Events

  • Feb
    7

    Andrea Sartori, PhD Candidate in Italian Studies,“Darwin’s Traces: The Struggle for Life in a Literary Perspective.”

    Abstract: This paper analyzes the multiple meanings and the textual origin of the metaphor “struggle for life” in Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species(1859). The paper argues that, in Darwin’s work, nature and factuality are neither the ultimate grounds of evolutionary epistemology, nor the unquestionable basis of Darwin’s understanding of man and society. This circumstance allows the reader of On the Origin of Speciesto be involved in a narrative experience on the one hand, and to be aware of the ideological (mis)interpretations of Darwin’s image of nature on the other.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • Anne Dunlop, Herald Chair of Fine Arts, School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne

    “The Mongols between Medieval Italy and Modern Seoul.”

    Abstract : This presentation comes out of a current research project on artistic links between Mongol Eurasia and late-medieval Italy (c. 1240-1340), and a survey article on the topic written for a Korean audience. Marco Polo is only one case of a much larger and renewed Eurasian circulation of objects, peoples, and ideas in the Mongol period, but researching this history raises important issues of definition, source, and method, beginning with how we define and discuss artistic or cultural translation. Writing for an East Asian audience brought further challenges of language and disciplinary boundaries.

    History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • Sergio Luzzatto, Emiliana Pasca Noether Chair in Modern Italian History, University of Connecticut at Storrs

    “The Red Brigades in 1970s Italy: a personal interpretation.”

    Abstract : A close reading of the Red Brigades social implantation, political discourse, and militant activity points to a historical rationale, where the terrorist option figures as a pretty logical choice for a small group of social and political outcasts: young second-generation immigrants from the Italian South to the North who never fully adapted to the way of life in the Industrial Triangle. This presentation has also a personal dimension since it focuses on a single terrorist – Sicilian-born Riccardo Dura (1950-1980) – as the embodiment of a collective destiny, and the city of Genoa where the presenter came of age.

    History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Alessandro Moghrabi, PhD Candidate in Comparative Literature

    “The Gift That Keeps on Giving: gift, narration, and repetition among Derrida, Calvino, and Kierkegaard.”

    Abstract: This paper builds upon Jacques Derrida’s theory of the pure gift in Given Time, and proposes a comparative analysis of Derrida’s gift, Calvino’s novel If on a winter’s night a traveler, and Kierkegaard’s Repetitionin order to develop a theory of reading that allows for a pure Derridian gift to be possible in narration.

    History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • “AlterLife: Italo Calvino and the Biosphere of the Anthropocene.”

    Prof. Serenella Iovino, Professor of Italian Studies & Environmental Humanities, University of North Carolina

    Abstract : This presentation explores the Anthropocene biosphere with the help of a classic of Italian literature: Italo Calvino. Through Calvino’s stories of cats, ants, chickens, rabbits, and other nonhuman creatures, a challenging new figure emerges from the mirror: that of an anthropos without a capital “A,” with its fragile balances, its challenges and inequalities, a companion species on a difficult path of coevolution.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences