The Rediscovery of America: American Indians and the Unmaking of U.S. History

October 13, 2014

With one of the strongest collections in the world for the study of the native past, the John Carter Brown Library is poised to open a series of conversations about how the Library can best acknowledge, encourage, and provide support for the important work already done in native studies on the Brown campus and beyond. As part of a new initiative called "The Earliest Americas," the Library presented “The Rediscovery of America: American Indians and the Unmaking of U.S. History,” a lecture by Yale Historian Ned Blackhawk (Western Shoshone) on Monday, October 13, 2014 at 5:30pm. A specialist in Native American history and a leading scholar in the field, Blackhawk is the author of Violence Over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West (Harvard, 2006), a study of the American Great Basin that garnered half a dozen professional prizes, including the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize from the Organization of American Historians. Introductory remarks were given by Dawn Dove, Narragansett Tribal Elder and Historian; Tyler Rogers, Ph.D. Student in the Department of American Studies at Yale University; Neil Safier, Director and Librarian of the John Carter Brown Library; and Elizabeth Hoover, Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University.