Courses for Spring 2016

  • Israel's Wars

    Israel's history has unfolded under the shadow of its prolonged conflict with the Palestinians and its Arab neighbors. This first year seminar will survey the military aspect of this conflict. The major aim of the course is to present an historical survey of the Israeli-Arab wars and Jewish-Palestinian encounters in the 20th century. This will provide some of the necessary background for understanding the present phase of the Arab-Israeli conflict in the Middle East, and help in comprehending the roots and causes of contemporary controversies between Israel and the Palestinians and/or its Arab neighboring states. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS
    JUDS 0050H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • Readings in Biblical Hebrew

    An introduction to the reading of biblical texts in Hebrew. Reading of selected texts from narrative, law, and poetry in the Hebrew Bible, with a few texts in post-classical Hebrew (the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Mishnah) introduced late in the semester. Intended for students who have completed JUDS 0090A; others should consult the instructor.
    JUDS 0090B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
  • Elementary Hebrew

    This is the second half of a year-long course, an introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. Prerequisite: JUDS 0100. Students must have taken JUDS 0100 for credit to receive credit for this course. Exceptions must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. Enrollment limited to 20.
    JUDS 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: JUDS 0300 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    JUDS 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Issues in Contemporary Israeli Society, Politics, and Culture in Hebrew

    An exploration of current issues in contemporary Israeli society, politics, and culture: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, tensions between ultra-orthodox and secular Jews, religion and state, Israel as a Jewish and democratic state, the economic gap between rich and poor, the integration of citizens from a variety of backgrounds (Jews of Middle Eastern, North African, Russian, and Ethiopian origin; Arab citizens of Israel), gender relations. Sources include films, television programs, Internet news, works of literature. Conducted in Hebrew. Emphasizes strengthening Hebrew reading, writing, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: JUDS 0500. Students who have not taken JUDS 0500 should see instructor for permission to enroll.
    JUDS 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
  • How Bible Became Holy (RELS 0325)

    Interested students must register for RELS 0325 (CRN 24904).
  • History of the Holocaust

    Explores questions raised by the Holocaust regarding how such barbarism erupted in our so-called civilized and enlightened age. Attempts to analyze the meaning of the Holocaust from three vantage points: that of European, and more particularly, German history; that of Jewish history; and that of those states and religious institutions which shared responsibility. Enrollment limited to 40. If unable to enroll because of closed registration please contact the professor and a wait list will be created. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 0902 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Mishnah and Tosefta

    An examination and close reading of the Mishnah and Tosefta, two third-century CE documents foundational to rabbinic Judaism. The class will focus on both contemporary scholarly understandings of these texts and readings, in the original Hebrew, of the text itself. Knowledge of Hebrew (biblical, rabbinic, or two years of modern or its equivalent) required. DPLL LILE WRIT
    JUDS 1602 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
  • Jerusalem Since 1850: Religion, Politics, Cultural Heritage

    This seminar surveys the history of archaeological exploration, discovery, and interpretation in the contexts of social, political, and religious debates from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the post-1967 period. It examines the legal settings and ethical precepts of archaeological activity and the developing discourse of cultural heritage. It analyzes the ongoing struggle to discover and define the city's past, to expose its physical legacy, and to advance claims of scientific validity and objectivity against the challenges of religious zeal and political partisanship, the latter both intimately related though not necessarily limited to the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. WRIT
    JUDS 1620 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Galor
  • Ancient Synagogues, Churches, and Mosques in Palestine

    Reviews the discoveries and related scholarship of ancient synagogues, churches, and mosques in ancient Palestine. Focuses on their architectural and decorational as well as their spiritual and religious characteristics, and examines how those institutions influenced each other throughout their history of development. WRIT
    JUDS 1670 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Galor
  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture and Language

    Yiddish was the language spoken by most Jews in Eastern Europe and the countries to which they emigrated (including the U.S., England, South Africa, South American countries, and Israel) from the nineteenth century until after the Holocaust. It was the basis for a transnational Jewish culture and literature, and it played a central role in modern Jewish political life. We will explore the history of Yiddish culture and the development of the Yiddish press, literature, and cinema. The connection between Yiddish and modern Jewish politics will also be discussed. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to develop a basic knowledge of the Yiddish language. DPLL
    JUDS 1713 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
  • Jewish Humor and Commercial Entertainment in Early 20th-Century Europe and America

    The seminar explores the relationship between humor, popular culture and Jewish ethnic identity in early 20th-century Europe and America. It argues that self-deprecating humor and satiric performance of Jewish stereotypes were not expressions of self-hatred, but complex cultural gestures that led to in integration within mainstream society. Topics to be considered are: the joke as a social gesture; the Jewish music hall as an urban institution;the politics of blackface in American Vaudeville; the East-European Jews in Hollywood.
    JUDS 1726 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Early Modern Globalization

    What can the experience of a minority group like the Jews teach us about roots of globalization? What were the economic, political, and cultural conditions that allowed early modern Jewish merchants to create economic networks stretching from India to the New World? We will answer these questions by examining the connections and interactions between four major Jewish centers: Ottoman Jewry in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Port Jews of Amsterdam and London, Polish-Jewish estate managers in Ukraine, and the Court Jews of central Europe. We will see how European expansion exploited - and was exploited by - these Jewish entrepreneurs.
    JUDS 1727 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Kabbalah: An Introduction to Jewish Mysticism (HMAN 1971U)

    Interested students must register for HMAN 1971U (CRN 26271).
  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brink-Danan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Kraemer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research