Collaborative Humanities

The Collaborative Humanities Initiative promotes collaborative practices that expand or transform modes of research, teaching, and learning in the humanities and across disciplines. Through dedicated events and courses, the Initiative fosters an expanded sense of intellectual community for scholars and students dedicated to thinking together across disciplines, frameworks, and locations. Read more.

Upcoming Events

  • May
    1
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught in Spring 2020 by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English, and Brian Meeks, Professor of Africana Studies.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is free and open to the public.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences

Previous Events

  • May
    9
    8:30am - 6:30pm

    Conference • “Feeling Its Presence: Race and the Poetics of Affect”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conference takes up the intersections between critical race theory, affect theory, and poetics as a way of exploring how the formal innovation and experimentation engaged in by poets of color is connected in complex and myriad ways to the contexts that shape their production and reception — contexts in which structures of race play a significant role. It does so by addressing the soft boundaries that connect aesthetic expressions of racialized affect found in works by poets such as Berssenbrugge and Rankine and the various theoretical frameworks of affect theory associated with thinkers like Ahmed, Deleuze, Fanon, and Tomkins. In so doing, Feeling Its Presence stages an engagement with the powerful argument that Dorothy Wang makes in her book Thinking Its Presence on behalf of a historically sensitive mode of critical formalism attuned to the relationship between poetic form and “the larger social, historical, and political contexts that produced the poet’s subjectivity.”

    The scholars presenting their work are graduate students enrolled in the collaborative humanities seminar “Theories of Affect: Poetics of Expression Through and Beyond Identity” (HMAN 2400K) taught by Daniel Kim and Ada Smailbegovic. The conference concludes, appropriately enough, with a lecture by Dorothy Wang, Professor of American Studies at Williams College and the author of Thinking its Presence: Form, Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2014).

    Schedule

    Thursday, May 9
    8:30 AM – 9:00 AM Morning Coffee
    9:00 AM – 9:15 AM Opening Remarks
    9:15 AM – 11:00 AM Panel 1: Migrant Orientations: Dislocation, Materiality, Transfiguration

    Thomas Dai • “Vagrant Acts: The Poetics of Jenny Xie and Kai Carlson-Wee”
    MJ Cunniff • “‘Scarlet itself is matter:’ Lyric Perceptibility in Mei-mei Berssenbrugge”
    Katey Preston • “‘Gold or Gold-Coloured:’ Transfiguration in Mercedes Eng’s Prison Industrial Complex Explodes

    11:00 AM – 11:15 AM Break
    11:15 AM – 1:00 PM Panel 2: Dictee

    Ashley Dun • “The Corpus of Exile in Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Visual Texts”
    Kelsey-Yichi Ma • “Vulnerability and the Invulnerable Narrative: The Second Person in Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee
    Erin Prior • “‘Stand as a run stands:’ Identity as Epistemology in Theresa Cha’s Dictee

    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM Lunch Break
    2:00 PM – 3:45 PM Panel 3: Affective Bodies

    Noah Brooksher • “Poetics, Ethics, Contingency: The Letter of the Future, or the Future as Letter”
    Mariam Abou-Kathir • “‘The Body’s Crime of Living:’ Epic Temporality and Generational Trauma in Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky with Exit Wounds
    Amber Vistein • “Stuck in the Throat: Theorizing Oral Expressivity in Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric

     3:45 pm – 4:00 pm Break 
     4:00 pm – 5:30 pm Dorothy Wang • “English Poetry and the ‘Afterlife’ of Colonialism”
    5:30 pm – 6:30 pm Reception

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, the Departments of American Studies, Comparative Literature, English, and Modern Culture and Media, the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, and the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Apr
    26
    8:30am - 5:45pm

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the first offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught this Spring 2019 by Amanda Anderson, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English, and Tamara Chin, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and East Asian Studies.

    Over the course of the semester, participants in the seminar have developed and workshopped a paper central to their core doctoral work. In addition, all participants have performed a number of diverse roles: they have nominated and then introduced a text that was formative for their scholarly development; they have served as first questioners for papers workshopped by others; and they have interviewed one of their peers and prepared a formal introduction of their work. The course provides training for roles that are crucial to the form and quality of academic and public life but that are seldom an object of study and practice in themselves.

    The conference features talks by anthropologist Rosalind Morris (Columbia University) and political scientist Corey Robin (Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center) as well as Brown University graduate students Chris DiBona (Religious Studies), Aaron Jacobs (History), Nechama Juni (Religious Studies), Irina Kalinka (Modern Culture and Media), Pedro Lopes de Almeida (Portuguese and Brazilian Studies), Stephen Marsh (English), Caleb Murray (Religious Studies), N’Kosi Oates (Africana Studies), Urszula Rutkowska (English) and Jan Tabor (German Studies).

