on the choices you need to make when you decide to use data as part of a scholarly project. CDS staff and their graduate student partners will discuss their digital projects. How were they designed and produced? What decisions did they make about tools and process? How did that shape the project and the results? What did they learn, what choices did they make, and what would they do differently next time?

    Featured speakers and projects include, among others:

    • Talya Housman (Ph.D., History, 2019), on her dissertation “‘To Plunder All Under the Petty-Coate’: Prosecuting Sexual Crime and Gendered Violence in The English Revolution” and the database she created.
    • George Elliott (Ph.D. Candidate, History), gathering data about 17th-century Connecticut alchemist Gershom Bulkeley.
    • Maiah Letsch (Graduate Student, History, Utrecht University), on her work with the Database of Indigenous Slavery in the Americas.

    This workshop is aimed at humanities scholars and students without a background in digital scholarship. Many of these issues are also of concern for projects in the sciences and social sciences, and all are welcome.

    Presented by the Center for Digital Scholarship, the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century Ph.D. Series, and the Data Science Initiative.

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  • Alumni Stories: Brown History PhDs and Tenure-track Faculty Careers at Public Universities

    featuring

    Sara Fingal, Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies, California State University, Fullerton

    Alicia Maggard, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Auburn University

    Tshombe Miles, Associate Professor, Department of Black and Latino Studies, Baruch College, City University of New York

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • Live from the Field: History PhDs in High School Teaching and Administration

    featuring

    Christopher Jones, Instructor, Department of History and Social Science, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA

    Marisela Ramos, Chair and Instructor, Department of History and Social Science, and LGBTQ+ Adult Coordinator, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA

    Anthony Watson, Instructor, Department of History, Woodberry Forest School, Woodberry Forest, VA

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • In this hands-on workshop, participants received feedback on their public writing pitch in small breakout groups from guest public writers Erin Bartram (historian of 19th-century America, women, and religion), Sarah Scullin (classicist and former managing editor of Eidolon), and Fatima Husain ’17 (managing producer of the sustainability science radio show Possibly, host of MIT Abstracts, and MIT PhD student in Geobiology) as well as Charles Carroll, Assistant Director of the Sheridan Center/Writing Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of History, and Brown University doctoral students Erica Meszaros and Sara Mohr, managing editors of the public scholarship blog The Ratty.

    The Zoom meeting information was distributed to participants the day before the event. Participants were asked to submit a draft pitch of 2-5 sentences by February 17, noon. Graduate students across disciplines were especially welcome to register. 

    Participants had the opportunity to ask additional questions about exploring venues to publish public writing and resources available at Brown University as well as to submit pitches for consideration by The Ratty.

    This workshop was presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century PhD series and by the Writing Center/Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD, Humanities, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • When and why to write for the public? What should you consider when making your pitch? What does the editing process look like?

    Guest panelists and public writers Erin Bartram (historian of 19th-century America, women, and religion), Sarah Scullin (classicist and former managing editor of Eidolon), and Fatima Husain ’17 (managing producer of the sustainability science radio show Possibly, host of MIT Abstracts, and MIT PhD student in Geobiology) shared their thoughts on what makes for good public writing in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The session was moderated by Charles Carroll, Assistant Director of the Writing Center/Sheridan Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of History, together with Brown University doctoral students Erica Meszaros and Sara Mohr, managing editors of the public scholarship blog The Ratty.

    This online event, open to the public, was presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century PhD series and by the Writing Center/Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.

    Image: From ground (2010) wool-felt carpet installation by Ann Hamilton in Pembroke Hall

    More Information 21st-Century PhD, Humanities, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Historians in Quarantine, Part III: On Digital History Publishing During and After COVID-19

    featuring

    John Bodel, Professor of Classics and History, Brown University

    Elias Muhanna, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and History, Brown University

    Tara Nummedal, Professor of History and Italian Studies, Brown University

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

     

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: https://brown.zoom.us/j/96512244107

    This workshop on print and digital publishing focuses on practical considerations and real possibilities for graduate students in Italian Studies. Topics include identifying publishing opportunities; working with editors; navigating peer review and the revision process; copyright guidance; selecting programs, tools, and platforms; and other issues. A list of readings and resources will circulate in advance of the workshop. An art historian educated at Bryn Mawr College, Levy has published widely on early modern Italy and serves as founding General Editor of the Amsterdam University Press book series Visual and Material Culture, 1300-1700. She was previously founding General Editor of the Routledge series Visual Culture in Early Modernity. Her research has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Association of University Women, the Getty Research Institute, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and the Bogliasco Foundation, among others. She currently serves as Co-Chair of the College Art Association Committee on Research and Scholarship.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD, Education, Teaching, Instruction, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Libraries, MCM, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • What access difficulties does the pandemic present for fields dependent on site-based research (such as archeology, anthropology, art history, history, sociology, and more?) Are access difficulties specific to Asian studies that predated the pandemic being exacerbated by present conditions? What are strategies for redesigning or adapting research agendas in light of such considerations? How should this ​juncture​ prompt us to reconceive ​career markers and planning​?

     

    Roundtable speakers:

    • Tina Mai Chen, Distinguished Professor and Department Head, History; Acting Director, Asian Studies Centre; University of Manitoba
    • Wai Yee Chiong, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, RISD Museum
    • Sharon Domier, East Asian Studies Librarian, Amherst College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    • Devin Fitzgerald, Curator of Rare Books and History of Printing, UCLA Library
    • Robert P. Weller, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Anthropology, Boston University

     

    This series of three webinars addresses the roles that scholars in the Asian/Pacific studies communities and allied fields can play in building a humanistic context for the current pandemic. They will address the urgent crises that public health, political, social, and economic conditions present to students and scholars in daily life, research, and work. The public is welcome; pre-registration required.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • Historians in Quarantine, Part II: On Digital History Teaching During and After COVID-19

    Monday, November 9th, 2020, 11 AM - 12 Noon Eastern Time

    featuring

    Dr. Cindy Nguyen  Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of History and Cogut Institute for the Humanities, Brown University

    Join Cindy Nguyen as she talks through concrete activities, tools, and materials, on remote digital teaching for history seminars. Drawing from her experience in critical pedagogy, inclusive design, and digital humanities, Nguyen will share three guiding principles (variation of modality, time management, and built in reflection) and how these approaches are built into the class structure and assignments. The session will conclude with time for Q&A and group discussion of challenges and experiences teaching during COVID.

    Moderated by Faiz Ahmed, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Advising, Department of History

    This is a live Zoom Event. Registration is Required.  To register for this event, please click the following link:

    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwtd-igrTwjHNYsBEDxS2tD-ZWVHThxnPzG

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

    All Brown University faculty, students, and staff are welcome to attend this event. For any questions on the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series and Digital History Forum of which this event forms a part, please contact the moderator, [email protected]

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  • Facing Precarity: Envisioning Careers in 2020 and Beyond

    What are resources for graduate students emerging into a collapsed academic job market? What kinds of skills and experiences should scholars in global Asian studies and other fields reliant on heretofore comparatively robust academic hiring adopt from extant programs and peers in other fields? What are the differences in hiring and work cultures outside the US? How should degree-holders prepare themselves for possible immigration and work restrictions in an age of economic austerity? And what are some ways that PhD holders have adapted their careers to shifting personal, intellectual, and economic circumstances?

     

    John Paul Christy, Senior Director of U.S. Programs, American Council of Learned Societies

    Ya-pei Kuo, Universitair Docent, University of Groningen

    Heather Ruth Lee, Undergraduate Coordinator of Humanities; Assistant Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Assistant Professor, NYU

    Huwy-min Lucia Liu, Assistant Professor, Sociology and Anthropology, George Mason University

    Emily Swafford, Director of Academic and Professional Affairs, American Historical Association

    Paul Vierthaler, Assistant Professor of Chinese Studies, William and Mary

     

    Webinar Series: Asian Studies (and beyond) for the Pandemic Age

    This series of three webinars addresses the roles that scholars in the Asian/Pacific studies communities and allied fields can play in building a humanistic context for the current pandemic. They will address the urgent crises that public health, political, social, and economic conditions present to students and scholars in daily life, research, and work. The public is welcome; pre-registration required.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD, Humanities