Courses for Fall 2016

  • Believers, Agnostics, and Atheists in Contemporary Fiction and Memoirs

    In recent decades, there has been a resurgence of religiosity in contemporary society, while at the same time many have been skeptical and even hostile to religious belief and practice. Others are just not sure what to believe. We will study selections of fiction and memoirs by writers of Christian and Jewish background that explore such situations as the affirmation or negation of the existence of God, the role of religious ritual in a person’s life, and the positive and negative impacts on society of religious institutions and the clergy who lead them. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL LILE WRIT FYS
    JUDS 0050A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
  • Difficult Relations? Judaism and Christianity from the Middle Ages until the Present

    Jewish and Christian identity in Europe has traditionally been closely connected to the ways the two religions view each other. Mutual admiration, influence, and hatred have combined together in a difficult relationship, fundamental to European history. In this course, we will survey that relationship, examining some key issues and events which shaped it. The Jews' attitudes and actions will be examined alongside those of their Christian neighbors. Topics covered include: medieval revulsion and attraction; early modern re-evaluations of Judaism and Christianity; modern Christian anti-Semitism, Jewish diplomacy, and the Holocaust; the effects of Vatican II; Israel and the contemporary Christian world. FYS LILE WRIT DPLL
    JUDS 0050M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Elementary Hebrew

    An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. If registration is closed, please contact the professor and a wait list will be created. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special permission. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: JUDS 0200 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration, please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    JUDS 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Writing and Speaking Hebrew

    Enables students to improve their skills in speaking and writing Hebrew on a variety of topics. Features advanced work on language structure and active language practice in the classroom. Class discussions of Israeli current events draw on Israeli stories, poems, television programs, and films and on the Israeli press. Students also compose essays and stories in Hebrew. Prerequisite: JUDS 0400 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Jews and Money

    This course will investigate both Jewish religious texts concerning money, economy, wealth, and poverty and the historical conditions that led to pernicious stereotypes of Jews. Moving chronologically from antiquity to the present, we will examine questions such as: What is the Bible's ideal economy? Are the poor closer to God? Are there better or worse ways to make a living? What responsibilities, if any, do the rich have to the poor? Where did Shylock come from? Goals of the course include providing new ways to think about issues of economy and money and improving one's writing. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 0683 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • The Bible as Literature

    Explores how methods of literary analysis can be applied to the reading of narratives of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (in English translation). Also compares the ways that modern writers have transformed biblical stories into new interpretive literary works. For students interested in an introduction to the Bible, as well as students with a knowledge of the Bible who want to deepen their understanding of biblical narratives and investigate the influence of the Bible on modern literature. All readings in English. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 0830 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
  • Heidegger, the Jews, and the Crisis of Liberalism

    This class explores the enduring legacy of Heidegger’s critique of Western philosophy in political, theological, and social thought. Focusing primarily upon Heidegger’s reception in 20th-century Jewish philosophy, we will explore the allure of Heideggerian thought and its implication in both left and right political critiques of liberalism. Topics include onto-theology, phenomenology, and radical historicism; science, hermeneutics, and methodology in the humanities; liberalism and the secular; ethics, politics, action; de-structuration and deconstruction; time and the Other. Authors include Adorno, Arendt, Butler, Derrida, Levinas, Löwith, Marcuse, Rosenzweig, Schmitt, Strauss. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 1614 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nahme
  • Problems in Israelite Religion and Ancient Judaism

    A series of topics in Israelite religion and ancient Judaism which are of current scholarly interest are explored in a seminar setting. Students are encouraged to read widely and pursue individual research interests. The course assumes a basic knowledge of biblical literature and scholarly criticism. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 1625 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • The Talmud

    Written from the first - seventh centuries CE, the Talmud (which runs to 20 volumes) contains law, lore, theological speculation, and complex argumentation. We will read a selection in depth and examine both traditional and modern critical (e.g. historical and literary) approaches to this fundamental text. No prerequisites; all texts in English translation. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 1630 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brink-Danan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Kraemer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research