Courses for Spring 2020

JUDS

  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Bible and Moral Debate

    How was the Bible employed in past moral debates that divided American society, e.g., debates over the legitimacy of slavery? How is the Bible used in contemporary moral discourse, e.g., concerning abortion, capital punishment and gay rights? What does the Bible really have to say about such issues? This course will consider these and other questions through a close reading of pertinent texts which address topics such as abortion, homosexuality, capital punishment, immigration, gender, family violence, race and slavery, disability, genocide, the environment and inequality of wealth. No prerequisites.
    JUDS 0060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • On the Margins of the Bible: Jewish and Christian Non-Canonical Texts

    Ancient Jews and Christians produced many texts that were not canonized in the Bible, texts often as interesting, beautiful, or theologically rewarding as those later canonized. Why were they not also included? What was the process of canonization, and who was in charge? What were the contexts that produced the non-canonical texts? Were the texts omitted at odds with the mainstream, or even dangerous? What value did they have in the ancient world, and what value do they hold today for historical understanding? We will study some of the best of these texts, comparing them to biblical texts.
    JUDS 1603 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wills
  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture and Language

    Yiddish was the language spoken by most Jews in Eastern Europe and the countries to which they emigrated (including the U.S., England, South Africa, South American countries, and Israel) from the nineteenth century until after the Holocaust. It was the basis for a transnational Jewish culture and literature, and it played a central role in modern Jewish political life. We will explore the history of Yiddish culture and the development of the Yiddish press, literature, and cinema. The connection between Yiddish and modern Jewish politics will also be discussed. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to develop a basic knowledge of the Yiddish language.
    JUDS 1713 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • History of the State of Israel: 1948 to the Present

    This course surveys the history of Israel from its Proclamation of Independence in 1948 until today. Israel's history has unfolded under the shadow of its prolonged conflict with the Palestinians and its Arab neighbors. At the same time, an entirely new, vibrant and dynamic society and culture has developed there. This course aims to familiarize the student with the major outlines of Israel's development, and with different narratives and interpretations of that history. The reading materials and class discussions will examine not only the Arab-Israeli conflict, but also its influence on Israeli politics, society and culture.
    JUDS 1711 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • Money, Power, Sex and Love: Gender and the Family in Modern Jewish History

    Traditional Jewish society was patriarchal, though the forms this power took changed over time. It was also limited, even subverted, by various roles played by women. Since Jewish family life was very much under the control of Jewish women, the family was another place where women were able to wield power. Examining the history of gender and family allows us to examine the limits of patriarchal control and construct a new, often surprising picture of how Jewish society actually functioned. It also sheds new light on how the various forms of modern Jewish family we recognize today grew and developed.
    JUDS 1722 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Jewish Women: Between Conformity and Agency

    This seminar studies Jewish women in different temporal and geographical contexts, internally within their own communities and externally with other neighboring religious groups. Visual and material sources (iconography, artifacts, architectures, film) are examined in dialogue with texts (biblical and Talmudic writings, medieval and modern commentaries, contemporary literature) to explore the binary of male authority and female agency. Case studies will encompass the Middle East and Europe from antiquity to the present.
    JUDS 1617 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Galor
  • Antisemitism: A History

    Antisemitism is sometimes called the "longest hatred," and from Pittsburgh to Paris it is on the rise. This course will examine the history of antisemitism and antisemitic tropes; theoretical approaches to its persistence; and individual case studies. Topics will include: Christian and Muslim anti-Judaism; racism; economic stereotypes; and modern manifestations in the U.S. and Europe. Class assignments will be largely be project-based.
    JUDS 0063 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • Gender in Early Jewish and Christian Narratives

    Many of the favorite narratives of Jews and Christians in the ancient period (for this course, about 400 BCE to 300 CE) featured women characters or emphasized issues of gender: Esther, Judith, and Susanna; Mary Magdalene and other gospel women, or Thecla, the perhaps legendary companion of Paul. Both Jewish and Christian texts used gender to explore new ways of constructing heroic women and men that either re-inscribed or challenged traditional roles. This seminar takes up a close reading of narrative texts, compared also with wisdom texts (Proverbs, Ben Sira, Wisdom of Solomon, Avot).
    JUDS 0606 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wills
  • Archaeology, Materiality, + National Imagination in Israel + Greece:A Comparative Approach(ARCH1425)

HEBR

  • Elementary Hebrew

    This is the second half of a year-long course, an introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. Prerequisite: HEBR 0100. Students must have taken HEBR 0100 for credit to receive credit for this course. Exceptions must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HEBR 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: HEBR 0300 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    HEBR 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda

BHBR

  • Readings in Biblical Hebrew

    An introduction to the reading of biblical texts in Hebrew. Reading of selected texts from narrative, law, and poetry in the Hebrew Bible, with a few texts in post-classical Hebrew (the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Mishnah) introduced late in the semester. Intended for students who have completed BHBR 0100; others should consult the instructor.
    BHBR 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bisbee