    Brown University faculty Melvin Rogers, Associate Professor of Political Science, and Ellen Rooney, Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence in English and Modern Culture and Media, serve as respondents along with Rosalind Morris and Corey Robin.

    Read the full program

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is free and open to the public.

     

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Oct
    27

    In South Asian art, the distinction between the “secular” and the “religious,” further complicated by the “spiritual,” has been fraught with contestations. In this symposium, art historians, historians, and philosophers examine the entanglement of art history’s categories and practices with the politics of the present. The symposium positions itself at the cusp of two dominant discourses: (i) the lingering Orientalist and nationalist projections that emphasize the “religious” nature of South Asian artistic traditions as against Western secularization; (ii) the assertion of the place of art within the modern secular life of nations, which posits the transitions of objects from earlier religious to new artistic denominations.

    Speakers and Participants: Amanda Anderson, Brown University; Ariella Azoulay, Brown University; Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University; Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University; Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University; Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, and Cogut Institute; Kajri Jain, University of Toronto; Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, San Francisco State University; Sonal Khullar, University of Washington, Seattle; Jinah Kim, Harvard University; Leora Maltz-Leca, Rhode Island School of Design; Saloni Mathur, UCLA; Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University; Tamara Sears, Rutgers University; Kavita Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Foad Torshizi, Rhode Island School of Design; Laura Weinstein, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Karin Zitzewitz, Michigan State University.

    The symposium’s schedule as well as abstracts and speaker bios are available here .

    Co-organized by Tapati Guha-Thakurta and Vazira Zamindar, the symposium is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its Collaborative Humanities Initiative  and by the Center for Contemporary South Asia of the Watson Institute as part of Art History from the South .

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • Oct
    26

    In South Asian art, the distinction between the “secular” and the “religious,” further complicated by the “spiritual,” has been fraught with contestations. In this symposium, art historians, historians, and philosophers examine the entanglement of art history’s categories and practices with the politics of the present. The symposium positions itself at the cusp of two dominant discourses: (i) the lingering Orientalist and nationalist projections that emphasize the “religious” nature of South Asian artistic traditions as against Western secularization; (ii) the assertion of the place of art within the modern secular life of nations, which posits the transitions of objects from earlier religious to new artistic denominations.

    Speakers and Participants: Amanda Anderson, Brown University; Ariella Azoulay, Brown University; Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University; Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University; Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University; Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, and Cogut Institute; Kajri Jain, University of Toronto; Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, San Francisco State University; Sonal Khullar, University of Washington, Seattle; Jinah Kim, Harvard University; Leora Maltz-Leca, Rhode Island School of Design; Saloni Mathur, UCLA; Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University; Tamara Sears, Rutgers University; Kavita Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Foad Torshizi, Rhode Island School of Design; Laura Weinstein, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Karin Zitzewitz, Michigan State University.

    The symposium’s schedule as well as abstracts and speaker bios are available here .

    Co-organized by Tapati Guha-Thakurta and Vazira Zamindar, the symposium is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its Collaborative Humanities Initiative and by the Center for Contemporary South Asia of the Watson Institute as part of Art History from the South .

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • Oct
    17
    8:00pm

    Audiovision: Animating Obsolescence

    Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

    Oct 17, 8:00 pm | FREE
    Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

    An exploration of historical media featuring groundbreaking works, including Conlon Nancarrow’s Studies for Player Piano, György Ligeti’s Poème Symphonique (for 100 metronomes), John Cage’s Williams Mix (for eight simultaneously played independent magnetic tape machines) and Butch Rovan’s Winding Up

    Presented by Brown Arts Initiative and Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities
  • Oct
    4
    3:00pm - 5:30pm

    Collaborative Reading • Franz Kafka, “The Castle”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Students of the Collaborative Humanities Seminar led by Adi Ophir and Peter Szendy (“It’s About Time: Temporalities of Waiting in Theory, Literature, and Film,” HMAN 2400G), will present a staged collective reading of selected passages from Franz Kafka’s The Castle (trans. Anthea Bell [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009]). By working on the length, speed, and duration of the passages, as well as on the alternating of the reading voices, they will experiment with a performative approach to the analysis of temporality in the novel.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities
  • Sep
    19
    6:00pm - 8:30pm

    Film Screening • Lars von Trier, “Melancholia”

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    A screening of Lars von Trier’s 2011 film Melancholia, in which two sisters find their already strained relationship challenged as a mysterious new planet threatens to collide with Earth. The film stars Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg, and Kiefer Sutherland. Peter Szendy, David Herlihy Professor of Humanities and Comparative Literature, will give a short introduction. This screening is presented as part of the collaborative humanities seminar  “It’s About Time: Temporalities of Waiting in Theory, Literature, and Film” taught by Peter Szendy and Adi Ophir. 

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities