Courses for Spring 2022

JUDS

  • Individual Study Projects

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see Banner for the correct course reference number (CRN) to use when registering for this course.
    JUDS 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Olyan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Satlow
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Vieira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    JUDS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Rojanski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Hope, Despair, and Longing in Jewish Thought

    What does messianism try to name in Jewish thought? From the divergence with Christianity, to the disappointed expectation of the 17th-century messiah Sabbatai Zvi and the rise of Hasidism and its reverence for the saintly (zaddik); from questions of justice, equality, and revolution to the interpretation of Jewish Statehood through the lens of supernal redemption, the messianic idea provides a window onto how Jews have made sense of exile and suffering, hope and longing. This class will introduce students to the history of Jewish thought through the lens of messianism, asking about the emotions and attachments that have become identified with the messianic idea and how this idea might help us understand political and ethical despair and longing in a world of human suffering.
    JUDS 0050K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nahme
  • Heidegger, the Jews, and the Crisis of Liberalism

    This class explores the enduring legacy of Heidegger’s critique of Western philosophy in political, theological, and social thought. Focusing primarily upon Heidegger’s reception in 20th-century Jewish philosophy, we will explore the allure of Heideggerian thought and its implication in both left and right political critiques of liberalism. Topics include onto-theology, phenomenology, and radical historicism; science, hermeneutics, and methodology in the humanities; liberalism and the secular; ethics, politics, action; de-structuration and deconstruction; time and the Other. Authors include Adorno, Arendt, Butler, Derrida, Levinas, Löwith, Marcuse, Rosenzweig, Schmitt, Strauss.
    JUDS 1614 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nahme
  • Digging for the Bible: Science, Religion, and Politics

    Archaeological exploration in the “Holy Land” began in the mid-19th century and was motivated by the quest to discover the biblical sites. This region features among the most important visual and material remains connected to the origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This seminar will explore the relevant material remains from the Bronze Age through the end of the Ottoman period, and examine how these finds and their interpretations were shaped by religious and political motivations from the earliest endeavors to the present day.
    JUDS 1974 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Galor
  • Race, Religion, and Ethnicity in the Study of Antiquity (RELS 1600A)

  • Educating Bodies in Ancient Christianity (RELS 1325A)

  • Jerusalem Divided: Politics and Cultural Heritage (URBN 1870K)

HEBR

  • Elementary Hebrew

    This is the second half of a year-long course, an introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew. Students also read Hebrew texts adapted for their level of Hebrew based on biblical, rabbinic, and modern Hebrew literature, which introduce them to the approaches of Hebrew writers in various periods and to a variety of cultural issues. Prerequisite: HEBR 0100. Students must have taken HEBR 0100 for credit to receive credit for this course. Exceptions must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HEBR 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Intermediate Hebrew

    Develops the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in contemporary Israeli Hebrew at the intermediate level and of reading Hebrew texts of the biblical, rabbinic, and modern periods (biblical stories, rabbinic legends, modern Hebrew poems, stories, essays, newspaper articles). Discussions and compositions focus on the psychological, cultural, political, and social issues reflected in the Hebrew sources that we study. Prerequisite: HEBR 0300 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. If unable to enroll because of closed registration please contact the professor and a wait list will be created.
    HEBR 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adler Ben Yehuda
  • Issues in Contemporary Israeli Society, Politics, and Culture in Hebrew

    An exploration of current issues in contemporary Israeli society, politics, and culture: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, tensions between ultra-orthodox and secular Jews, religion and state, Israel as a Jewish and democratic state, the economic gap between rich and poor, the integration of citizens from a variety of backgrounds (Jews of Middle Eastern, North African, Russian, and Ethiopian origin; Arab citizens of Israel), gender relations. Sources include films, television programs, Internet news, works of literature. Conducted in Hebrew. Emphasizes strengthening Hebrew reading, writing, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: HEBR 0500. Students who have not taken HEBR 0500 should see instructor for permission to enroll.
    HEBR 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobson

BHBR

No courses were found in this department.