Courses for Fall 2019

JUDS

  • Difficult Relations? Judaism and Christianity from the Middle Ages until the Present

    Jewish and Christian identity in Europe has traditionally been closely connected to the ways the two religions view each other. Mutual admiration, influence, and hatred have combined together in a difficult relationship, fundamental to European history. In this course, we will survey that relationship, examining some key issues and events which shaped it. The Jews' attitudes and actions will be examined alongside those of their Christian neighbors. Topics covered include: medieval revulsion and attraction; early modern re-evaluations of Judaism and Christianity; modern Christian anti-Semitism, Jewish diplomacy, and the Holocaust; the effects of Vatican II; Israel and the contemporary Christian world.
    JUDS 0050M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • War and Peace in the Hebrew Bible and its Environment

    An examination of the role of war and peace in the Hebrew Bible and in texts and art of ancient Israel’s neighbors. Topics include divine beings, war and peace-making; peace treaties; explaining defeat and victory; ideologies of warfare; the treatment of prisoners, corpses and captured bones; the warrior as masculine ideal; civil war and coups; treaty obligations; ritual dimensions of war and peace (e.g., mourning, animal sacrifice, child sacrifice, divination, memorializing war); visual representations of war as propaganda; the idea of a future, eschatological war between the forces of good and the forces of evil. No prerequisites.
    JUDS 0670 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • How Bible Became Holy

    Over the past 2,000 years, people have killed and died for the Bible, and it continues to exercise a powerful if contested role in modern politics. Yet how did it achieve this power? This course will trace the development of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) from its origins in ancient Israel to its development about five hundred years later as a foundational text of both Judaism and Christianity. The focus will be on how Jews and early Christians throughout antiquity understood and ascribed authority to the Bible. No prior knowledge necessary.
    JUDS 0682 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • The Language of Religious Faith

    A course on the ways poetry provides a language of religious faith that emerges from the sense of a divine presence in human experience. We will explore how this language of religious faith expresses a wide range of both negative and positive responses by those seeking a relationship with this divine presence, including fear, doubt, guilt, abandonment, ecstasy, gratefulness, hopefulness, and security. Our study of this phenomenon will yield insights into the relationship between psychology and spirituality. Sources will include the biblical books of Psalms and Job and contemporary Jewish and Christian poetry.
    JUDS 0820 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
  • Jewish and Christian Identity in the Ancient Period

    The modern engagement with the many ways that we construct identity has been matched by a similar wave of studies about identity construction in the ancient world. In this course we will discuss the rise of “Judaism” and “Jewish identity” in the ancient period (looking at roughly 400 BCE-200 CE), and compare it with the movement of the followers of Jesus as a negotiation of a new identity within Judaism (roughly 30 CE-200 CE). We will conclude with the question of the “Parting of the Ways” of these two groups.
    JUDS 1601 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wills
  • Problems in Israelite Religion and Ancient Judaism

    A series of topics in Israelite religion and ancient Judaism which are of current scholarly interest are explored in a seminar setting. Students are encouraged to read widely and pursue individual research interests. The course assumes a basic knowledge of biblical literature and scholarly criticism. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 1625 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • Jewish Humor and Commercial Entertainment in Early 20th-Century Europe and America

    The seminar explores the relationship between humor, popular culture and Jewish ethnic identity in early 20th-century Europe and America. It argues that self-deprecating humor and satiric performance of Jewish stereotypes were not expressions of self-hatred, but complex cultural gestures that led to in integration within mainstream society. Topics to be considered are: the joke as a social gesture; the Jewish music hall as an urban institution;the politics of blackface in American Vaudeville; the East-European Jews in Hollywood.
    JUDS 1726 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Digging for the Bible: Science, Religion, and Politics

    Archaeological exploration in the “Holy Land” began in the mid-19th century and was motivated by the quest to discover the biblical sites. This region features among the most important visual and material remains connected to the origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This seminar will explore the relevant material remains from the Bronze Age through the end of the Ottoman period, and examine how these finds and their interpretations were shaped by religious and political motivations from the earliest endeavors to the present day.
    JUDS 1974 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Galor

HEBR

  • Elementary Hebrew

    An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. If registration is closed, please contact the professor and a wait list will be created. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special permission. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HEBR 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: HEBR 0200 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration, please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    HEBR 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Writing and Speaking Hebrew

    Enables students to improve their skills in speaking and writing Hebrew on a variety of topics. Features advanced work on language structure and active language practice in the classroom. Class discussions of Israeli current events draw on Israeli stories, poems, television programs, and films and on the Israeli press. Students also compose essays and stories in Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 0400 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HEBR 0500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda

BHBR

  • Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

    An intensive introduction to the fundamentals of biblical Hebrew grammar and vocabulary intended to prepare students to read biblical texts in the original language. For students with little or no prior knowledge of Hebrew.
    BHBR 0100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bisbee